Wiley.com
Print this page Share

Low-profile Natural and Metamaterial Antennas: Analysis Methods and Applications

ISBN: 978-1-118-85979-7
304 pages
October 2016, Wiley-IEEE Press
Low-profile Natural and Metamaterial Antennas: Analysis Methods and Applications (1118859790) cover image

Description

Presents recent progress in low-profile natural and metamaterial antennas

This book presents the full range of low-profile antennas that use novel elements and take advantage of new concepts in antenna implementation, including metamaterials. Typically formed by constructing lattices of simple elements, metamaterials possess electromagnetic properties not found in naturally occurring materials, and show great promise in a number of low-profile antenna implementations. Introductory chapters define various natural and metamaterial-based antennas and provide the fundamentals of writing computer programs based on the method of moments (MoM) and the finite-difference time-domain method (FDTDM). Chapters then discuss low-profile natural antennas classified into base station antennas, mobile card antennas, beam-forming antennas, and satellite-satellite and earth-satellite communications antennas. Final chapters look at various properties of low-profile metamaterial-based antennas, revealing the strengths and limitations of the metamaterial-based straight line antenna (metaline antenna), metamaterial-based loop antenna (metaloop), open metaloop antenna, the effects of counter dual-band CP radiation, and more. 

  • Offers comprehensive coverage of both metamaterials and natural materials for low-profile antennas
  • Written by an internationally-recognized expert in the field of low-profile antennas
  • Depicts actual high-performance low-profile antennas for the antenna engineer
  • Draws on classroom-tested material in graduate courses and short courses over the past 20 years

 Low-Profile Natural and Metamaterial Antennas is a must-have reference book for advanced undergraduate and graduate level students as well as antenna engineers interested in low-profile antenna design theory.

See More

Table of Contents

Preface xi

Acknowledgments xv

Part I Introduction 1

1. Categorization of Natural Materials and Metamaterials 3

1.1 Natural and Metamaterial Antennas Discussed in This Book 3

1.2 Some Antenna Examples 6

References 8

2. Integral Equations and Method of Moments 11

2.1 Basic Antenna Characteristics 11

2.2 Integral Equation on a Straight-Wire Antenna 15

2.3 Method of Moments 16

2.4 Integral Equation for an Arbitrarily Shaped Wire Antenna in Free Space 19

2.5 Point-Matching Technique 22

2.6 Integral Equation N1 for an Arbitrarily Shaped Wire Antenna: Closed Kernel Expression 23

2.7 Integral Equations N2 and N3 for an Antenna System Composed of an Arbitrarily Shaped Wire and an  Arbitrarily Shaped Aperture and Their MoM Transformation 27

2.8 Integral Equation N4 for an Arbitrarily Shaped Wire Antenna on a Dielectric Substrate Backed by a Conducting Plane and Its MoM Transformation 34

2.9 Integral Equation N5 for an Arbitrarily Shaped Wire Antenna on a Dielectric Half-Space and Its Transformation Using a Finite-Difference Technique 41

