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The Reading Mind: A Cognitive Approach to Understanding How the Mind Reads

ISBN: 978-1-119-30137-0
256 pages
May 2017, Jossey-Bass
The Reading Mind: A Cognitive Approach to Understanding How the Mind Reads (1119301378) cover image

Description

PRAISE FOR THE READING MIND

"Willingham's ability to make cognitive research on reading coherent and comprehensible is exceptional. This book should be standard fare in every doctoral education course on reading." —Isabel L. Beck, Professor Emerita, School of Education, University of Pittsburgh

"This is another of Willingham's essential books for educational professionals, and anyone else interested in the reading process—telling them the cognitive science and practical implications of research in the domain of reading. No one does this kind of book better than Willingham!" —Keith E. Stanovich, author of Progress in Understanding Reading and The Rationality Quotient

"Willingham captures the magic of reading while simultaneously demystifying how we read. He brings key experimental findings to light as he takes us on the journey from recognizing individual words to constructing meaning from text. Beautifully written, clear and accessible, yet still embracing complexities rather than shying away from them—this book is essential reading for anyone interested in how we read." —Kate Nation, professor of Experimental Psychology, University of Oxford; fellow and tutor in Psychology, St. John's College

"What goes on in the mind as we read? How do people learn to read? What motivates some to read more than others? For those curious about these questions, and for those who care about children learning to read and growing as readers, this delightful book explains this highly complex topic through fascinating studies and lively examples. With probing questions included, The Reading Mind will make a terrific book club read or textbook." —Ellen McIntyre, dean and professor, College of Education, University of North Carolina, Charlotte

"Willingham's work will deepen your understanding of the many facets of reading and literacy, as well as how the brain processes what amounts to an astoundingly complex and historically unlikely process. This book should be required reading for anyone with a vested interest in the written word." —Kristofor Lauricella, History teacher, High School for Youth & Community Development, Brooklyn, New York

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Table of Contents

Tables and Figures xiii

About the Author xv

Acknowledgment xvii

Introduction: The Chicken Milanese Problem 1

1 On Your Marks 13

2 Sound It Out 27

3 Reading at a Glance 55

4 Words, Words, Words 77

5 Reading Comprehension 105

6 Becoming a Reader 135

7 Reading After the Digital Revolution 159

Conclusion: The Utility of Theory 187

Works Cited 201

Index 229

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Author Information

DANIEL T. WILLINGHAM, PHD, is professor of psychology at the University of Virginia. His bestselling first book, Why Don't Students Like School?, was hailed as "brilliant analysis" by The Wall Street Journal and "a triumph" by The Washington Post, recommended by scores of education-related magazines and blogs, and translated into many languages. His second book, When Can You Trust the Experts? How to Tell Good Science from Bad in Education, was named recommended reading by Nature and Scientific American, and made Choice's list of outstanding academic titles for 2013. His companion to this book, Raising Kids Who Read, garnered recognition from NPR and Learning & the Brain. Willingham writes a regular column called Ask the Cognitive Scientist for the American Federation of Teachers' magazine, American Educator. In 2017, Willingham was named by President Obama to the National Board for Education Sciences. He received a BA from Duke University and a PhD from Harvard University.

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