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How Not To Worry: The Remarkable Truth of How a Small Change Can Help You Stress Less and Enjoy Life More

ISBN: 978-0-85708-286-2
256 pages
May 2012, Capstone
How Not To Worry: The Remarkable Truth of How a Small Change Can Help You Stress Less and Enjoy Life More (0857082868) cover image

How to defeat stress, worry, and anxiety to achieve more in business and life. From the international bestselling author of Self-Confidence.

Are You A Worrier?

Do you seem to worry more than most? Do you find that insignificant things stress you out? Do you sweat the small stuff and the big stuff too? Well, now’s the time to stop worrying and start living.

Worry, stress, anxiety – whichever label you prefer to use – can have consequences that impact not only our lives, but the lives of others around us. When we worry it’s like the engine of our mind is constantly being revved up. It doesn’t allow us time to switch off and rest. It tires you out. And when you’re tired you’re less likely to think straight. And when you’re not thinking straight it’s easy to make stupid mistakes and confuse priorities...

 But relax. There is a way forward.

In How Not to Worry Paul McGee shows us that there is a way to tackle life’s challenges in a calmer and more considered way. It is possible to use a certain degree of worry and anxiety to spur us on towards positive, constructive action, and then leave the rest behind. With down to earth, real life advice, How Not to Worry helps us understand why worrying is such a big deal and the reasons for it, exposing the behavioural traps we fall into when faced with challenges. It then helps us to move on with tools and ideas to deal with our worries in a more constructive way.

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About Paul McGee xiii

Introduction 1

Section One: Stop, Understand 9

1 The Big Deal About Worry 11

2 Why Do We Worry? 29

3 Are We Wired to Worry? 65

4 Ever Got Lost in Loopy Logic? 87

Section Two: Move On 115

5 Let’s Get Rational 117

6 Manage Your Imagination 145

7 Show a Little Respect… to Yourself 167

8 How to Make Your Environment Friendly 199

And Finally… 221

Further Reading 229

Index 233

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September 14, 2012
New Book Which Can Help Worriers Deal With Small Stresses in Life

From Paul McGee, the bestselling author of ‘Self-Confidence: The Remarkable Truth About Why a Small Change Can Make a Big Difference’, now takes on the very current topic of Anxiety, with his trademark light approach and down-to-earth advice.

Worry, stress, anxiety – whichever label you prefer to use – can have consequences that impact not only our lives, but the lives of others around us. When we worry it’s like the engine of our mind is constantly being revved up. It doesn’t allow us time to switch off and rest. It tires you out. And when you’re tired you’re less likely to think straight. And when you’re not thinking straight it’s easy to make stupid mistakes and confuse priorities...

But relax. There is a way forward.

In his new book, ‘How Not to Worry: The Remarkable Truth of How a Small Change Can Help You Stress Less and Enjoy Life More’, Paul McGee, one of the UK’s leading speakers on the areas of change, confidence, workplace relationships, motivation and stress, shows readers that there is a way to tackle life’s challenges in a calmer and more considered way.

The not worrying strategies in the book will be: 

  • Have realistic expectations
  • Be a coach not a critic
  • Become a problem solver
  • Organize and prioritize
  • Action brings satisfaction
  • Chill out and sweat it out
  • Enjoy the journey

Weaving some examples of his own experiences in this accessible book, ‘How Not to Worry’ includes some illustrations to help break down different sections, for example, sections such as ‘Points to Ponder’ where the he pauses in the narrative to emphasis a point, ‘The Personal Stuff’ for real life case studies, and ‘Take Note’ where he gives the reader an exercise.

Anyone affected by this common feeling of apprehension, fear or worry will learn how to be more effective at work, deal more positively with change, and build better relationships.

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