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Bioactive Compounds from Marine Foods: Plant and Animal Sources

ISBN: 978-1-118-41287-9
464 pages
September 2013, Wiley-Blackwell
Bioactive Compounds from Marine Foods: Plant and Animal Sources (1118412877) cover image

Description

Part of the IFT Press series, this book reviews the myriad published information on bioactive components derived from marine foods, enabling researchers and product developers to select appropriate functional ingredients for new products. 

Chapters cover foods and food ingredients from both animal and plant marine sources, focusing on those which demonstrate biological properties and whose constituent compounds have been isolated and identified as potentially active. This book further addresses the biological activities of PUFAs (Polyunsaturated fatty acids), oils, phospholipids, proteins and peptides, fibres, carbohydrates, chitosans, vitamins and minerals, fucoxantin, polyphenols, phytosterols, taurine, amongst others. These components, found in a variety of marine-derived foods, have been demonstrated to have preventative properties with regard to hypertension, oxidative stress, inflammation, cardiovascular diseases, cancer and other human diseases.

Extraction methods and analysis techniques are also addressed. Intended for food scientists, food technologists and food engineers in academia, industry and government, this book reviews the substantial quantity of current research in this fast-moving and commercially valuable sector of food and nutrition science.
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Table of Contents

List of Contributors xvii

1 An Update on the Biomedical Prospects of Marine-derived Small Molecules with Fascinating Atom and Stereochemical Diversity 1
Yvette Mimieux Vaske and Phillip Crews

1.1 Introduction 1

1.2 A view based on atom diversity 11

1.3 A view based on stereochemical diversity 15

1.4 Case studies of chemical probes and chemical probes in the therapeutic discovery pipeline 20

1.5 Conclusion 21

Acknowledgments 21

References 21

2 Antihypertensive Peptides from Marine Sources 27
Roseanne Norris, P´adraig´ýn A. Harnedy, and Richard J. FitzGerald

2.1 Introduction 27

2.2 Marine antihypertensive peptides and blood pressure control 28

2.3 Generation of marine antihypertensive peptides 32

2.4 Structure–activity relationships 32

2.5 Bioavailability 33

2.6 In vivo animal studies 35

2.7 In vivo human studies 41

2.8 Marine peptides as antihypertensive ingredients 45

2.9 Conclusion 48

Acknowledgments 48

References 48

3 Bioactive Peptides from Marine Processing Byproducts 57
Maria Hayes and David Flower

3.1 Introduction 57

3.2 Fish muscle proteins: precursors of fish bioactive peptides 58

3.3 Fish meal production 59

3.4 Fish silage production 59

3.5 Traditional fermented fish protein products 60

3.6 Strategies for the generation of bioactive peptides from marine byproducts 60

3.7 Conclusion 66

Acknowledgments 67

References 67

4 Development of Marine Peptides as Anticancer Agents 73
Xiukun Lin and Lanhong Zheng

4.1 Introduction 73

4.2 Peptides that induce apoptosis 73

4.3 Peptides that affect the tubulin–microtubule equilibrium 81

4.4 Peptides that inhibit angiogenesis 83

4.5 Peptides without a known mechanism for their antitumor activity 84

4.6 Conclusion 85

Acknowledgments 86

References 86

5 Using Marine Cryptides against Metabolic Syndrome 95
Yesmine Ben Henda and St´ephanie Bordenave-Juchereau

5.1 Marine cryptides 95

5.2 Definition of MetS 96

5.3 Potential targets for marine cryptides 97

5.4 Conclusion 108

References 108

6 Bioactive Phenolic Compounds from Algae 113
Yolanda Freile-Pelegr´ýn and Daniel Robledo

6.1 Introduction 113

6.2 Phenolic compounds from algae 116

6.3 Algal phenolics as bioactive compounds 120

6.4 Conclusion 122

Acknowledgments 124

References 124

7 Bioactive Carotenoids from Microalgae 131
A. Catarina Guedes, Helena M. Amaro, Isabel Sousa-Pinto, and F. Xavier Malcata

7.1 Introduction 131

7.2 Potential health benefits 131

7.3 Conclusion 144

Acknowledgments 144

References 145

8 Omega-3 Fatty Acid-enriched Foods: Health Benefits and Challenges 153
Charlotte Jacobsen

8.1 Introduction 153

8.2 Overview of the health benefits of marine omega-3 fatty acids 153

8.3 Lipid oxidation: a major challenge 155

8.4 Conclusion 168

References 168

9 Sterols in Algae and Health 173
Graciliana Lopes, Carla Sousa, Patr´ýcia Valent˜ao, and Paula B. Andrade

9.1 Introduction 173

9.2 Biosynthesis of phytosterols 176

9.3 Analysis of phytosterols 179

9.4 Phytosterol composition of algae 181

9.5 Phytosterols and health 181

9.6 Conclusion 187

Acknowledgments 187

References 187

10 Biological Effects and Extraction Processes Used to Obtain Marine Chitosan 193
A. Montilla, A. I. Ruiz-Matute, and N. Corzo

