Wiley.com
Print this page Share
E-book

Handbook of Health Survey Methods

ISBN: 978-1-118-59474-2
840 pages
October 2014
Handbook of Health Survey Methods (1118594746) cover image

Description

A comprehensive guidebook to the current methodologies and practices used in health surveys

A unique and self-contained resource, Handbook of Health Survey Methods presents techniques necessary for confronting challenges that are specific to health survey research. The handbook guides readers through the development of sample designs, data collection procedures, and analytic methods for studies aimed at gathering health information on general and targeted populations.

The book is organized into five well-defined sections: Design and Sampling Issues, Measurement Issues, Field Issues, Health Surveys of Special Populations, and Data Management and Analysis. Maintaining an easy-to-follow format, each chapter begins with an introduction, followed by an overview of the main concepts, theories, and applications associated with each topic. Finally, each chapter provides connections to relevant online resources for additional study and reference. The Handbook of Health Survey Methods features:

  • 29 methodological chapters written by highly qualified experts in academia, research, and industry
  • A treatment of the best statistical practices and specific methodologies for collecting data from special populations such as sexual minorities, persons with disabilities, patients, and practitioners
  • Discussions on issues specific to health research including developing physical health and mental health measures, collecting information on sensitive topics, sampling for clinical trials, collecting biospecimens, working with proxy respondents, and linking health data to administrative and other external data sources
  • Numerous real-world examples from the latest research in the fields of public health, biomedicine, and health psychology

Handbook of Health Survey Methods
is an ideal reference for academics, researchers, and practitioners who apply survey methods and analyze data in the fields of biomedicine, public health, epidemiology, and biostatistics. The handbook is also a useful supplement for upper-undergraduate and graduate-level courses on survey methodology.
See More

Table of Contents

List of Contributors xvii

Preface xxi

Acknowledgments xxiii

1 Origins and Development of Health Survey Methods 1
Timothy P. Johnson

1.1 Introduction 1

1.2 Precursors of Modern Health Surveys 1

1.3 The First Modern Health Surveys 4

1.4 The Emergence of National Health Surveys 5

1.5 Post-WWII Advances 6

1.6 Current Developments 7

References 9

Online Resources 17

2 Sampling For Community Health Surveys 21
Michael P. Battaglia

2.1 Introduction 21

2.2 Background 22

2.3 Theory and Applications 24

2.4 Subpopulation Surveys 30

2.5 Sample Size Considerations 32

2.6 Summary 32

References 33

Online Resources 34

3 Developing a Survey Sample Design for Population-Based Case–Control Studies 37
Ralph DiGaetano

3.1 Introduction 37

3.2 A “Classic” Sample Design for a Population-Based Case–Control Study 39

3.3 Sample Design Concepts and Issues Related to Case–Control Studies 40

3.4 Basic Sample Design Considerations 49

3.5 Sample Selection of Cases 56

3.6 Sample Selection of Controls 57

3.7 Sample Weighting for Population-Based Case–Control Studies 62

3.8 The Need to Account for Analytic Plans When Developing a Sample Design: An Example 65

3.9 Sample Designs for Population-Based Case–Control Studies: When Unweighted Analyses Are Planned 66

3.10 Mimicking the Classic Design Using RDD-Based Sampling of Population-Based Controls 66

3.11 Examples of the Development of Complex Sample Designs for Population-Based Case–Control Studies Using Weighted Analyses Where Cases Serve as the Reference Population and Variance Estimates Reflect the Sample Design 69

