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A Companion to Digital Humanities

Susan Schreibman (Editor), Ray Siemens (Editor), John Unsworth (Editor)
ISBN: 978-1-4051-0321-3
640 pages
December 2004, Wiley-Blackwell
A Companion to Digital Humanities (1405103213) cover image

Description

This Companion offers a thorough, concise overview of the emerging field of humanities computing.

  • Contains 37 original articles written by leaders in the field.
  • Addresses the central concerns shared by those interested in the subject.
  • Major sections focus on the experience of particular disciplines in applying computational methods to research problems; the basic principles of humanities computing; specific applications and methods; and production, dissemination and archiving.
  • Accompanied by a website featuring supplementary materials, standard readings in the field and essays to be included in future editions of the Companion.
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Table of Contents

Notes on Contributors viii

Foreword: Perspectives on the Digital Humanities xvi
Roberto A. Busa

The Digital Humanities and Humanities Computing: An Introduction xxiii
Susan Schreibman, Ray Siemens, and John Unsworth

PART I History

1 The History of Humanities Computing 3
Susan Hockey

2 Computing for Archaeologists 20
Harrison Eiteljorg, II

3 Art History 31
Michael Greenhalgh

4 Classics and the Computer: An End of the History 46
Greg Crane

5 Computing and the Historical Imagination 56
William G. Thomas, III

6 Lexicography 69
Russon Wooldridge

7 Linguistics Meets Exact Sciences 79
Jan Hajicí

8 Literary Studies 88
Thomas Rommel

9 Music 97
Ichiro Fujinaga and Susan Forscher Weiss

10 Multimedia 108
Geoffrey Rockwell and Andrew Mactavish

11 Performing Arts 121
David Z. Saltz

12 ‘‘Revolution? What Revolution?’’ Successes and Limits of Computing Technologies in Philosophy and Religion 132
Charles Ess

PART II Principles

13 How the Computer Works 145
Andrea Laue

14 Classification and its Structures 161
C. M. Sperberg-McQueen

15 Databases 177
Stephen Ramsay

16 Marking Texts of Many Dimensions 198
Jerome McGann

17 Text Encoding 218
Allen H. Renear

18 Electronic Texts: Audiences and Purposes 240
Perry Willett

19 Modeling: A Study in Words and Meanings 254
Willard McCarty

PART III Applications

20 Stylistic Analysis and Authorship Studies 273
Hugh Craig

21 Preparation and Analysis of Linguistic Corpora 289
Nancy Ide

22 Electronic Scholarly Editing 306
Martha Nell Smith

23 Textual Analysis 323
John Burrows

24 Thematic Research Collections 348
Carole L. Palmer

25 Print Scholarship and Digital Resources 366
Claire Warwick

26 Digital Media and the Analysis of Film 383
Robert Kolker

27 Cognitive Stylistics and the Literary Imagination 397
Ian Lancashire

28 Multivariant Narratives 415
Marie-Laure Ryan

29 Speculative Computing: Aesthetic Provocations in Humanities Computing 431
Johanna Drucker (and Bethany Nowviskie)

30 Robotic Poetics 448
William Winder

PART IV Production, Dissemination, Archiving

31 Designing Sustainable Projects and Publications 471
Daniel V. Pitti

32 Conversion of Primary Sources 488
Marilyn Deegan and Simon Tanner

33 Text Tools 505
John Bradley

34 ‘‘So the Colors Cover the Wires’’: Interface, Aesthetics, and Usability 523
Matthew G. Kirschenbaum

35 Intermediation and its Malcontents: Validating Professionalism in the Age of Raw Dissemination 543
Michael Jensen

36 The Past, Present, and Future of Digital Libraries 557
Howard Besser

37 Preservation 576
Abby Smith

Index 592

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Author Information

Susan Schreibman is Assistant Director of Maryland Institute for Technology in the Humanities at the University of Maryland, a faculty member of the University of Maryland Libraries, and Affiliate Faculty in the Department of English. Her recent publications include Computer-Mediated Discourse: Reception Theory and Versioning and ongoing work on the Thomas MacGreevy Archive.

Ray Siemens is Canada Research Chair in Humanities Computing and Associate Professor of English at the University of Victoria. Formerly he was Professor of English at Malaspina University-College and Visiting Senior Research Fellow at the Centre for Computing in the Humanities at King's College London. Founding editor of the electronic scholarly journal Early Modern Literary Studies, he is also editor of several Renaissance texts and coeditor of several collections on humanities computing topics.

John Unsworth is Dean of the Graduate School of Library and Information Science at the University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign. He is founding coeditor of Postmodern Culture, an e-journal, and founding Director of the University of Virginia’s Institute for Advanced Technology in the Humanities.

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The Wiley Advantage


  • A complete, yet concise overview of the emerging discipline of humanities computing
  • Contains 37 original articles written by leaders in the field
  • Addresses the central concerns shared by those interested in the subject
  • Major sections focus on the experience of particular disciplines in applying computational problems to research problems; the basic principles of humanities computing; specific applications and methods; and production, dissemination and archiving
See More

Reviews

"A Companion to Digital Humanities stands on its own as a post-Revolution snapshot. It shows what happened immediately after computing became both practical, necessary and omnipresent in the Humanities.... Let there be another volume like this to document the next five years." (Classical Journal Online, May 2009)

“Offers the best general introduction to this amorphous field.” (Literary Research Guide)

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