Wiley.com
Print this page Share
E-book

Enablers for Smart Cities

ISBN: 978-1-119-32999-2
268 pages
July 2016, Wiley-ISTE
Enablers for Smart Cities (111932999X) cover image

Description

Smart cities are a new vision for urban development.  They integrate information and communication technology infrastructures – in the domains of artificial intelligence, distributed and cloud computing, and sensor networks – into a city, to facilitate quality of life for its citizens and sustainable growth.  This book explores various concepts for the development of these new technologies (including agent-oriented programming, broadband infrastructures, wireless sensor networks, Internet-based networked applications, open data and open platforms), and how they can provide smart services and enablers in a range of public domains.

The most significant research, both established and emerging, is brought together to enable academics and practitioners to investigate the possibilities of smart cities, and to generate the knowledge and solutions required to develop and maintain them.

See More

Table of Contents

Preface  xi
Amal EL FALLAH SEGHROUCHNI, Fuyuki ISHIKAWA and Kenji TEI

Introduction xvii
Amal EL FALLAH SEGHROUCHNI, Fuyuki ISHIKAWA and Kenji TEI

Chapter 1. Shared Wireless Sensor Networks as Enablers for a Context Management System in Smart Cities  1
Kenji TEI

1.1. Introduction  1

1.2. Background 3

1.3. XAC middleware 5

1.3.1. Architecture of XAC middleware  6

1.4. Task-description language  7

1.4.1. Existing solutions 8

1.4.2. XAC middleware solutions 10

1.5. Runtime task management  12

1.5.1. Existing solutions 12

1.5.2. XAC middleware solutions 14

1.6. Self-adaptation 16

1.6.1. Existing solutions 17

1.6.2. XAC middleware solutions 17

1.7. Discussion 18

1.8. Conclusion 19

1.9 Bibliography  19

Chapter 2. Sensorizer: An Architecture for Regenerating Cyber-physical Data Streams from the Web 23
Jin NAKAZAWA

2.1. Introduction  23

2.2. Sensorizer architecture  25

2.2.1. Sensing process of EWC 25

2.2.2. Sensorizer architecture  25

2.3. Implementation  27

2.3.1. Sensorizer browser extension  27

2.3.2. Probe  28

2.3.3. Sensorizer/SoX API 29

2.4. Case of sensorized smart cities  29

2.5. Conclusion 32

2.6. Bibliography  32

Chapter 3. Smart Agent Foundations: From Planning to Spatio-temporal Guidance  33
Ahmed-Chawki CHAOUCHE, Amal EL FALLAH SEGHROUCHNI, Jean-Michel ILIÉ and Djamel Eddine SAÏDOUNI

3.1. Introduction  33

3.2. Smart-campus: use case and scenario  35

3.2.1. Smart-campus architecture  36

3.2.2. Scenario  37

3.3. Description of the software architecture for a smart ambient agent  37

3.4. Higher order agent model 38

3.4.1. Application to the scenario  39

3.5. Description of the concurrent planner based on AgLOTOS language  40

3.5.1. Agent plan structure 40

3.5.2. Syntax of AgLOTOS plans 42

3.5.3. Building of the agent plan from the intentions 44

3.5.4. Planning state of the agent  45

3.6. Contextual planning guidance  45

3.6.1. Semantics of AgLOTOS plans  46

3.6.2. Contextual planning system 48

3.6.3. Application to the scenario  50

3.7. Spatio-temporal guidance from past experiences  52

3.7.1. Contextual planning architecture  52

3.7.2. Learning actions from past experiences 53

3.7.3. Spatio-temporal guidance  58

3.8. Conclusion 61

3.9. Bibliography 62

Chapter 4. A Multi-Agent Middleware for Deployment of Ambient Applications 65
Ferdinand PIETTE, Amal EL FALLAH SEGHROUCHNI, Patrick TAILLIBERT, Costin CAVAL and CÉDRIC DINONT

4.1. Introduction  65

4.2. Challenges for ambient intelligence and Internet of Things  67

4.2.1. Toward the heterogeneity of hardware and protocols 67

4.2.2. Data transport and processing  69

4.2.3. Management of data privacy 71

4.3. Deployment of applications for ambient systems  73

4.3.1. Reasoning about heterogeneity 73

4.3.2. Graph modeling  74

4.3.3. Mathematical formalization of the deployment process  76

4.3.4. Modified graph-matching algorithm  81

4.3.5. Conclusion 85

4.4. Multi-agent middleware for ambient systems  86

4.4.1. Scenario  87

4.4.2. Multi-agent modeling 88

4.4.3. Distributed reasoning 92

4.4.4. Design and implementation 96

4.5. Conclusion 102

4.6. Bibliography  103

Chapter 5. ClouT: Cloud of Things for Empowering Citizen’s Clout in Smart Cities 107
Kenji TEI, Levent GÜREEN and TAKURO YONEZAWA

