Thank you for visiting us. We are currently updating our shopping cart and regret to advise that it will be unavailable until September 1, 2014. We apologise for any inconvenience and look forward to serving you again.

Wiley
Wiley.com
Print this page Share

Crowdstorm: The Future of Innovation, Ideas, and Problem Solving

ISBN: 978-1-118-43320-1
230 pages
February 2013
Crowdstorm: The Future of Innovation, Ideas, and Problem Solving (1118433203) cover image

A practical guide to tapping into the abundant ideas and talent outside your organization  

Successful organizations are constantly searching for new ideas.  Historically, organizations have looked to their employees and select partners. They have used techniques like brainstorming to gather and evaluate ideas.  However, in today’s market, talent and new ideas can be found everywhere.  

The Internet has enabled organizations to greatly expand their searches far beyond their four walls.  Instead of ten or one hundred people, organizations from startups to Fortunate 500 firms can work with thousands or tens of thousands to discover and assess many, many more ideas (as well as prototypes, partners and people).   We call this Crowdstorming.  

But how do you organize so many people and ideas to get the best results? 

Our goal is to help our readers make Crowdstorming work; to help more organizations engage with people far beyond their organizational borders, to find better ideas, solutions, talent and partners so we can address some of our most challenging problems -- not just for the sake of business, but for our society, too. 

  • Shaun Abrahamson has spent more than a decade as an early stage investor and advisor partnering with leading startups and global organizations to identify, create and launch new businesses enabled by newly possible relationships with customers and experts.
  • Peter Ryder is the former President of jovoto and has broad experience as a consultant helping organizations improve their business through the use of new technologies.
  • Bastian Unterberg is the founder and CEO of jovoto, a Berlin and NYC based firms that organizes a 40,000 person strong creative community to work with global brands on problems ranging from new product design to sustainable architecture.
See More

Introduction v

Chapter 1 First, Some Context 1

Chapter 2 Intellectual Property, Confidentiality, and Brands 21

Chapter 3 Ask the Right Question 41

Chapter 4 Fair Incentives to Motivate 59

Chapter 5 Build the Coalition 81

Chapter 6 Recruit the Best Participants 103

Chapter 7 Manage Communities to Facilitate Great Outcomes 121

Chapter 8 Understand Participant Contributions 145

Chapter 9 Reign in the Tyranny of Ideas 161

Chapter 10 Choose the Right Online Space 181

Chapter 11 Meta 199

Acknowledgments 209

Notes 211

Index 221

See More

Shaun Abrahamson is an early stage investor and advisor. For the last decade, he has worked with some of today's leading startups. At Mutopo, he advises global firms on how to benefit from online connections with customers and experts. He built computer-aided design tools at MIT, studied at the Berlin School of Creative Leadership, lectured at the Wharton School and New York University, and contributed to the Economist Intelligence Unit.

Peter Ryder is the former president of jovoto, Inc., a startup whose platform and community help companies innovate and solve challenges facing their business. After a successful career in consulting at Deloitte, CSC, and Accenture helping organizations use technology to transform their operations, he now invests in new ventures and advises organizations on how to take advantage of new technologies in today's digital economy.

Bastian Unterberg is the founder and CEO of jovoto, a Berlin- and NYC-based firm that organizes a 40,000-person strong creative community to work with global brands on problems ranging from new product design to sustainable architecture. His work has been featured in various media such as Page, New York Times, Focus, and Fast Company. An active speaker, Bastian presents at various national and international conferences.

See More
February 06, 2013
Find Better Ideas, Solutions, Talent and Partners by Crowstorming

Traditional ways of developing ideas for the market are becoming less relevant. Today, the time-to-innovate ratio is compressed to respond quickly to a changing, fluid business environment. Increasingly, organizations recognize that a new foundation for problem-solving and innovation is required to respond rapidly to changes in their business. The solution: accessing a broad array of talent wherever it exists in order in order to outperform the competition.

Historically, organizations have looked to their employees and select partners for new ideas. They have used techniques like brainstorming to gather and evaluate ideas.  However, in today’s market, talent and new ideas can be found everywhere.  In their new book, Crowdstorm: The Future of Innovation, Ideas, and Problem Solving (Wiley, February 2013), authors Shaun Abrahamson, Peter Ryder and Bastian Unterberg show readers how leading organizations are tapping into outside talent for everything from strategy and business development to design and marketing.

“The Internet has enabled organizations to greatly expand their searches far beyond their four walls,” says Unterberg. “Instead of ten or one hundred people, organizations from startups to Fortune 500 firms can work with thousands or tens of thousands to discover and assess many more ideas (as well as prototypes, partners, and people). We call this crowdstorming.”

Crowdstorm shows readers how to effectively work with external networks to solicit, refine, and select ideas. By learning the patterns and gathering the right tools, organizations will discover the best approaches to planning, organizing, and executing crowdstorming projects.  This practical guide shows readers:

  • How to address internal concerns about working with external talent
  • How to organize so many people and ideas to get the best results
  • How to pose the right questions to large groups of participants
  • How to build fair incentives that compel that community to participate
  • How to effectively manage online crowdstorming processes
  • The technology alternatives to enable crowdstorming
  • How to evaluate results and select the best ideas
  • How the authors used crowdstorming to create the book

“Our goal is to help our readers make crowdstorming work,” says Abrahamson. “To help more organizations engage with people far beyond their organizational borders, to find better ideas, solutions, talent and partners so we can address some of our most challenging problems -- not just for the sake of business, but for our society, too.”

By learning the processes and gathering the right tools, organizations will be able to attract and motivate talent to improve their approach to complex problem solving, idea creation, and innovation.

See More
Back to Top