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Writing Chemistry Patents and Intellectual Property: A Practical Guide

ISBN: 978-1-118-08443-4
320 pages
July 2011
Writing Chemistry Patents and Intellectual Property: A Practical Guide  (1118084438) cover image
Understanding intellectual property, safeguarding your ideas

Intellectual property is constantly at risk, and the protection of chemical science and technology through the patenting process allows individuals and companies to protect their hard work. But in order to truly be able to protect your ideas, you need to understand the basics of patenting for yourself.

A practical handbook designed to empower inventors like you to write your own patent application drafts in conjunction with an attorney, Writing Chemistry Patents and Intellectual Property: A Practical Guide presents a brand new methodology for success.

Based on a short course author Francis J. Waller gives for the American Chemical Society, the book teaches you how to structure a literature search, to educate the patent examiner on your work, to prepare an application that can be easily duplicated, and to understand what goes on behind the scenes during the patent examiner's rejection process.

Providing essential insights, invaluable strategies, and applicable, real-world examples designed to maximize the chances that a patent will be accepted by the United States Patent and Trademark Office, Writing Chemistry Patents and Intellectual Property is the book you need if you want to keep your work protected.

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PREFACE xiv

ACKNOWLEDGMENTS xvii

1. BACKGROUND AND HISTORICAL PERSPECTIVE ABOUT INTELLECTUAL PROPERTY 1

Chapter Objective / 1

Introduction / 1

Book Strategy for Patents / 6

A Brief History of Patenting / 7

Intellectual Property: Is It Important or Not? / 8

The U.S. Patent and Trademark Offi ce / 9

Why Intellectual Property Protection Is Currently Important / 13

Information Overload and Prior Art / 15

China as an Emerging Intellectual Powerhouse / 18

Patents as Sources of Technology / 19

Patents in Force Worldwide / 20

Chapter Summary / 20

Additional Reading / 20

Question / 21

2. BRIEF INTRODUCTION TO VOCABULARY AND DEFINITIONS 22

Chapter Objective / 22

Introduction / 22

Short Story from Panama / 23

Patent Terminology / 24

Trade Secret Definition / 30

Copyright / 31

Trademark Definition / 32

Chapter Summary / 33

Additional Reading / 33

Questions / 34

3. YOUR FIRST DECISION: TRADE SECRET OR PATENT? 35

Chapter Objective / 35

Introduction / 35

Trade Secret / 36

Patent / 39

Comparison between a Trade Secret and a Patent / 40

Chapter Summary / 41

Additional Reading / 41

Question / 42

4. WHAT COMES FIRST: A PROVISIONAL OR NONPROVISIONAL PATENT APPLICATION? 43

Chapter Objective / 43

Introduction / 43

Provisional Patent Application / 45

Nonprovisional Patent Application / 48

Patent Application Comparison / 49

Chapter Summary / 50

Additional Reading / 50

Question / 50

5. REASONS FOR PATENT OFFICE REJECTIONS 51

Chapter Objective / 51

Introduction / 51

Patentable Invention and Its Usefulness / 52

Novelty / 53

Nonobviousness / 54

Other Reasons for a Rejection / 56

Chapter Summary / 57

Additional Reading / 57

Question / 58

6. REASONS FOR INVALID PATENTS 59

Chapter Objective / 59

Introduction / 59

Experiments: Actual or by Insight / 60

Prior Art Disclosure / 60

Issued Patent Is Invalid / 61

Inequitable Conduct / 62

Other Considerations When Writing Your First Patent Application / 62

Another Point of View / 63

Chapter Summary / 63

Additional Reading / 64

Question / 64

7. EXAMPLES OF PATENT SPECIFICATIONS 65

Chapter Objective / 65

Introduction / 65

Key to Patenting Success / 66

Why Understanding Patents Is Important / 66

Typical Pathway for Patent Application within a Company / 67

Claim 1 and 2 of U.S. Patent 5,247,190 / 68

Examination of U.S. Patent 5,872,289 / 71

Format for Patent with Federal Support / 76

Examination of U.S. Patent 6,369,239 / 77

Examination of U.S. 2004/0010115A1 / 79

Examination of U.S. Patent 7,071,289 / 81

Examination of U.S. Patent 5,273,995 / 82

