Wiley
Wiley.com
Print this page Share
E-book

Forensic Ecology Handbook: From Crime Scene to Court

ISBN: 978-1-118-37404-7
272 pages
October 2012, Wiley-Blackwell
Forensic Ecology Handbook: From Crime Scene to Court (1118374045) cover image

The analysis of plants, insects, soil and other particulates from scenes of crime can be vital in proving or excluding contact between a suspect and a scene, targeting search areas, and establishing a time and place of death. Forensic Ecology: A Practitioner’s Guide provides a complete handbook covering all aspects of forensic ecology. Bringing together the forensic applications of anthropology, archaeology, entomology, palynology and sedimentology in one volume, this book provides an essential resource for practitioners in the field of forensic science, whether crime scene investigators, forensic science students or academics involved in the recovery and analysis of evidence from crime scenes.

Forensic Ecology: A Practitioner’s Guide includes information not only on the search, location, recovery and analysis of evidence, but includes sampling strategies for diatom analysis, pollen and soils samples and entomology and provides guides for good practice. Each chapter provides background information on each discipline and is structured according to pre-scene attendance (what questions should the scientist ask when receiving a call? What sort of preparation is required?), scene attendance (including protocols at the scene, sampling strategies, recording), scientific examination of analysis of the evidence up to the stages and guidelines for witness statement and presenting evidence in court.

The book is written by specialists in all fields with a wealth of experience who are current forensic practitioners around the world. It provides an essential and accessible resource for students, academics, forensic practitioners and police officers everywhere.

See More
About the Editors ix

List of Contributors xi

Series Foreword xiii
Professor Niamh Nic Da´eid

Foreword xv
Jonathan Smith

Foreword xvii
Richard T. Shepherd

1 Introduction 1
Nicholas M´arquez-Grant and Julie Roberts

References 4

2 Aspects of crime scene management 7
Ruth Buckley and Andy Langley

2.1 Introduction 7

2.2 Professionals within the investigation 7

2.3 Crime scene principles 12

2.4 Records and documentation 14

2.5 Crime scene attendance 16

2.6 Expectations 19

2.7 Conclusion 19

Acknowledgements 20

References 20

3 Forensic archaeology 23
Stephen Litherland, Nicholas M´arquez-Grant and Julie Roberts

3.1 Introduction 23

3.2 Forensic archaeology at a crime scene 25

3.3 Pre-scene attendance 28

3.4 Scene attendance 29

3.5 Case studies 40

3.6 Reporting and court testimony 42

3.7 Conclusion 44

References 45

4 Forensic anthropology 49
Julie Roberts and Nicholas M´arquez-Grant

4.1 Introduction 49

4.2 The role of the Forensic Anthropologist in criminal investigation 49

4.3 Pre-scene attendance 52

4.4 Scene attendance 53

4.5 In the mortuary 56

4.6 Positive identification 60

4.7 Production of an Expert Witness Statement and court attendance 61

4.8 Conclusion 64

References 65

5 Forensic radiography 69
Mark Viner

5.1 Introduction and current state of the discipline 69

5.2 Application of radiology to the analysis and identification of human remains 70

5.3 Conclusion 79

References 80

6 DNA analysis for victim identification 85
Michael Walbank and Andrew McDonald

6.1 Introduction 85

6.2 Taking DNA samples from the deceased 85

6.3 Collection of reference samples for victim identification 90

6.4 DNA laboratory analysis 91

6.5 Common DNA profiling tests 94

6.6 Conclusion 98

References 98

7 Other scientific methods related to victim identification 99

7.1 Introduction 99
Nicholas M´arquez-Grant and Julie Roberts

7.2 Dating of human remains 100
Gordon Cook

References 105

7.3 Other analytical techniques 107
Sophie Beckett

References 109

8 Forensic entomology 111
Martin Hall, Amoret Whitaker and Cameron Richards

8.1 Introduction and current state of the discipline 111

8.2 Applications 114

8.3 Pre-scene attendance 115

8.4 Scene attendance 117

8.5 Mortuary attendance 125

8.6 Laboratory analysis 125

8.7 Reporting and court appearance 130

8.8 Conclusion 131

References 131

9 Diatoms and forensic science 141
Eileen J. Cox

9.1 Introduction 141

9.2 Applications 144

9.3 Pre-scene attendance 145

9.4 Scene attendance and sampling 145

9.5 Preparation and treatment of samples in the laboratory 146

9.6 Analysis of samples 147

9.7 Reporting and court appearance 148

References 149

10 Forensic palynology 153
Beverley Adams-Groom

10.1 Introduction and current state of the discipline 153

10.2 Pollen 154

10.3 Applications 158

10.4 Pre-scene attendance 160

10.5 Scene attendance 161

10.6 Mortuary attendance 165

10.7 Laboratory analysis 165

10.8 Reporting and court appearance 166

References 167

11 Forensic botany 169
Heather Miller Coyle, Peter Massey and Peter Valentin

11.1 Introduction 169

11.2 Applications 169

11.3 Pre-scene attendance 170

11.4 Scene attendance 171

11.5 Mortuary attendance 174

11.6 Laboratory analysis 175

11.7 Reporting and court appearance 177

11.8 Conclusion 179

References 179

12 Forensic geology and soils 183
Duncan Pirrie and Alastair Ruffell

12.1 Introduction and current state of the discipline 183

12.2 Applications for forensic geology 186

12.3 Pre-scene attendance 189

12.4 Scene attendance and sampling 190

12.5 Sampling and preparation in the laboratory 195

12.6 Laboratory analysis 197

12.7 Reporting and court appearance 199

Acknowledgements 200

References 200

13 Exhibits 203
Chris Webster

13.1 Introduction 203

13.2 Exhibit principles 204

13.3 Recovery procedures 205

13.4 Labelling exhibits 206

13.5 Key exhibit principles 209

13.6 Practical guidelines for exhibit handling 213

13.7 Splitting exhibits 216

13.8 Long-term sporadic seizures of exhibits 217

13.9 Unsealing and resealing exhibits for examination 218

13.10 Conclusion 219

References 220

14 Forensic photography 221
John Yoward

14.1 Introduction 221

14.2 Basic elements of photography 222

14.3 Security of images 228

14.4 The forensic photographer and the crime scene 229

14.5 The forensic photographer at the mortuary 230

14.6 Conclusion 231

References 231

Index 233

See More
Back to Top