Thank you for visiting us. We are currently updating our shopping cart and regret to advise that it will be unavailable until September 1, 2014. We apologise for any inconvenience and look forward to serving you again.

Wiley
Wiley.com
Print this page Share
E-book

How to Succeed at E-learning

ISBN: 978-1-118-30847-9
176 pages
May 2012, Wiley-Blackwell
How to Succeed at E-learning (1118308476) cover image

A basic guide to getting the best from e-learning for medical students, teachers and all healthcare professionals

How to Succeed at e-Learning answers the needs of all healthcare professionals either starting or continuing their studies but not knowing where to begin with e-learning. It is a valuable guide for learners in undergraduate and postgraduate medicine as well as related health professionals and essential for teachers of medicine who are beginning to transfer from print to electronic teaching and need to understand effective methods of presentation.

See More

Acknowledgements, ix

Chapter 1: Introduction, 1

1.1 Overview of the book, 1

1.2 Basic issues, 1

1.3 Challenges as drivers, 2

1.4 The start of technology in learning, 2

Reference, 4

Chapter 2: E-learning . . . what is it?, 5

2.1 Definitions, 5

2.2 Advantages of e-learning, 24

References, 26

Chapter 3: Evidence e-learning works, 29

3.1 Systematic reviews, 29

3.2 Examples of subject-specific studies (categorised by profession), 33

3.3 Summary of findings, 36

3.4 Conclusion, 37

References, 37

Chapter 4: Using e-learning to teach, 41

4.1 Requirement, 42

4.2 Exploration, 54

4.3 The course, 63

4.4 The assessment, 66

4.5 Choosing a platform, 67

4.6 Summary, 68

References, 68

Chapter 5: Access to e-learning, 71

5.1 The basics: files and folders, 71

5.2 Security, 72

5.3 The book and the browser, 73

5.4 Collaborative research, 76

References, 80

Chapter 6: Examples of technology in use, 83

6.1 A Taste of Medicine, 83

6.2 Examples of innovative e-learning from developing countries, 85

6.3 Examples from developed countries, 92

References, 93

Chapter 7: E-learning qualifications, 95

7.1 What to look for in an online course, 96

7.2 Clinical courses, 98

7.3 Leadership courses, 106

7.4 Management courses, 109

7.5 General information on internationally available online MBAs, 113

7.6 Mentoring courses, 114

7.7 Legal courses, 117

References, 120

Chapter 8: Research, 123

8.1 Just in time, just enough and on the move, 123

8.2 What is virtual reality (VR)?, 124

8.3 Virtual reality systems in medicine, 125

8.4 VR in obstetrics and gynaecology, 125

8.5 Life-size patient simulators, 127

8.6 Other simulation examples, 128

8.7 Whole-heart modelling, 129

8.8 Telling stories: understanding real-life genetics, 129

8.9 Second Life VR, 129

References, 133

Chapter 9: Looking towards the future, 135

9.1 The recent past, 135

9.2 Why is ‘computing power’ important and how is it defined?, 137

9.3 Past trends informing future trends, 137

9.4 Experiments involving neurosurgical implants, 139

9.5 Ongoing development in mobile technology, 140

9.6 Summary, 141

References, 141

Chapter 10: Conclusion, 143

Index, 147

See More

Peter Donnelly MB, BCh, BAO, FRCPysch, BA (Open), Deputy Dean, Wales Deanery, Cardiff University, Cardiff, UK

Paul Kirk BSc (Hons), MSc, PGCert Ed., E.Learning Unit Development Manager, Wales Deanery, Cardiff University, Cardiff, UK

Joel Benson BA (Hons), PGC (ODL), Electronic Resources Officer, Wales Deanery, Cardiff University, Cardiff, UK

See More

Related Titles

Back to Top