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Intermarket Analysis: Profiting from Global Market Relationships

ISBN: 978-1-118-04555-8
288 pages
January 2011
Intermarket Analysis: Profiting from Global Market Relationships (1118045556) cover image
Praise for INTERMARKET ANALYSIS

"John Murphy has done it again. He dissects the global relationships between equities, bonds, currencies, and commodities like no one else can, and lays out an irrefutable case for intermarket analysis in plain English. This book is a must-read for all serious traders."
-Louis B. Mendelsohn, creator of VantagePoint Intermarket Analysis software

"John Murphy's Intermarket Analysis should be on the desk of every trader and investor if they want to be positioned in the right markets at the right time."
-Thom Hartle, President, Market Analytics, Inc. (www.thomhartle.com)

"This book is full of valuable information. As a daily practitioner of intermarket analysis, I thought I knew most aspects of this invaluable subject, but this book gave me several new ideas. I thoroughly recommend it for beginners and professionals."
-Martin Pring, President of Pring.com and editor of the Intermarket Review Newsletter

"Mr. Murphy's Intermarket Analysis is truly the most efficient and unambiguous way to define economic and fundamental relationships as they unfold in the market. It cuts through all of the conflicting economic news/views expressed each day to provide a clear picture of the 'here and now' in the global marketplace."
-Dennis Hynes, Managing Director, R. W. Pressprich

"Master Murphy is back with the quintessential look at intermarket analysis. The complex relationships among financial instruments have never been more important, and this book brings it all into focus. This is an essential read for all investors."
-Andrew Bekoff, Technical Strategist, VDM NYSE Specialists

"John Murphy is a legend in technical analysis, and a master at explaining precisely how the major markets impact each other. This updated version provides even more lessons from the past, plus fresh insights on current market trends."
-Price Headley, BigTrends.com, author of Big Trends in Trading
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Acknowledgments.

Introduction to Intermarket Analysis.

1. A Review of the 1980s.

2. 1990 and the First Persian Gulf War.

3. The Stealth Bear Market of 1994.

4. The 1997 Asian Currency Crisis and Deflation.

5. 1999 Intermarket Trends Leading to Market Top.

6. Review of Intermarket Principles.

7. The NASDAQ Bubble Bursts in 2000.

8. Intermarket Picture in Spring 2003.

9. Falling Dollar During 2002 Boosts Commodities.

10. Shifting from Paper to Hard Assets.

11. Futures Markets and Asset Allocation.

12. Intermarket Analysis and the Business Cycle.

13. The Impact of the Business Cycle on Market Sectors.

14. Diversifying with Real Estate.

15. Thinking Globally.

Appendix.

Index.

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JOHN J. MURPHY, former technical analyst for CNBC, is the Chief Technical Analyst for StockCharts.com and President of MurphyMorris ETF Fund. He has over thirty years of market experience and is author of several bestselling books, including Technical Analysis of the Financial Markets–which is widely regarded as the standard reference in the field. His book Intermarket Technical Analysis (Wiley) created a new branch of technical analysis emphasizing market linkages. Stocks & Commodities Magazine (October 2002) described his intermarket work as "unparalleled." His third book, The Visual Investor, also published by Wiley, applies charting principles to sector analysis. John has appeared on Bloomberg TV, CNN Moneyline, Nightly Business Report, and Wall $treet Week with Louis Rukeyser, and has been quoted in Barron’s and other prominent financial publications. He received a BA in economics and an MBA from Fordham University in New York. In 1992, John was given the first award for outstanding contributions to global technical analysis by the International Federation of Technical Analysts, and is the recipient of the 2002 Market Technicians Association Annual Award.
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“…valuable reading for the professional because it provides a detailed overview of a subject that still attracts relatively little attention...” (The Technical Analyst, April 2004)
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