10.1 Introduction 193

10.2 Chitin extraction processes 193

10.3 Obtention of chitosan 195

10.4 Attainment of chitooligosaccharides 200

10.5 Biological activities of chitosan and COS 201

10.6 Food applications 208

10.7 Regulatory aspects 210

10.8 Conclusion 210

Acknowledgments 210

References 210

11 Biological Activity of Algal Sulfated and Nonsulfated Polysaccharides 219
Pilar Rup´erez, Eva G´omez-Ord´o˜nez, and Antonio Jim´enez-Escrig

11.1 Introduction 219

11.2 Current interest in seaweeds 220

11.3 Polysaccharides: occurrence, structure, and bioactivity 224

11.4 Conclusion 238

Acknowledgments 238

References 239

12 Taurine Content in Marine Foods: Beneficial Health Effects 249
Rune Larsen, Karl-Erik Eilertsen, Hanne Mæhre, Ida-Johanne Jensen, and Edel O. Elvevoll

12.1 Introduction 249

12.2 Taurine physiology 250

12.3 Dietary sources 252

12.4 Health benefits of dietary intake of taurine 260

12.5 Conclusion 262

References 262

13 Seaweed Antimicrobials: Isolation, Characterization, and Potential Use in Functional Foods 269
Shiau Pin Tan, Laurie O’Sullivan, Maria Luz Prieto, Peter McLoughlin, Peadar G. Lawlor, Helen Hughes, and Gillian E. Gardiner

13.1 Introduction 269

13.2 Seaweeds 270

13.3 Extraction of antimicrobial compounds from seaweeds 273

13.4 Separation and purification of antimicrobial compounds from seaweeds 279

13.5 Structural elucidation of antimicrobial compounds from seaweeds 288

13.6 In vitro assessment of the antimicrobial activity of seaweeds and
seaweed-derived compounds 293

13.7 Potential applications of seaweed antimicrobials in functional foods 299

13.8 Conclusion 302

Acknowledgments 302

References 303

14 Seaweed-based Functional Foods 313
Nissreen Abu-Ghannam and Sabrina Cox

14.1 Introduction 313

14.2 Overview of seaweed bioactive components for the development of functional foods 314

14.3 Seaweed pretreatment prior to incorporation in functional foods 316

14.4 Incorporation of seaweeds in the development of functional foods 320

14.5 Conclusion 323

Acknowledgments 324

References 324

15 Sea Cucumber as a Source of Bioactive Compounds: Current Research on Isostichopus badionotus and Isostichopus fuscus from Mexico 329
Leticia Olivera-Castillo, Raquel Garc´ýa Barrientos, Isabel Guerrero Legarreta, Arisa´ý Hern´andez S´amano, and Yasser Chim Chi

15.1 Introduction 329

15.2 Taxonomy and classification 330

15.3 Habitat and distribution 330

15.4 Worldwide markets 330

15.5 Sea cucumber species of commercial interest in Mexico 331

15.6 Biologically active compounds: enzymes and peptides 332

15.7 Conclusion 338

Acknowledgments 338

References 338

16 Advanced Extraction Processes to Obtain Bioactives from Marine Foods 343
Merichel Plaza and Irene Rodr´ýguez-Meizoso

16.1 Introduction 343

16.2 Fundamentals of extraction from solid samples 344

16.3 Sample pretreatment before extraction 351

16.4 Supercritical fluid extraction 353

16.5 Pressurized fluid extraction 359

16.6 Ultrasound-assisted extraction 362

16.7 Microwave-assisted extraction 363

16.8 Latest trends in advanced extraction 365

16.9 Conclusion 367

Acknowledgments 367

References 368

17 Extraction of High-added-value Compounds from Codfish (Gadus morhua) Salting Wastewater 373
Vincenza Ferraro, Isabel B. Cruz, Ruben Ferreira Jorge, Manuela E. Pintado, and Paula M. L. Castro

17.1 Introduction 373

17.2 Byproducts and waste from the codfish salting process 374

17.3 Conclusion 388

References 388

18 Toxicity Risks Associated with the Recovery of Bioactive Compounds from Marine Sources 395
Ljerka Prester

18.1 Introduction 395

18.2 Seafood-associated infections 396

18.3 Toxin-related seafood illnesses 399

18.4 Seafood allergy 407

18.5 Contaminants in fish and shellfish 409

18.6 The risks and benefits of fish consumption 415

18.7 Conclusion 415

Acknowledgments 416

References 416

Index 431

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Author Information

About the editors

Dr Blanca Hernández-Ledesma
Institute of Food Science Research (CIAL, CSIC-UAM), Madrid, Spain

Dr Miguel Herrero Institute of Food Science Research (CIAL, CSIC-UAM), Madrid, Spain

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Reviews

“The book, an easy and efficient read, provides an up-to-date summary of current research into marine–derived bioactive compounds suitable for innovative functional food products capable of supporting world demand. The work deserves a valuable spot in the library of students or professionals working in the field.”  (Journal of Aquatic Food Product Technology, 25 May 2014)

 

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