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Introduction to Electrical Circuit Analysis

ISBN: 978-1-119-28493-2
422 pages
June 2017
Introduction to Electrical Circuit Analysis (1119284937) cover image

Description

A concise and original presentation of the fundamentals for ‘new to the subject’ electrical engineers

This book has been written for students on electrical engineering courses who don’t necessarily possess prior knowledge of electrical circuits.  Based on the author’s own teaching experience, it covers the analysis of simple electrical circuits consisting of a few essential components using fundamental and well-known methods and techniques. Although the above content has been included in other circuit analysis books, this one aims at teaching young engineers not only from electrical and electronics engineering, but also from other areas, such as mechanical engineering, aerospace engineering, mining engineering, and chemical engineering, with unique pedagogical features such as a puzzle-like approach and negative-case examples (such as the unique “When Things Go Wrong…” section at the end of each chapter).  Believing that the traditional texts in this area can be overwhelming for beginners, the author approaches his subject by providing numerous examples for the student to solve and practice before learning more complicated components and circuits.  These exercises and problems will provide instructors with in-class activities and tutorials, thus establishing this book as the perfect complement to the more traditional texts.

  • All examples and problems contain detailed analysis of various circuits, and are solved using a ‘recipe’ approach, providing a code that motivates students to decode and apply to real-life engineering scenarios
  • Covers the basic topics of resistors, voltage and current sources, capacitors and inductors, Ohm’s and Kirchhoff’s Laws, nodal and mesh analysis, black-box approach, and Thevenin/Norton equivalent circuits for both DC and AC cases in transient and steady states
  • Aims to stimulate interest and discussion in the basics, before moving on to more modern circuits with higher-level components
  • Includes more than 130 solved examples and 120 detailed exercises with supplementary solutions
  • Accompanying website to provide supplementary materials www.wiley.com/go/ergul4412
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Table of Contents

