Wiley.com
Print this page Share

Biosensors and Nanotechnology: Applications in Health Care Diagnostics

Zeynep Altintas (Editor)
ISBN: 978-1-119-06501-2
400 pages
December 2017
Biosensors and Nanotechnology: Applications in Health Care Diagnostics (1119065011) cover image

Description

Provides a broad range of information from basic principles to advanced applications of biosensors and nanomaterials in health care diagnostics

This book utilizes a multidisciplinary approach to provide a wide range of information on biosensors and the impact of nanotechnology on the development of biosensors for health care. It offers a solid background on biosensors, recognition receptors, biomarkers, and disease diagnostics. An overview of biosensor-based health care applications is addressed. Nanomaterial applications in biosensors and diagnostics are included, covering the application of nanoparticles, magnetic nanomaterials, quantum dots, carbon nanotubes, graphene, and molecularly imprinted nanostructures. The topic of organ-specific health care systems utilizing biosensors is also incorporated to provide deep insight into the very recent advances in disease diagnostics.

Biosensors and Nanotechnology: Applications in Health Care Diagnostics is comprised of 15 chapters that are presented in four sections and written by 33 researchers who are actively working in Germany, the United Kingdom, Italy, Turkey, Denmark, Finland, Romania, Malaysia and Brazil. It covers biomarkers in healthcare; microfluidics in medical diagnostics; SPR-based biosensor techniques; piezoelectric-based biosensor technologies; MEMS-based cell counting methods; lab-on-chip platforms; optical applications for cancer cases; and more. 

  • Discusses the latest technology and advances in the field of biosensors and their applications for healthcare diagnostics
  • Particular focus on biosensors for cancer
  • Summarizes research of the last 30 years, relating it to state-of-the-art technologies

Biosensors and Nanotechnology: Applications in Health Care Diagnostics is an excellent book for researchers, scientists, regulators, consultants, and engineers in the field, as well as for graduate students studying the subject.

See More

Table of Contents

List of Contributors xi

Preface xv

Acknowledgments xvii

Section 1 Introduction to Biosensors, Recognition Elements, Biomarkers, and Nanomaterials 1

