Wiley
Wiley.com
Print this page Share
E-book

Atlas of Feline Ophthalmology, 2nd Edition

ISBN: 978-1-118-24216-2
192 pages
January 2012, Wiley-Blackwell
Atlas of Feline Ophthalmology, 2nd Edition (1118242165) cover image
Successful management of eye disease relies on the veterinarian’s ability to identify ocular features and distinguish pathologic changes. Atlas of Feline Ophthalmology, Second Edition is an invaluable diagnostic reference, providing high-quality color photographs for comparison with a presenting complaint. Presenting 394 photographs illustrating both normal and pathologic ocular conditions, this Second Edition offers a current, complete reference on ocular diseases, adding conditions recognized since publication of the first edition, a broader geographic scope, and many new images with improved quality.

Carefully designed for easy reference, the contents are divided into sections corresponding to specific anatomical structures of the eye. A useful appendix new to this edition groups figures by etiology, making it easy to find every image associated with a specific agent or disease. Atlas of Feline Ophthalmology, Second Edition is a useful tool aiding general practitioners in diagnosing eye disease in cats.

See More
The Table of Contents is presented in outline form to make it as useful and informative as possible. The figures have been grouped into 12 main sections, each corresponding to a condition or specific area of the eye. The initial subheads identify the disease, condition, or injury. Subsequent subheads are used to define specific aspects of each figure. Some figures are referenced more than once because they depict more than one clinical sign or condition; thus the numbers of the figures do not always appear in sequential order.

