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A Companion to the Early Middle Ages: Britain and Ireland c.500-1100

ISBN: 978-1-4051-0628-3
576 pages
April 2009, Wiley-Blackwell
A Companion to the Early Middle Ages: Britain and Ireland c.500-1100 (140510628X) cover image
Drawing on 28 original essays, A Companion to the Early Middle Ages takes an inclusive approach to the history of Britain and Ireland from c.500 to c.1100 to overcome artificial distinctions of modern national boundaries.
  •  A collaborative history from leading scholars, covering the key debates and issues
  • Surveys the building blocks of political society, and considers whether there were fundamental differences across Britain and Ireland
  • Considers potential factors for change, including the economy, Christianisation, and the Vikings
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List of Maps

Notes on Contributors

List of Abbreviations

Maps

Part I: Introductory Matter:

1. Introduction: Pauline Stafford (University of Liverpool)

2. Historiography: Pauline Stafford (University of Liverpool)

3. Sources: Pauline Stafford (University of Liverpool)

Part II: Britain and Ireland, c.500–c.750:

4. Britain and Ireland, c.500: Barbara Yorke (University of Winchester)

5. Economy: Howard B. Clarke (formerly University College Dublin)

6. Kings and Kingship: Barbara Yorke (University of Winchester)

7. Communities and Kinship: David E. Thornton (Bilkent University, Turkey)

8. Social Structure: Thomas M. Charles-Edwards (University of Oxford)

9. Britain, Ireland, and Europe, c.500–c.750: Paul Fouracre (University of Manchester)

10. Conversions to Christianity: Huw Pryce (Bangor University)

11. Church Organization and Pastoral Care: Thomas Pickles (University of Oxford)

12. Latin Learning and Christian Art: Martin J. Ryan (University of Manchester)

Part III: Britain and Ireland in the Long Ninth Century, c.750–c.900:

13. Viking Raids and Conquest: Dawn Hadley (University of Sheffield)

14. Scandinavian Settlement: Dawn Hadley (University of Sheffield)

15. Britain, Ireland, and Europe, c.750–c.900: Janet L. Nelson (King’s College, London)

Part IV: Britain and Ireland, c.900–c.1100:

16. Scotland: Alex Woolf (University of St. Andrews)

17. Ireland, c.900–c.1000: Edel Bhreathnach (University College Dublin)

18. Ireland, c.1000–c.1100: Seán Duffy (Trinity College Dublin)

19. Northumbria: William M. Aird (Cardiff University)

20. Southumbria: Charles Insley (Canterbury Christ Church University)

21. Wales and West Britain: John Reuben Davies (University of Glasgow)

22. Britain, Ireland, and Europe, c.900–c.1100: Simon MacLean (University of St. Andrews)

23. The Institutional Church: Catherine Cubitt (University of York)

24. Pastoral Care and Religious Belief: Catherine Cubitt (University of York)

25. Nobility: Julia Crick (University of Exeter)

26. Settlement and Social Differentiation: Sally Crawford (University of Birmingham)

27. Localities: David E. Thornton (Bilkent University, Turkey)

28. Queens and Queenship: Pauline Stafford (University of Liverpool)

Bibliography

Index

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Pauline Stafford is Professor Emerita at Liverpool University, previously Professor of Medieval History. She is a specialist in the history of Anglo-Saxon England and of women and gender in England and Europe from the eighth to twelfth centuries. Her previous publications include Queens, Concubines and Dowagers, the King’s Wife in the Early Middle Ages (1983, 1998), Unification and Conquest, a Political and Social History of England in the Tenth and Eleventh Centuries (1989), Queen Emma and Queen Edith (1997, 2001), Law, Laity and Solidarities (2001), Gender, Family and the Legitimation of Power: England from the Ninth to Early Twelfth Century (2006), and the jointly edited Gendering the Middle Ages (2000).
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  • A collaborative history of Britain and Ireland from c.500 to c.1100 AD, covering the key debates and issues
  • Comprises 27 original essays by leading scholars
  • Takes an inclusive approach to the history of Britain and Ireland to overcome artificial distinctions of modern national boundaries
  • Surveys the building blocks of political society, and considers whether there were fundamental differences across Britain and Ireland
  • Considers potential factors for change, including the economy, Christianisation, and the Vikings
See More
"Yet another volume in this thoughtful, thought provoking and carefully written series has now appeared, this time focusing primarily on pre Norman Britain and Ireland from the end of the Roman period." (Reference Reviews, February 2010)

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