5.1. Objective of the ClouT project  107

5.2. Goal of the ClouT project 109

5.3. ClouT concept 110

5.3.1. CIaaS concept 112

5.3.2. CPaaS concept  115

5.3.3. CSaaS concept  117

5.4. ClouT reference architecture 118

5.4.1. CIaaS components  118

5.4.2. CPaaS components  120

5.4.3. Security and Dependability components  121

5.5. Mapping the architecture 122

5.6. Conclusion 125

5.7. Bibliography  126

Chapter 6. sensiNact IoT Platform as a Service 127
Levent GÜRGEN, Christophe MUNILLA, Rémi DRUILHE, Etienne GANDRILLE and Jander BOTELHO DO NASCIMENTO

6.1. Introduction  128

6.2. State of the art 130

6.2.1. IoT solutions architectures  130

6.2.2. Existing IoT platforms  131

6.3. Architecture and data model 133

6.4. Platform security management  138

6.5. The sensiNact studio  140

6.5.1. Graphical user interface 141

6.5.2. Creating applications 143

6.5.3. Application deployment 144

6.6. Conclusion 146

6.7. Bibliography  146

Chapter 7. Verification and Configuration of Smart Space Applications  149
Fuyuki ISHIKAWA and Shinichi HONIDEN

7.1. Introduction  149

7.2. Conflicts in smart space applications  150

7.2.1. Event-driven control of smart spaces 150

7.2.2. Description of event-driven behavior 151

7.2.3. Conflicts in event-driven control 151

7.2.4. Application of model checking techniques 153

7.3. Framework for verifying and configuring smart space applications  154

7.3.1. Overview 154

7.3.2. Semantic model  155

7.3.3. Definition of state transition model 158

7.3.4. Properties to verify  159

7.3.5. Implementation  160

7.3.6. Model checker implementation 161

7.4. Case study 161

7.4.1. Scenario and initial specification  161

7.4.2. Analyzing sound conflicts  162

7.4.3. Further scenarios 164

7.5. Related work  164

7.6. Concluding remarks  165

7.7. Acknowledgments 166

7.8. Bibliography  166

Chapter 8. SmartSantander: A Massive Self-Managed, Scalable and Interconnected IoT Deployment 169
José Antonio GALACHE, Juan Ramón SANTANA and Luis MUÑOZ

8.1. Introduction  169

8.2. SmartSantander: novel architecture for service provision and experimentation 170

8.3. SmartSantander deployment: use cases 173

8.4. SmartSantander interacting with ClouT 175

8.4.1. IoT device naming  176

8.4.2. IoT device description  177

8.4.3. IoT resource manager 181

8.4.4. Virtualization module 182

8.5. Conclusions  184

8.6. Bibliography  185

Chapter 9. Using Context-aware Multi-agent Systems for Robust Smart City Infrastructure 187
Andrei OLARU, Adina Magda FLOREA and Amal EL FALLAH SEGHROUCHNI

9.1. Introduction  187

9.1.1. Smart cities and ambient intelligence  188

9.2. Requirements  189

9.2.1. Information at the right time 191

9.2.2. Robustness, reliability, dependability and trust  192

9.2.3. Privacy and personal information  192

9.3. Solutions for managing context information  193

9.3.1. Related work and projects  193

9.3.2. A local solution for a global result 195

9.4. MAS-based application-independent middleware 196

9.4.1. Architecture  198

9.4.2. Generality of the design 203

9.4.3. Resilience in case of failures 203

9.5. Conclusion 204

9.6. Bibliography  204

Chapter 10. City of Santander 207
Sonia SOTERO MUÑIZ and José Antonio TEIXEIRA VITIENES

10.1. Introduction  207

10.2. ClouT project 210

10.2.1. Participatory sensing for city management 211

10.2.2. Traffic mobility management 215

10.2.3. Conclusions 219

10.3. Bibliography 220

Chapter 11. Fujisawa, Towards a Sustainable Smart City 221
Takuro YONEZAWA

11.1. Introduction 221

11.1.1. Sensorized garbage trucks 222

11.1.2. Enoshima Info Surfboard  223

11.1.3. Smile Coupon  224

11.2. Architecture and application domains 225

11.2.1. Architecture with ClouT components 225

11.2.2. Components for implementation  226

11.2.3. Interaction among components 227

11.2.4. Development scenario  228

11.2.5. Design and implementation 229

11.3. Results 236

11.4. Conclusion  237

11.5. Bibliography 237

List of Authors 239

Index 241

See More

Related Titles

More in this series

Back to Top