Listing of Breed Predispositions to Ocular Disease  page xvii

I. NORMAL EYE FIGURE

A. Diagrams

1. Cross-sectional  1

2. Fundus oculus 2

B. Normal adnexa/anterior segment

1. Frontal view  3, 4

2. Lateral view

a. Lens and cornea 5

b. Gross angle  6

3. Iridocorneal angle—Gonioscopic view  7

C. Normal fundus 8–17

II. GLOBE–ORBIT RELATIONSHIP

A. Convergent strabismus  18

B. Enophthalmos

1. Microphthalmia  19

2. Phthisis bulbi 20

3. Horner’s syndrome 21

4. Retrobulbar tumor  22

5. Pain 37, 40, 42, 76, 125, 143

C. Exophthalmos

1. Cellulitis/Retrobulbar abscess 23–25

2. Neoplasia

a. Retrobulbar lymphoma 26

b. Zygomatic osteoma  27

3. Orbital pseudotumor 28, 29

D. Proptosis  30

E. Orbitalmucocele 31, 32

III. ADNEXA

A. Eyelid agenesis  33–36

B. Entropion  37

C. Ectropion 38

D. Distichiasis  39

E. Blepharitis

1. Herpetic 40, 54

2. Allergic blepharitis  41, 42, 51

3. Bacterial blepharitis  43

4. Meibomianitis 44

5. Demodicosis  49

6. Mycobacterial dermatitis 50

7. Food allergy 52

8. Pemphigus erythematosus  53

9. Persian idiopathic facial dermatitis  55

F. Apocrine cystadenoma  45, 46

G. Chalazion 47

H. Lipogranulomatous conjunctivitis 48

I. Granuloma/Histoplasmosis  68

J. Neoplasia

1. Cutaneous histiocytosis  56

2. Squamous cell carcinoma 57–59

3. Adenocarcinoma  60, 61

4. Mast cell tumor  62–64

5. Melanoma  65

6. Periorbital lymphoma  66

7. Nerve sheath tumor 67

IV. CONJUNCTIVA

A. Dermoid 36, 69, 70

B. Symblepharon  72–75, 102

C. Conjunctivitis

1. Infectious

a. Herpesvirus  76, 77, 83

b. Chlamydophila  78–80, 84

c. Bartonella  81, 83, 84

d. Mycoplasma  82

e. Polymicrobial 83, 84

f. Ophthalmia neonatorum 71

g. Leishmania 88

h. Blastomycosis  89

i. Histoplasmosis  90

2. Allergic a. Insect sting 85

b. Drug reaction  42

3. Eosinophilic 86, 87, 104, 151

4. Traumatic  94

5. Conjunctival cysts  92, 93

6. Parasitic-Thelaziasis  95

D. Dacryocystitis  96

E. Neoplasia

1. Lymphoma  91

2. Melanoma  97, 98

V. NICTITATING MEMBRANE

A. Nictitans protrusion

1. Idiopathic prolapsed nictitating membrane  99

2. Glandular prolapse100

3. Everted cartilage 101

4. Symblepharon 102, 113

5. Horner’s syndrome 21

6. Abscess  103

7. Retrobulbar neoplasia 22

8. Phthisis bulbi 20

9. Pain 37, 40, 42, 76, 125, 143

B. Eosinophilic conjunctivitis 104

C. Neoplasia

1. Fibrosarcoma  105

2. Squamous cell carcinoma  106, 107

3. Lymphoma 108

4. Plasmacytoma  109

VI. CORNEA

A. Corneal opacities

1. Persistent pupillary membranes  110–112, 171, 172

2. Adherent leukoma 113, 158, 159

3. Corneal degeneration 114, 115

4. Florida spots 116, 117

5. Storage disease (MPS-VI)118

6. Relapsing polychondritis  119

B. Congenital Endothelial Dysfunction  123

C. Keratoconus  120, 121

D. Manx dystrophy  122

E. Infectious keratitis

1. Viral keratitis-Herpetic

a. Punctate 124

b. Dendritic  125, 126

c. Geographic 107, 127–131, 147, 153

2. Mycoplasma 132, 133

3. Bacterial

a. Staphylococcus  134

b. Pseudomonas135

4. Fungal

a. Candida  136

b. Aspergillus 137

5. Mycobacterial  138, 139

F. Ulcerative keratitis

1. Superficial ulceration

a. Keratoconjunctivitis sicca 25, 140, 153, 175, 176

b. Neurotrophic  140

2. Bullous keratitis 141

3. Bullous keratopathy142

4. Descemetocele 143, 144

5. Iris prolapse 35, 145

G. Corneal Laceration 146

H. Eosinophilic keratitis  107, 147–151

I. Corneal sequestration  37, 152–155

J. Foreign body 156

K. Staphyloma 157–159

L. Neoplasia

1. Limbal melanocytoma (Scleral shelf melanoma,

Epibulbar melanoma)  160–162

2. Neuroblastic  163

3. Squamous cell carcinoma 164

VII. ANTERIOR UVEA

A. Dyscorias

1. Iris coloboma  36, 165, 166

2. Corectopia 167

3. Idiopathic dyscoria 168

4. D-shaped pupil  169

5. Spastic pupil syndrome  170

B. Persistent pupillary membranes 110–112, 171, 172, 272

C. Chediak-Higashi syndrome  173

D. Iris atrophy  174

E. Dysautonomia  175, 176

F. Iris cysts/Iridocilary cysts 177–179, 267

G. Anterior uveitis

1. Iris abscess 184

2. Viral a. Feline leukemia complex/

Lymphoma  180–183, 185–190

b. FIV 190, 191

c. FIP 192–196

3. Toxoplasmosis 197–202

4. Fungal

a. Histoplasmosis 202–206

b. Cryptococcosi 207, 208

c. Blastomycosis  209, 210

d. Coccidioidomycosis 211

5. Bartonellosis  213–216, 244

6. Polymicrobial 190, 202, 212

7. Parasitic

a. Dirofilariasis  217

b. Myiasis  218

8. Metabolic/Hypertension

a. Hyperlipidemia  219

b. Systemic hypertension  220, 221

9. Trauma 222, 223

10. Lens Induced

a. Phacolytic  276

b. Septic lens implantation 224

11. Neoplasia

a. Feline diffuse iris melanoma

(FDIM)  225, 226, 229, 231, 269, 270

b. Iris melanoma  227, 228

c. Iris amelanotic melanoma 227, 230, 232

d. Iridociliary adenoma 233–236

e. Spindle cell tumor 237

f. Iridociliary leiomyoma 238

g. Iridociliary leiomyosarcoma 239, 240

h. Metastatic mammary adenocarcinoma 241

i. Squamous cell carcinoma242