1 General Introduction to Biosensors and Recognition Receptors 3
Frank Davis and Zeynep Altintas

1.1 Introduction to Biosensors 3

1.2 Enzyme‐ Based Biosensors 4

1.3 DNA‐ and RNA‐Based Biosensors 5

1.4 Antibody‐Based Biosensors 7

1.5 Aptasensors 8

1.6 Peptide‐Based Biosensors 10

1.7 MIP‐Based Biosensor 11

1.8 Conclusions 12

References 13

2 Biomarkers in Health Care 17
Adama Marie Sesay, Pirkko Tervo, and Elisa Tikkanen

2.1 Introduction 17

2.2 Biomarkers 18

2.2.1 Advantage and Utilization of Biomarkers 18

2.2.2 Ideal Characteristics of Biomarkers 19

2.3 Biological Samples and Biomarkers 20

2.4 Personalized Health and Point‐of‐Care Technology 22

2.5 Use of Biomarkers in Biosensing Technology 24

2.6 Biomarkers in Disease Diagnosis 26

2.7 Conclusions 29

References 30

3 The Use of Nanomaterials and Microfluidics in Medical Diagnostics 35
Jon Ashley and Yi Sun

3.1 Introduction 35

3.2 Nanomaterials in Medical Diagnostics (Bottom‐Up Approach) 36

3.2.1 Carbon Nanomaterials 37

3.2.2 Metallic Nanoparticles 39

3.2.2.1 Quantum Dots 39

3.2.2.2 Magnetic Nanoparticles (Fe2O3, FeO, and Fe3O4) 41

3.2.2.3 Gold Nanoparticles 41

3.2.2.4 Silver Nanoparticles 42

3.2.2.5 Nanoshells 42

3.2.2.6 Nanocages 43

3.2.2.7 Nanowires 43

3.2.3 Polymer‐Based Nanoparticles 44

3.3 Application of Microfluidic Devices in Clinical Diagnostics (Top‐Down Approach) 45

3.3.1 Unique Features of Microfluidic Devices 45

3.3.2 Applications of Microfluidic Devices in Medical Diagnostics 46

3.3.2.1 Types of Microfluidic POC Devices 47

3.3.2.2 Benchtop Microfluidic Instruments 47

3.3.2.3 Small, Lightweight Microfluidic Devices 49

3.3.2.4 Simple Un‐instrumented Microfluidic Systems 50

3.4 Integration of Microfluidics with Nanomaterials 52

3.5 Future Perspectives of Nanomaterial and Microfluidic‐Based Diagnostics 53

References 54

Section 2 Biosensor Platforms for Disease Detection and Diagnostics 59

4 SPR‐Based Biosensor Technologies in Disease Detection and Diagnostics 61
Zeynep Altintas and Wellington M. Fakanya

4.1 Introduction 61

4.2 Basic Theoretical Principles 63

4.3 SPR Applications in Disease Detection and Diagnostics 66

4.3.1 SPR Biosensors in Cancer Detection 66

4.3.2 SPR Sensors in Cardiac Disease Detection 68

4.3.3 SPR Sensors in Infectious Disease Detection 71

4.4 Conclusions 72

References 74

5 Piezoelectric‐Based Biosensor Technologies in Disease Detection and Diagnostics 77
Zeynep Altintas and Noor Azlina Masdor

5.1 Introduction 77

5.2 QCM Biosensors 78

5.3 Disease Diagnosis Using QCM Biosensors 80

5.3.1 Cancer Detection Using QCM Biosensors 82

5.3.2 Cardiovascular System Disorder Detection Using Biosensors 85

5.3.3 Pathogenic Disease Detection Using QCM Biosensors 88

5.4 Conclusions 90

References 91

6 Electrochemical‐Based Biosensor Technologies in Disease Detection and Diagnostics 95
Andrea Ravalli and Giovanna Marrazza

6.1 Introduction 95

6.2 Electrochemical Biosensors: Definitions, Principles, and Classifications 96

6.3 Biomarkers in Clinical Applications 102

6.3.1 Electrochemical Biosensors for Tumor Markers 102

6.3.2 Electrochemical Biosensors for Cardiac Markers 110

6.3.3 Electrochemical Biosensors for Autoimmune Disease 115

6.3.4 Electrochemical Biosensors for Autoimmune Infectious Disease 116

6.4 Conclusions 118

References 118

7 MEMS‐Based Cell Counting Methods 125
Mustafa Kangul, Eren Aydın, Furkan Gokce, Ozge Zorlu, Ebru Ozgur, and Haluk Kulah

7.1 Introduction 125

7.2 MEMS‐Based Cell Counting Methods 126

7.2.1 Optical Cell Counting Methods 126

7.2.1.1 Quantification of the Cells by Detecting Luminescence 127

7.2.1.2 Quantification of the Cells via High‐Resolution Imaging Techniques 130

7.3 Electrical and Electrochemical Cell Counting Methods 131

7.3.1 Impedimetric Cell Quantification 133

7.3.2 Voltammetric and Amperometric Cell Quantification 135

7.4 Gravimetric Cell Counting Methods 136

7.4.1 Deflection‐Based Cell Quantification 136

7.4.2 Resonant‐Based Cell Quantification 138

7.4.2.1 Theory of the Resonant‐Based Sensors 138

7.4.2.2 Actuation and Sensing Methods of Resonators in MEMS Applications 140

7.4.2.3 Resonator Structure Types Used for Cell Detection Applications 145

7.5 Conclusion and Comments 149

References 151

8 Lab‐on‐a‐Chip Platforms for Disease Detection and Diagnosis 155
Ziya Isiksacan, Mustafa Tahsin Guler, Ali Kalantarifard, Mohammad Asghari, and Caglar Elbuken

8.1 Introduction 155

8.2 Continuous Flow Platforms 156

8.3 Paper‐Based LOC Platforms 161

8.4 Droplet‐Based LOC Platforms 166

8.5 Digital Microfluidic‐Based LOC Platforms 169

8.6 CD‐Based LOC Platforms 172

8.7 Wearable LOC Platforms 174

8.8 Conclusion and Outlook 176

References 177

Section 3 Nanomaterial’s Applications in

Biosensors and Diagnostics 183

9 Applications of Quantum Dots in Biosensors and Diagnostics 185
Zeynep Altintas, Frank Davis, and Frieder W. Scheller

9.1 Introduction 185

9.2 Quantum Dots: Optical Properties, Synthesis, and Surface Chemistry 186

9.3 Biosensor Applications of QDs 187

9.4 Other Biological Applications of QDs 191

9.5 Water Solubility and Cytotoxicity 194

9.6 Conclusion 196

References 197

10 Applications of Molecularly Imprinted Nanostructures in Biosensors and Diagnostics 201
Deniz Aktas‐Uygun, Murat Uygun, and Sinan Akgol

