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Who Do You Think You Are?: Three Crucial Conversations for Coaching Teens to College and Career Success

ISBN: 978-1-119-38470-0
208 pages
November 2017
Who Do You Think You Are?: Three Crucial Conversations for Coaching Teens to College and Career Success (1119384702) cover image

Description

Give your kids their greatest chance at success

Who Do You Think You Are? helps parents, school counselors, and administrators get teens thinking about—and interested in—their future careers. Success in college and beyond relies on thorough prior preparation; by identifying interests and passions early on, young people are better able to plan for the career they want by mapping out the academic path to support it. This book shows you how to guide teens along on this journey, and how to stick with them until they reach the goals they've set. From helping them discover just what it is they're interested in, to finding the institution that will help them flourish and setting out a clear "plan of attack," this book provides invaluable insight from an expert in student success. 

No one expects every student to have a definitive life plan by high school graduation, but having some idea of direction is critical. Nearly 3.3 million students will graduate high school this year, and most will head straight to college—but just 20 percent of those who pursue an associate’s degree complete within four years, and only 60 percent of those who pursue a bachelor's degree complete within six years. Even those who earn a degree may struggle to move from school to work. Those who do succeed have done so because they've planned their work and worked their plans. This book shows you how to help your child to be one of the success stories. 

  • Map out an academic plan to support each kid’s field of interest
  • Identify the best-fit institution to get them where they want to be
  • Balance support and independence throughout your teen’s journey
  • Help your child be prepared for college so they can succeed far beyond

 

Adults know that success in life comes from plenty of hard work and thorough preparation—but for kids in middle and high school, that lesson is just now beginning to hit home. Who Do You Think You Are? helps you guide them through the transition successfully, so they can come out the other side exactly where they want to be.

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Table of Contents

About the Authors ix

Acknowledgments xi

PART I Who Are You?

Chapter 1 How Do You Get Started? 3

Chapter 2 What Are Your Interests and Strengths? 13

Chapter 3 What Does Work Mean to You? 25

PART II Where Are You Heading?

Chapter 4 Are You Ready for a Career in Science, Technology, Engineering, or Math? 37

Chapter 5 Can You Have a Good Career with a Degree in the Liberal Arts? 49

Chapter 6 Can You Have a Career Helping Others without Sacrificing Your Own Needs? 61

Chapter 7 Do You Want to Work in Business or Be in Business? 73

Chapter 8 Can You Make a Living as an Artist or Musician? 85

Chapter 9 Should You Consider a Career in Law or Criminal Justice? 97

PART III How Will You Get to Where You Want to Go?

Chapter 10 How Can You Try On Your Career Interests? 113

Chapter 11 Is College Right for You? 127

Chapter 12 Can You Afford College? 141

Chapter 13 Does It Matter Where You Go to College? 153

Chapter 14 Is Community College a Better Place to Start? 167

Chapter 15 Closing Thoughts 179

Additional Resources 181

Notes 185

Index 189

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Author Information

STEPHEN M. SMITH is CEO of Intellispark, an education technology company. He is vice chair of the board of College Possible, a member of the board of the National College Access Network, and a cofounder of Naviance. He previously served as president and chief product officer at Hobsons, where he focused on helping students achieve college and career readiness and success.

SHAUN FANNING is chief product officer at Intellispark and a cofounder of Naviance. He previously served as vice president of research and development at Hobsons, where he led new product initiatives focused on improving student success. Earlier in his career, he held a variety of roles in business analysis, finance, technology, marketing, and product management at AT&T and The Thomson Corporation (now Thomson Reuters).

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