Wiley
Wiley.com
Print this page Share

Connections for the Digital Age: Multimedia Communications for Mobile, Nomadic and Fixed Devices

ISBN: 978-1-118-05416-1
280 pages
September 2011
Connections for the Digital Age: Multimedia Communications for Mobile, Nomadic and Fixed Devices (1118054164) cover image
Explores and analyzes past and current technologies and trends in multimedia communication

Digital natives—those persons born in the digital age—have an ever-widening range of wireless-enabled devices at their disposal. They are the drivers of multimedia communications, continually seeking out the technologies and distribution channels that best match their needs. This book outlines the changes in telecommunications that are occurring to meet these needs. It addresses the continually increasing requirement to provide connections that make the electronic encounter as natural and convenient as possible, exploring the vast assortment of devices that exist as part of everyday living for digital natives.

Featuring precise diagrams and tables to illustrate the evolving environment, the book begins by describing the competitive interactions of telephone, cable TV, and cellular mobile companies in providing services and content. It outlines the creation of digital multimedia streams and how they are transported, explains what multimedia connections are available, and summarizes the activities of competitors while providing an overview of their markets and customer statistics.

This book uniquely covers wireline, optical fiber, cable, and wireless access methods, explaining the coding required to create digital streams. It combines ethernet with provider bridging and multi-protocol label switching and highlights the necessity to serve legacy streams. In addition, the book addresses controversial issue: will incumbent communications providers ever overtake Internet as the chief source of digital feeds and popular contents?

Featuring extensive references and a glossary of multimedia terms, Connections for the Digital Age is written for digital natives and other persons with an interest in multimedia communications; industrial, commercial, and financial managers; engineers; software professionals and Internet specialists; and students at technical schools and universities.