10.1 Introduction 201

10.2 Molecular Imprinted Polymers 202

10.3 Imprinting Approaches 204

10.4 Molecularly Imprinted Nanostructures 205

10.5 MIP Biosensors in Medical Diagnosis 207

10.6 Diagnostic Applications of MIP Nanostructures 210

10.7 Conclusions 212

References 213

11 Smart Nanomaterials: Applications in Biosensors and Diagnostics 219
Frank Davis, Flavio M. Shimizu, and Zeynep Altintas

11.1 Introduction 219

11.2 Metal Nanoparticles 221

11.3 Magnetic Nanoparticles 226

11.4 Carbon Nanotubes 231

11.5 Graphene 235

11.6 Nanostructured Metal Oxides 242

11.7 Nanostructured Hydrogels 247

11.8 Nanostructured Conducting Polymers 254

11.9 Conclusions and Future Trends 260

References 262

12 Applications of Magnetic Nanomaterials in Biosensors and Diagnostics 277
Zeynep Altintas

12.1 Introduction 277

12.2 MNP‐Based Biosensors for Disease Detection 279

12.3 MNPs in Cancer Diagnosis and Therapy 284

12.4 Cellular Applications of MNPs in Biosensing, Imaging, and Therapy 289

12.5 Conclusions 290

References 291

13 Graphene Applications in Biosensors and Diagnostics 297
Adina Arvinte and Adama Marie Sesay

13.1 Introduction 297

13.2 Graphene and Biosensors 298

13.2.1 Structure 298

13.2.2 Preparation 299

13.2.3 Properties 301

13.2.4 Commercialization in the Field of Graphene Sensors 302

13.2.5 Latest Developments in Graphene‐based Diagnosis 303

13.3 Medical Applications of Graphene 303

13.3.1 Electrochemical Graphene Biosensors for Medical Diagnostics 304

13.3.1.1 Glucose Detection 304

13.3.1.2 Cysteine Detection 307

13.3.1.3 Cholesterol Detection 309

13.3.1.4 Hydrogen Peroxide (H2O2) 310

13.3.1.5 Glycated Hemoglobin 312

13.3.1.6 Neurotransmitters 312

13.3.1.7 Amyloid‐Beta Peptide 315

13.3.2 Electrochemical Graphene Aptasensors 316

13.3.2.1 Nucleic Acids 316

13.3.2.2 Cancer Cell 318

13.3.3 Optical Graphene Sensors for Medical Diagnostics 319

13.4 Conclusions 322

Acknowledgments 322

References 322

Section 4 Organ-Specific Health Care Applications for Disease Cases Using Biosensors 327

14 Optical Biosensors and Applications to Drug Discovery for Cancer Cases 329
Zeynep Altintas

14.1 Introduction 329

14.2 Biosensor Technology and Coupling Chemistries 332

14.3 Optical Biosensors for Drug Discovery 335

14.4 Computational Simulations and New Approaches for Drug–Receptor Interactions 341

14.5 Conclusions 343

References 344

15 Biosensors for Detection of Anticancer Drug–DNA Interactions 349
Arzum Erdem, Ece Eksin, and Ece Kesici

15.1 Introduction 349

15.2 Electrochemical Techniques 351

15.3 Optical Techniques 356

15.4 Electrochemical Impedance Spectroscopy Technique 358

15.5 QCM Technique 360

15.6 Conclusions 361

Acknowledgments 361

References 361

Index

See More

Author Information

ZEYNEP ALTINTAS, PhD, is the head of the Biosensors and Receptor Development Group at the Technical University of Berlin, Germany. She serves as an expert reviewer for EU and Wisconsin Groundwater Coordinating Council (USA) funded projects, in addition to acting as a reviewer for several important journals in her areas of expertise. She is also a member of the Royal Society of Chemistry (RSC).

See More

Related Titles

Back to Top