j. Metastatic hemangiosarcoma  243

k. Primitive neural epithelial tumor244

l. Post-traumatic sarcoma  245, 246

12. Post-inflammatory sequelae

a. Lens capsule pigmentation 247, 250

b. Posterior synechia/Iris bomb´e  248, 249

c. Cataract 247, 248, 250

d. Anterior lens luxation 286

e. Iris cysts  179

f. Glaucoma  264–266, 268–270

VIII. GLAUCOMA

A. Congenital/Goniodysgenesis 251, 252, 261, 262, 288, 388

B. Inherited/Primary Open Angle Glaucoma (POAG)

1. Siamese  253

2. Domestic shorthair  254–257

C. Feline Aqueous Humor Misdirection Syndrome (FAHMS)
258–260

D. Secondary

1. Post-inflammatory/Infectious . . 209, 224, 263–265, 289

2. Systemic Hypertension 266

3. Iridocilary cysts  267

4. Neoplastic a. Spindle cell tumor  237

b. Lymphoma  190, 268

c. Feline diffuse iris melanoma

(FDIM) 232, 269, 270, 389

IX. LENS

A. Senile nuclear sclerosis  271

B. Cataract

1. Congenital/Persistent pupillary membranes  272, 274–277

2. Nutritional 273

3. Inherited 173, 275

4. Cataract resorption 277–279, 281

5. Trauma/Post-inflammatory  245–248, 280–282

6. Hypocalcemic 285

C. Cataract classification by involvement

1. Incipient  224, 247, 248, 258, 272, 273, 282, 285

2. Immature  173, 239, 247, 248, 274, 275, 280, 283

3. Mature 250, 260

4. Hypermature/Phacolytic uveitis  276, 284

5. Cataract resorption 19, 277–279, 281

D. Encephalitozoon cuniculi 283, 284

E. Lens luxation

1. Anterior  259, 260, 286, 288, 289

2. Posterior  254, 255, 257, 287

3. Subluxation 160, 256

X. VITREOUS

A. Persistent hyaloid 288

B. Vitreous hemorrhage  292

C. Hyalitis

1. FIV 289

2. Toxoplasmosis 290

3. Pyogranulomatous inflammation  291

4. Retinal detachment/Systemic hypertension  292

XI. RETINA AND CHOROID

A. Congenital

1. Cardiovascular Anomalies 293

2. Coloboma  294, 295

3. Retinal Folds 296, 297

B. Chorioretinitis-Infectious

1. Feline leukemia complex 298–301

2. Panleukopenia 302

3. Feline infectious peritonitis 303–308

4. Fungal conditions

a. Histoplasmosis  309–313, 386

b. Cryptococcosis  314–319

c. Blastomycosis  320–322

d. Coccidioidomycosis 323, 324

5. Toxoplasmosis 325–331

6. Feline hemotropic mycoplasmosis

(feline infectious anemia) 332

7. Bacterial 333

8. Ophthalmomyiasis  334, 335

C. Chorioretinitis-Traumatic  336, 349, 350

D. Hypertensive retinopathy 337–347

E. Retinal detachment

1. Renal failure/Systemic hypertension 338, 342–345

2. Trauma 348

3. Neoplasia  373, 374, 376

4. Infectious  308, 312, 313, 318, 321, 323, 331

F. Retinal folds

1. Dysplastic 296, 297

2. Inflammatory 305, 338

3. Traumatic  350

4. Neoplasia 371, 372

G. Retinopathy

1. Fluoroquinolone 354, 355

2. Feline central retinal degeneration (FCRD) 356–358

3. Feline generalized retinal atrophy (FGRA)  359–361

4. Post-trauma/Inflammation  351, 352, 387

5. Idiopathic  353

6. Progressive retinal atrophy (PRA)

a. Abyssinian  362, 363

b. Tonkinese  364

c. Burmese 365

d. Siamese  366

7. Chediak-Higashi syndrome 367

H. Vascular changes

1. Lipemia retinalis  368, 369

2. Cardiovascular anomalies293

3. Hyperviscosity  306

I. Neoplasia

1. Plasma cell tumor370

2. Retrobulbar 373, 374

3. Lymphoma 371, 372

4. Metastatic intestinal adenocarcinoma  375

5. Metastatic adenocarcinoma  376, 378

6. Metastatic hemangiosarcoma 377

XII. OPTIC NERVE

A. Coloboma 379, 380

B. Optic disc hypoplasia 381

C. Optic disc aplasia 382, 383

D. Optic neuritis

1. Cryptococcosis 319, 384

2. Toxoplasmosis 331

E. Optic nerve atrophy 385–389, 394

F. Glaucoma 388, 389

G. Neoplasia

1. Glioma  390

2. Lymphosarcoma 392

3. Meningioma  393, 394

Bibliography page 155

Systemic Disease Related Images  page 173

See More
Kerry Ketring, DVM, DACVO, a veterinary ophthalmologist, was in private practice in Ohio and Kentucky for 32 years; he retired to Michigan, where he continues to see clients. He also lectures nationally and internationally.

Mary Belle Glaze, DVM, MS, DACVO, is a veterinary ophthalmologist at the Gulf Coast Animal Eye Clinic, a private referral practice in Houston, Texas. Prior to that she was on staff at Louisiana State University’s Veterinary Teaching Hospital for 20 years and is a past president of the American College of Veterinary Ophthalmologists. She also lectures nationally and internationally.

See More

"This is a superb update of the previous edition. The beautiful photographs will give veterinary practitioners new tools for identifying and treating feline ophthalmic disease. This book will be very useful for both general practitioners and veterinary ophthalmologists.”  (Doody’s, 30 August 2012)

“In summary, the ‘Atlas of Feline Ophthalmology’ provides a comprehensive collection of pictures of feline ocular diseases and is a useful addition to the library of veterinary ophthalmologists and veterinarians with a deeper interest in ophthalmology.”  (Veterinary Record, 18 August 2012)

See More

Related Titles

Back to Top