Important Units xi

Conventions with Examples xiii

Preface xv

About the CompanionWebsite xix

1 Introduction 1

1.1 Circuits and Important Quantities 1

1.1.1 Electric Charge 1

1.1.2 Electric Potential (Voltage) 3

1.1.3 Electric Current 4

1.1.4 Electric Voltage and Current in Electrical Circuits 5

1.1.5 Electric Energy and Power of a Component 6

1.1.6 DC and AC Signals 7

1.1.7 Transient State and Steady State 8

1.1.8 Frequency in Circuits 9

1.2 Resistance and Resistors 9

1.2.1 Current Types, Conductance, and Ohm’s Law 10

1.2.2 Good Conductors and Insulators 10

1.2.3 Semiconductors 11

1.2.4 Superconductivity and Perfect Conductivity 11

1.2.5 Resistors as Circuit Components 12

1.3 Independent Sources 13

1.4 Dependent Sources 14

1.5 Basic Connections of Components 15

1.6 Limitations in Circuit Analysis 19

1.7 What You Need to Know before You Continue 20

2 Basic Tools: Kirchhoff’s Laws 23

2.1 Kirchhoff’s Current Law 23

2.2 Kirchhoff’s Voltage Law 24

2.3 WhenThings GoWrong with KCL and KVL 36

2.4 Series and Parallel Connections of Resistors 40

2.4.1 Series Connection 40

2.4.2 Parallel Connection 41

2.5 WhenThings GoWrong with Series/Parallel Resistors 45

2.6 What You Need to Know before You Continue 46

3 Analysis of Resistive Networks: Nodal Analysis 47

3.1 Application of Nodal Analysis 47

3.2 Concept of Supernode 59

3.3 Circuits with Multiple Independent Voltage Sources 72

3.4 Solving Challenging Problems Using Nodal Analysis 74

3.5 WhenThings GoWrong with Nodal Analysis 86

3.6 What You Need to Know before You Continue 90

4 Analysis of Resistive Networks: Mesh Analysis 93

4.1 Application of Mesh Analysis 93

4.2 Concept of Supermesh 107

4.3 Circuits with Multiple Independent Current Sources 121

4.4 Solving Challenging Problems Using the Mesh Analysis 122

4.5 WhenThings GoWrong with Mesh Analysis 135

4.6 What You Need to Know before You Continue 137

5 Black-Box Concept 139

5.1 Thévenin and Norton Equivalent Circuits 139

5.2 Maximum Power Transfer 158

5.3 Shortcuts in Equivalent Circuits 173

5.4 WhenThings GoWrong with Equivalent Circuits 176

5.5 What You Need to Know before You Continue 178

6 Transient Analysis 181

6.1 Capacitance and Capacitors 181

6.2 Inductance and Inductors 191

6.3 Time-Dependent Analysis of Circuits in Transient State 195

6.3.1 Time-Dependent Analysis of RC Circuits 195

6.3.2 Time-Dependent Analysis of RL Circuits 204

6.3.3 Impossible Cases 207

6.4 Switching and Fixed-Time Analysis 208

6.5 Parallel and Series Connections of Capacitors and Inductors 218

6.5.1 Connections of Capacitors 218

6.5.2 Connections of Inductors 220

6.6 WhenThings GoWrong in Transient Analysis 222

6.7 What You Need to Know before You Continue 224

7 Steady-State Analysis of Time-Harmonic Circuits 227

7.1 Steady-State Concept 227

7.2 Time-Harmonic Circuits with Sinusoidal Sources 228

7.2.1 Resistors Connected to Sinusoidal Sources 229

7.2.2 Capacitors Connected to Sinusoidal Sources 230

7.2.3 Inductors Connected to Sinusoidal Sources 231

7.2.4 Root-Mean-Square Concept 232

7.3 Concept of Phasor Domain and Component Transformation 234

7.3.1 Resistors in Phasor Domain 236

7.3.2 Capacitors in Phasor Domain 236

7.3.3 Inductors in Phasor Domain 237

7.3.4 Impedance Concept 238

7.4 Special Circuits in Phasor Domain 243

7.4.1 RC Circuits in Phasor Domain 243

7.4.2 RL Circuits in Phasor Domain 244

7.4.3 RLC Circuits in Phasor Domain 246

7.4.4 Other Combinations 247

7.5 Analysis of Complex Circuits at Fixed Frequencies 248

7.6 Power in Steady State 259

7.6.1 Instantaneous and Average Power 259

7.6.2 Complex Power 260

7.6.3 Impedance Matching 266

7.7 WhenThings GoWrong in Steady-State Analysis 271

7.8 What You Need to Know before You Continue 274

8 Selected Components of Modern Circuits 275

8.1 When Connections Are via Magnetic Fields: Transformers 275

8.2 When Components Behave Differently from Two Sides: Diodes 278

8.3 When Components Involve Many Connections: OP-AMPs 284

8.4 When Circuits Become Modern: Transistors 288

8.5 When Components Generate Light: LEDs 293

8.6 Conclusion 294

9 Practical Technologies in Modern Circuits 295

9.1 Measurement Instruments 295

9.2 Three-Phase Power Delivery 297

9.3 AD and DA Converters 300

9.4 Logic Gates 303

9.5 Memory Units 307

9.6 Conclusion 309

10 Next Steps 311

10.1 Energy Is Conserved, Always! 311

10.2 Divide and Conquer Complex Circuits 313

10.3 Appreciate the Package 314

10.4 Consider Yourself as a Circuit Element 316

10.5 Safety First 317

11 Photographs of Some Circuit Elements 321

A Appendix 325

A.1 Basic Algebra Identities 325

A.2 Trigonometry 325

A.3 Complex Numbers 325

B Solutions to Exercises 327

Index 401

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Author Information

By Özgür Ergül, Associate Professor, Middle East Technical University, Ankara, Turkey

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Instructors Resources
Wiley Instructor Companion Site
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