3.12 Summary 71

References 71

Online Resources 75

4 Sampling Rare Populations 77
James Wagner and Sunghee Lee

4.1 Introduction 77

4.2 Traditional Probability Sampling Approaches 80

4.3 Nontraditional and Nonprobability Sampling Approaches 84

4.4 Conclusion 95

References 97

Online Resources 103

5 Assessing Physical Health 107
Todd Rockwood

5.1 Introduction 107

5.2 Assessing Health: Response Formation and Accuracy 110

5.3 Conceptual Framework for Developing and Assessing Health 118

5.4 Measurement Theory 124

5.5 Error and Methodology 129

5.6 Conclusion 132

References 134

Online Resources 141

6 Developing and Selecting Mental Health Measures 143
Ronald C. Kessler and Beth-Ellen Pennell

6.1 Introduction 143

6.2 Historical Background 144

6.3 Fully Structured Diagnostic Interviews 147

6.4 Dimensional Measures of Symptom Severity 148

6.5 Emerging Issues in Survey Assessments of Mental Disorders 156

6.6 Conclusion 159

References 159

Online Resources 169

7 Developing Measures of Health Behavior and Health Service Utilization 171
Paul Beatty

7.1 Introduction 171

7.2 The Conceptual Phase of Questionnaire Development 172

7.3 Development of Particular Questions 173

7.4 Overall Questionnaire Construction 184

7.5 Questionnaire Testing and Evaluation 186

7.6 Using Questions from Previously Administered Questionnaires 187

7.7 Conclusion 187

References 188

Online Resources 190

8 Self-Rated Health in Health Surveys 193
Sunghee Lee

8.1 Introduction 193

8.2 Utility of Self-Rated Health 195

8.3 Theoretical Evidence: Cognitive Processes Pertinent to Responding to SRH in Surveys 198

8.4 Measurement Issues for Self-Rated Health 201

8.5 Conclusion 206

References 207

Online Resources 216

9 Pretesting of Health Survey Questionnaires: Cognitive Interviewing Usability Testing and Behavior Coding 217
Gordon Willis

9.1 Introduction 217

9.2 Historical Background and Theory of Pretesting 218

9.3 Cognitive Interviewing 220

9.4 Usability Testing 229

9.5 Behavior Coding 232

9.6 Summary 236

References 238

Online Resources 241

10 Cross-Cultural Considerations in Health Surveys 243
Brad Edwards

10.1 Introduction 243

10.2 Theory and Practice 255

10.3 Conclusion 266

References 266

Online Resources 274

11 Survey Methods for Social Network Research 275
Benjamin Cornwell and Emily Hoagland

11.1 Introduction 275

11.2 Respondents as Social Network Informants 277

11.3 Whole Egocentric and Mixed Designs 277

11.4 Name Generators 282

11.5 Free Versus Fixed Choice 286

11.6 Name Interpreters 287

11.7 Social Network Measures 288

11.8 Other Approaches to Collecting Network-Like Data 292

11.9 Modes of Data Collection and Survey Logistics 295

11.10 Avoiding Endogeneity in Survey-Based Network Data 296

11.11 Selection Issues 300

11.12 New Directions: Measuring Social Network Dynamics 301

11.13 Further Reading 304

References 304

Online Resources 312

12 New Technologies for Health Survey Research 315
Joe Murphy Elizabeth Dean Craig A. Hill and Ashley Richards

12.1 Introduction 315

12.2 Background 316

12.3 Theory and Applications 318

12.4 Summary 329

References 331

Online Resources 337

13 Using Survey Data to Improve Health: Community Outreach and Collaboration 341
Steven Whitman Ami M. Shah Maureen R. Benjamins and Joseph West

13.1 Introduction 341

13.2 Our Motivation 342

13.3 Our Process 343

13.4 A Few Findings 344

13.5 Case Studies of Community Engagement 349

13.6 Some Lessons Learned 361

References 363

Online Resources 365

14 Proxy Reporting in Health Surveys 367
Joseph W. Sakshaug

14.1 Introduction 367

14.2 Background 367

14.3 Proxy Interviews for Children 370

14.4 Proxy Interviews for the Elderly 372

14.5 Proxy Interviews for the Disabled 374

14.6 Summary 375

References 376

Online Resources 381

15 The Collection of Biospecimens in Health Surveys 383
Joseph W. Sakshaug Mary Beth Ofstedal Heidi Guyer and Timothy J. Beebe