See More
Preface xiii

1 A Digital World 1

1.1 Digital Natives and Immigrants 3

1.2 Contemporary Communications 6

1.2.1 Public Switched Telephone Network 7

1.2.2 The Internet 11

1.2.3 Enterprise Networks 16

1.2.4 Off-Air and Cable Television 17

1.2.5 Radio Broadcasting 18

1.3 Triple-Play Services 20

1.4 Contemporary Facilities 20

1.5 Competition 21

1.5.1 Legacy Telcos 21

1.5.2 Legacy Cellcos 23

1.5.3 Legacy Cablecos 23

1.5.4 The Dominance of the Internet 23

1.6 The Business of Multimedia Services 24

1.6.1 Residential Market Development 24

1.6.2 Evolving Networks 25

1.6.3 New Business Models 26

1.7 Next Generation Networks 27

1.7.1 Current Activities 28

1.7.2 EUIST Wireless World Initiative 29

2 Signal Formats 31

2.1 Digital Voice 32

2.1.1 Waveform Sampling 32

2.1.2 Plesiochronous and Synchronous Hierarchies 34

2.1.3 Processing to Achieve Lower Bit Rate Coding 36

2.1.4 Aural Modeling 36

2.1.5 Vocal Tract Modeling 37

2.2 Digital Audio 38

2.3 Digital Pictures 39

2.3.1 Computer Graphics 39

2.3.2 Still Scenes 39

2.4 Digital Video 41

2.4.1 MPEG 2 41

2.4.2 MPEG 4 43

2.4.3 MPEG 7 43

2.4.4 Digital TV Systems 43

2.5 Text 46

2.6 A Common Signal Format 47

2.7 Modulated Signals 47

2.7.1 Single-Carrier Modulation 47

2.7.2 Spread Spectrum Techniques 50

2.7.3 Multicarrier Modulation 52

2.8 Optical Fiber Transmission 54

2.8.1 Single Mode Fiber 55

2.8.2 Step Index and Graded Index Fibers 55

2.8.3 Optical Amplifi ers 55

2.8.4 Optical Modulation 57

2.8.5 RF over Glass 58

2.9 Legacy Signal Formats 58

2.9.1 Packet Relay 58

2.9.2 Frame Relay 59

2.9.3 Cell Relay–Asynchronous Transfer Mode 60

3 Frames, TCP/IP, and VoIP 63

3.1 OSI Client-Server Model 64

3.2 Internet Model 66

3.2.1 Transport Layer 68

3.2.2 Internet Layer 70

3.2.3 Private Addresses 73

3.2.4 Link Layer 74

3.3 VoIP 75

3.3.1 Generating VoIP Packets 75

3.3.2 VoIP Performance 76

3.3.3 Real-Time Transport Protocol 78

3.3.4 H.323 Session Control Protocol 78

3.3.5 SIP Session Initiation Protocol 83

3.3.6 H.323 versus SIP 86

4 Carrier Ethernet 87

4.1 Ethernet Operation 89

4.1.1 Bridging Ethernets 90

4.1.2 Redundant Coding 90

4.1.3 Frame Extensions 91

4.2 Quality of Service 93

4.2.1 Integrated Services Framework 94

4.2.2 Differentiated Services Framework 95

4.2.3 Fairness 96

4.3 Carrier-Grade Ethernet 96

4.3.1 Bridges 98

4.4 Multiprotocol Label Switching 101

4.4.1 MPLS–Traffi c Engineering 102

4.4.2 Generalized MPLS 103

4.4.3 PBB-TE and MPLS-TE 103

4.4.4 Protection, Restoration, Resilience, and OA&M 103

4.5 Pseudowires 105

4.5.1 PWE3 Encapsulation 105

4.5.2 Provisioning Pseudowires 108

5 Wire, Fiber, Cable, and Wireless Access 111

5.1 Digital Subscriber Lines 112

5.1.1 Representative DSL Systems 114

5.1.2 Digital Subscriber Line Access Multiplexer 115

5.1.3 Ethernet in the Access Network 117

5.2 Optical Fiber 118

5.2.1 Optical Fiber Access Links 119

5.2.2 Passive Optical Fiber Access Network 119

5.2.3 EPON and GPON 121

5.3 Cable Access 121

5.3.1 Cable Industry Statistics 122

5.3.2 Cable Network Architecture 122

5.3.3 Cable Connections 124

5.3.4 Data Over Cable 125

5.3.5 Video Headend 126

5.3.6 PacketCable 127

5.4 Wireless Access 129

5.4.1 IEEE 802.11 Wireless LAN Medium Access Control and Physical Layer Specifi cations 130

5.4.2 Wireless LAN 135

5.4.3 WiFi 135

5.4.4 Bluetooth 137

5.4.5 IEEE 802.16 Air Interface for Fixed/Mobile Broadband Wireless Access Systems 137

5.4.6 WiMAX 139

6 Mobile Phones 143

6.1 First Generation Cellular Systems 144

6.2 The Air Interface 146

6.3 Roaming and Handover 147

6.4 Second Generation 148

6.4.1 Global System for Mobile Telecommunication 148

6.4.2 IS-136 149

6.4.3 IS-95 (cdmaOne) 150

6.5 Third Generation 150

6.5.1 Third Generation Partnership Project 151

6.5.2 Third Generation Partnership Project 2 162

6.6 Fourth Generation 168

6.6.1 Long-Term Evolution 168

6.6.2 IMT–Advanced 170

6.6.3 Seamless Mobility 171

6.6.4 Multiple Antennas 172

6.7 Backhaul 173

6.8 Satellite Mobile Phones 173

6.9 Skype 174

7 Future Networks and Services 175

7.1 IPTV 176

7.1.1 IPTV Network 177

7.1.2 IPTV Architectural Requirements 179

7.1.3 IPTV Middleware 181

7.2 Networked Home 184

7.2.1 G.hn 185

7.2.2 HomeGrid Forum 186

7.2.3 Multimedia Over Coax Alliance 186

7.2.4 Home Plug Powerline Alliance 186

7.2.5 Wi-Fi and Femtocells 187

7.3 Next Generation Networks 187

7.3.1 TISPAN NGN 188

7.3.2 Next Generation Cable Architecture 192

7.4 Omnibus Broadband Initiative 193

7.5 The Digital Future 194

7.5.1 The Activities of Digital Natives and Digital Immigrants 194

7.5.2 Advanced Terminals 198

7.5.3 Future Requirements 200

7.5.4 Provider Perspective 200

7.5.5 Implications for Digital Natives 202

Appendix A Security 203

A.1 Security Techniques 203

A.1.1 Authentication and Authorization 204

A.1.2 Privacy 204

A.1.3 Integrity 204

A.1.4 Nonrepudiation 204

A.2 Cryptography 205

A.2.1 Symmetrical Cryptosystem 205

A.2.2 Asymmetrical Cryptosystem 205

A.2.3 Digital Signatures 207

A.2.4 Certifi cation Authority 207

A.3 Specifi c Techniques 208

A.3.1 Wired Equivalent Privacy 208

A.3.2 Wi-Fi Protected Access v.2 209

A.3.3 Advanced Encryption Standard 209

A.3.4 Firewall 210

A.3.5 Viruses, Trojans, and Worms 210

Appendix B Protocols 213

Abbreviations 219

Glossary 229

Index 251

See More
E. Bryan Carne, PhD, has worked as a project engineer, manager, director, and general manager for contractors in military intelligence collection programs. Later, he directed telecommunications research programs and taught university-level courses in signal analysis. Dr. Carne is a Life Senior Member of IEEE, has authored more than thirty papers and articles, and has published five books on communication and artificial intelligence.
See More

Related Titles

Back to Top