Examination of U.S. Patent 7,253,209 / 83

Comparing Claim Language with Written Description of Invention / 85

Chapter Summary / 87

Additional Reading / 88

Questions / 88

8. WRITING THE PATENT APPLICATION 89

Chapter Objective / 89

Introduction / 89

The Inventive Process / 90

Summary of Our Understanding for Patents and Trade Secrets / 92

Identifying a Problem to Be Solved / 93

Methodology to Solve a Complex Problem / 97

Possible Inventions from Our Everyday Reading / 101

Patentability Requirements / 102

Circumventing the Rules of Electrophilic Aromatic Substitution / 103

Water Splitting via Ruthenium Complex / 105

Detecting Mechanical Stress within a Polymer / 108

Places to Find Future Problems / 110

Controlling Molecular Size of Semiconductor Quantum Dots / 111

Chapter Summary / 113

Additional Reading / 113

Question / 114

9. AN EXAMINATION OF CLAIM FORMAT 115

Chapter Objective / 115

Introduction / 115

Interpretation of Claims / 116

General Background about Claim Language / 118

More Definition about Claims / 119

Specific Claim Language / 120

Chapter Summary / 123

10. WHY YOU NEED CONFIDENTIALITY AGREEMENTS 124

Chapter Objective / 124

Introduction / 124

Confidentiality Agreements in General / 125

Important Elements within a Confidentiality Agreement / 125

Chapter Summary / 127

Question / 127

11. PRACTICAL INFORMATION ABOUT COPYRIGHTS AND TRADEMARKS 128

Chapter Objective / 128

Introduction / 128

Copyright / 129

Copyright Interpretation / 131

Adjunct Professor Appointments and the Copyright / 133

Filing for a Copyright / 136

Trademarks / 137

Chapter Summary / 139

Question / 140

12. GLOBAL PATENT FILING AND PATENTING STRATEGY 141

Chapter Objective / 141

Introduction / 141

Developing a Patent Strategy / 142

International Patent Filing / 143

Filing Options / 145

Chapter Summary / 146

Questions / 147

13. WHAT ACADEMIC SCIENCE FACULTY SHOULD KNOW ABOUT PATENTS AND COPYRIGHTS 148

Chapter Objective / 148

Introduction / 148

Recent Background / 149

What Should You Do after Having a Novel Concept? / 150

Notebooks / 151

Invention Disclosure / 152

Confi dentiality Agreements / 153

Copyrights / 153

Chapter Summary / 154

Additional Reading / 154

Questions / 154

14. INTELLECTUAL PROPERTY RESOURCES 155

Chapter Objective / 155

Introduction / 155

Brief Summary of Selected Intellectual Property Books / 156

Intellectual Property Courses / 162

Worldwide Patent Offices / 163

Emerging Technology Fields / 163

Useful Organization / 164

Chapter Summary / 165

Additional Reading / 165

15. BOOK SUMMARY AND ON YOUR OWN 166

Chapter Objective / 166

Introduction / 166

Pending Intellectual Property Developments / 167

Summary of Previous Chapters / 167

Responsibilities of the Inventor / 168

Conclusions / 169

Chapter Summary / 170

Additional Reading / 170

16. RESPONSES TO QUESTIONS AT END OF CHAPTERS 171

Chapter Objective / 171

Chapter 1 / 171

Chapter 2 / 172

Chapter 3 / 173

Chapter 4 / 173

Chapter 5 / 174

Chapter 6 / 176

Chapter 7 / 177

Chapter 8 / 178

Chapter 10 / 178

Chapter 11 / 179

Chapter 12 / 179

Chapter 13 / 180

17. PATENT APPENDIX 181

Chapter Objective / 181

Useful Information Besides the Invention / 181

Chapter Summary / 184

U.S. Patent 5,872,289 / 185

U.S. Patent 6,369,239 / 194

U.S. Published Patent Application 2004/0010115A1 / 198

U.S. Patent 7,071,289 with Certificate of Correction / 207

U.S. Patent 5,273,995 / 219

U.S. Patent 7,253,209 / 229

INDEX 236

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FRANCIS J. WALLER, PhD, is a former senior research associate with Air Products and Chemicals, Inc. with more than thirty-five years of experience in industry and teaching. Dr. Waller is the author or coauthor of forty-six U.S. patents and received the Paul Rylander Award from the Organic Reactions Catalysis Society in 2001.
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"With this book, the author has made a good attempt to present this information in an unfussy way and with an obvious relevance to a working chemist." (Chemistry World, 2012)

 

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