15.1 Introduction 383

15.2 Background 384

15.3 Biomeasure Selection 387

15.4 Methodological and Operational Considerations 397

15.5 Quality Control 402

15.6 Ethical and Legal Considerations 408

15.7 Methods of Data Dissemination 411

15.8 Summary 412

References 413

Online Resources 419

16 Collecting Contextual Health Survey Data Using Systematic Observation 421
Shannon N. Zenk Sandy Slater and Safa Rashid

16.1 Introduction 421

16.2 Background 423

16.3 Data Collection 426

16.4 Reliability and Validity Assessment 429

16.5 Data Analysis 432

16.6 Theory and Applications 432

16.7 BTG-COMP: Evaluating the Impact of the Built Environment on Adolescent Obesity 432

16.8 Evaluating the Impact of a Policy Change on the Retail Fruit and Vegetable Supply 436

16.9 Summary 440

References 441

Online Resources 445

17 Collecting Survey Data on Sensitive Topics: Substance Use 447
Joe Gfroerer and Joel Kennet

17.1 Introduction 447

17.2 Background 448

17.3 Theory and Applications 450

17.4 Validation 463

17.5 Alternative Estimation Methods 464

17.6 Summary 466

References 467

Online Resources 472

18 Collecting Survey Data on Sensitive Topics: Sexual Behavior 473
Tom W. Smith

18.1 Introduction 473

18.2 Sampling 474

18.3 Nonobservation 475

18.4 Observation/Measurement Error 475

18.5 Summary 479

References 479

Online Resources 485

19 Ethical Considerations in Collecting Health Survey Data 487
Emily E. Anderson

19.1 Introduction 487

19.2 Background: Ethical Principles and Federal Regulations for Research 488

19.3 Defining Evaluating and Minimizing Risk 491

19.4 Ethical Review of Health Survey Research 497

19.5 Informed Consent for Survey Participation 500

19.6 Considerations for Data Collection 504

19.7 Summary 505

References 506

Online Resources 510

20 Surveys of Physicians 515
Jonathan B. VanGeest Timothy J. Beebe and Timothy P. Johnson

20.1 Introduction 515

20.2 Why Physicians do not Respond 517

20.3 Theory and Applications: Improving Physician Participation 518

20.4 Sampling 518

20.5 Design-Based Interventions to Improve Response 523

20.6 Incentive-Based Interventions 530

20.7 Supporting Evidence from Other Health Professions 532

20.8 Conclusion 533

References 534

Online Resources 543

21 Surveys of Health Care Organizations 545
John D. Loft Joe Murphy and Craig A. Hill

21.1 Introduction 545

21.2 Examples of Health Care Organizations Surveys 548

21.3 Surveys of Health Care Organizations as Establishment Surveys 548

21.4 Conclusions 556

References 558

Online Resources 560

22 Surveys of Patient Populations 561
Francis Fullam and Jonathan B. VanGeest

22.1 Introduction 561

22.2 Patients and Care Settings 563

22.3 Overview of Common Patient Survey Methodologies 564

22.4 Key Issues in Patient Survey Design and Administration 565

22.5 Strategies for Developing Effective Patient Surveys 570

22.6 Conclusion 573

References 574

Online Resources 583

23 Surveying Sexual and Gender Minorities 585
Melissa A. Clark Samantha Rosenthal and Ulrike Boehmer

23.1 Introduction 585

23.2 Prevalence Estimates of Sexual and Gender Minorities 592

23.3 Sampling and Recruitment 597

23.4 Data Collection 606

23.5 Conclusions 608

References 609

Online Resources 617

24 Surveying People with Disabilities: Moving Toward Better Practices and Policies 619
Rooshey Hasnain Carmit-Noa Shpigelman Mike Scott Jon R. Gunderson Hadi B. Rangin Ashmeet Oberoi and Liam McKeever