References 46

3. Finite-Difference Time-Domain Methods (FDTDMs) 49

3.1 Basis 49

3.2 LOD–FDTD Method 52

References 57

Part II Low-Profile Natural Antennas 59

Part II-1 Base Station Antennas 61

4. Inverted-F Antennas 63

4.1 Inverted-F Antenna with a Single Parasitic Inverted-L Element 63

4.2 Inverted-F Antenna with a Pair of Parasitic Inverted-L Elements 67

References 73

5. Multiloop Antennas 75

5.1 Discrete Multiloop (ML) Antennas 75

5.2 Modified Multiloop Antennas 78

5.3 Plate-Loop (PL) Antenna 82

References 83

6. Fan-Shaped Antenna 85

6.1 Wideband Input Impedance 85

6.2 Characteristics of The Fan-Shaped Antenna 86

6.3 Cross Fan-Shaped Antenna (X-Fan Antenna) 87

6.4 Cross Fan-Shaped Antenna Surrounded By a Wire (X-Fan-W) 89

6.5 Cross Fan-Shaped Antenna with Slots (X-Fan-S) 92

References 93

7. BOR–SPR Antenna 95

7.1 Configuration 95

7.2 Antenna Input Characteristics of Initial Patch, Patch-Slot, and PSP Antennas 97

7.3 Replacement of The Patch Island with a Conducting Body of Revolution (BOR) 99

References 103

Part II-2 Card Antennas for Mobile Equipment 105

8. Inverted LFL Antenna for Dual-Band Operation 107

8.1 Configuration 107

8.2 Design 107

References 114

9. Fan-Shaped Card Antenna 117

9.1 Configuration 117

9.2 Antenna Characteristics 118

References 123

10. Planar Monopole Card Antenna 125

10.1 Ant-1 and Ant-2 125

10.2 Ant-3 and Ant-4 127

References 131

Part II-3 Beam forming Antennas 133

11. Inverted-F Antenna Above an Electromagnetic Band-Gap Reflector 135

11.1 Inverted-F Array with an EBG Reflector (EBG-InvF Array) 135

11.2 Antenna Characteristics 136

References 140

12. Reconfigurable Bent Two-Leaf and Four-Leaf Antennas 143

12.1 BeToL Antenna 143

12.2 BeFoL Antenna 153

References 160

13. Patch Antenna with a Nonuniform Loop Plate 163

13.1 Antenna System 163

13.2 Reference Gain and Broadside Radiation—Placement of a Homogeneneous PerioAEs Plate 166

13.3 Gradation Constant and Tilted Radiation Beam—Placement of a Nonhomogeneous PerioAEs Plate 168

13.4 Gain 170

References 173

14. Linearly Polarized Rhombic Grid Array Antenna 175

14.1 Configuration 175

14.2 Radiation Pattern and Gain 177

14.3 VSWR Characteristic 183

References 183

15. Circularly Polarized Grid Array Antenna 185

15.1 Configuration of a Prototype Loop-Based CP GAAEDG 185

15.2 Radiation Characteristics of The Prototype Loop-Based CP GAAEDG 188

15.3 Configuration of an Advanced Loop-Based CP GAAEDG 191

15.4 Radiation Characteristics of The Advanced Loop-Based CP GAAEDG 192

References 198

Part II-4 Earth–Satellite and Satellite–Satellite Communications Antennas 199

16. Monofilar Spiral Antenna Array 201

16.1 Tilted-Beam Monofilar Spiral Antenna 201

16.2 Tilted CP Fan Beam 206

References 209

17. Low-Profile Helical Antenna Array 211

17.1 Array Element 211

17.2 Array Antenna 213

17.3 Application Examples 219

References 221

18. Curl Antennas 223

18.1 High-Gain Normal-Beam Array Antenna Composed of Internal-Excitation Curl Elements 223

18.2 High-Gain Tilted-Beam Array Antenna Composed of External-Excitation Curl Elements 229

References 236

Part III Low-Profile Metamaterial Antennas 237

19. Metaline Antenna 239

19.1 Unit Cell 239

19.2 Natural Characteristic Impedance ZNTR, Bloch Impedance ZB, and Phase Constant β 240

19.3 Two-Metaline Antennas 243

References 246

20. Metaloop Antenna for Linearly Polarized Radiation 247

20.1 Metaloop Configuration 247

20.2 Single- and Dual-Peak Beams 249

References 253

21. Circularly Polarized Metaloop Antenna 255

21.1 Configuration 255

21.2 Counter-CP Radiation 255

References 260

22. Metaspiral Antenna 261

22.1 Circularly Polarized Radiation 261

22.2 Linearly Polarized Radiation 266

References 271

23. Metahelical Antennas 273

23.1 Round Metahelical Antenna 273

23.2 Rectangular Metahelical Antenna 276

References 282

Index 283

See More

Author Information

Hisamatsu Nakano is Professor in the Department of Electrical and Electronics, Science and Engineering at Hosei University, Tokyo, Japan. Professor Nakano received the 2010 Prize for Science and Technology from Japan's Minister of Education, Culture, Sports, Science, and Technology, and is the holder of 78 patents, author of over 300 papers, and a Life Fellow of the IEEE.

See More
Back to Top