24.1 Introduction 620

24.2 Setting a Foundation:The Importance of Inclusion for Web-Based Surveys 623

24.3 Promoting Participation with Web Accessibility 624

24.4 Testing the Accessibility of Some Web-Based Survey Tools 626

24.5 Ensuring Web Accessibility at Various Levels of Disability 629

24.6 Problems Posed By Inaccessible Web-Based Surveys for People with Disabilities 633

24.7 Applications: How to Ensure that Web-Based Surveys are Accessible 634

24.8 Summary and Conclusions 637

References 638

Online Resources 641

25 Assessing the Quality of Health Survey Data Through Modern Test Theory 645
Adam C. Carle

25.1 Introduction 645

25.2 Internal Validity and Dimensionality 647

25.3 Dimensionality and Bifactor Model Example 650

25.4 Dimensionality Discussion 652

25.5 Measurement Bias 653

25.6 Multiple Group Multiple Indicator Multiple Cause Models 655

25.7 Additional Challenges to Health Survey Data Quality 664

25.8 Overall Conclusion 664

References 665

Online Resources 667

26 Sample Weighting for Health Surveys 669
Kennon R. Copeland and Nadarajasundaram Ganesh

26.1 Objectives of Sample Weighting 669

26.2 Sample Weighting Stages (Probability Sample Designs) 670

26.3 Calculating Base Weights 671

26.4 Accounting for Noncontact and Nonresponse 672

26.5 Adjusting to Independent Population Controls 677

26.6 SampleWeighting for Nonprobability Sample Designs 680

26.7 Issues in Sample Weighting 680

26.8 Estimation 682

26.9 Variance Estimation 683

26.10 Special Topics 683

26.11 Example: Weighting for the 2010 National Immunization Survey 685

26.12 Summary 692

References 692

Online Resources 694

27 Merging Survey Data with Administrative Data for Health Research Purposes 695
Michael Davern Marc Roemer and Wendy Thomas

27.1 Introduction 695

27.2 Potential Uses of Linked Data 696

27.3 Limitations and Strengths of Survey Data 699

27.4 Limitations and Strengths of Administrative Data 700

27.5 A Research Agenda into Linked Data File Quality 701

27.6 Conclusions 712

References 713

Online Resources 716

28 Merging Survey Data with Aggregate Data from Other Sources: Opportunities and Challenges 717
Jarvis T. Chen

28.1 Background 717

28.2 Geocoding and Linkage to Area-Based Data 719

28.3 Geographic Levels of Aggregation 720

28.4 Types of Area-Level Measures 723

28.5 Sources of Aggregated Data 724

28.6 Aggregate Data Measures as Proxies for Individual Data 730

28.7 Aggregate Measures as Contextual Variables 731

28.8 The Components of Ecological Bias 732

28.9 Analytic Approaches to the Analysis of Survey Data with Linked Area-Based Measures 742

28.10 Summary 746

References 748

Online Resources 754

29 Analysis of Complex Health Survey Data 755
Stanislav Kolenikov and Jeff Pitblado

29.1 Introduction 755

29.2 Inference with Complex Survey Data 760

29.3 Substantive Analyses 784

29.4 Quality Control Analyses 795

29.5 Discussion 798

References 798

Online Resources 804

Index 805

See More

Author Information

Timothy P. Johnson, PhD, is Director of the Survey Research Laboratory and Professor of Public Administration at the University of Illinois at Chicago (UIC), where he is also Research Professor of Epidemiology and Deputy Director for Evaluation and Tracking of the UIC Center for Clinical and Translational Research. The author of numerous journal articles, Dr. Johnson is Coeditor of Survey Methods in Multicultural, Multinational, and Multiregional Contexts, also published by Wiley.

See More

Reviews

“The extensive and analytical coverage will make the book an extremely valuable resource: the new handbook will certainly emerge as essential reading for anyone deals with health surveys.”  (Ann Ist Super Sanità, 1 October 2015)

See More

Related Titles

Back to Top