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Surveys in Economic Growth: Theory and Empirics

Donald A. R. George (Editor), Les Oxley (Editor), Kenneth Carlaw (Editor)
ISBN: 978-1-4051-0881-2
304 pages
February 2004, Wiley-Blackwell
Surveys in Economic Growth: Theory and Empirics (1405108819) cover image
This volume discusses recent work on economic growth from both theoretical and empirical points of view.

  • An in-depth discussion of recent work on economic growth.

  • Keeps readers abreast of the central ideas in the field.

  • Presents both theoretical and empirical points of view.

  • Accessible to the technically competent non-specialist economist.

  • Covers topics such as technical progress, human capital, international trade, convergence, unemployment, and fiscal policy.
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1. Economic Growth in Transition: Donald A. R. George (University of Edinburgh), Les Oxley (University of Canterbury, New Zealand) and Ken Carlaw (University of Canterbury, New Zealand).

2. Specifying Human Capital: Ludger Wõßmann (Ifo Institute for Economic Research, Munich).

3. Cost and Income Based Measures of Human Capital: Trinh Le, John Gibson (University of Waikato, New Zealand) and Les Oxley (University of Canterbury, New Zealand).

4. What Have We Learnt From the Convergence Debate?: Nazrul Islam (Emory University).

5. How Large is International Trade’s Effect on Economic Growth?: Joshua J. Lewer (West Texas, A & M University) and Hendrik Van den Berg (University of Nebraska).

6. Fiscal Policy and Economic Growth: Martin Zagler (Vienna University of Economics & Business Administration and Free University of Bozen, Bolzano) and Georg Durnecker (Vienna University of Economics & Business Administration).

7. Growth and Unemployment: Towards a Theoretical Integration: Fabio Aricó (University of Pavia).

8. Productivity, Technology and Economic Growth: What is the Relationship?: Kenneth I Carlaw (University of Canterbury, New Zealand) and Richard G. Lipsey (Simon Fraser University, Canada).

9. The Long-Run Implications of Growth Theories: Jonathan Temple (University of Bristol).

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Donald A.R. George is Senior Lecturer in Economics at the University of Edinburgh. He has been a Jean Monnet Fellow at the European University Institute in Florence, Italy, Visiting Associate Professor of Economics at Queen’s University, Canada, and Visiting Professor of Economics at the University of Canterbury, New Zealand. He has published extensively on the economics of self-management, economic dynamics, and the economics of product reliability, and is joint founding editor of the Journal of Economic Surveys.


Les Oxley is Professor of Economics at the University of Canterbury, New Zealand, and Adjunct Professor at the University of Western Australia. He was formerly Senior Lecturer at the University of Edinburgh, and has held visiting positions at the Australian National University, Monash University and the University of Western Australia. He has published widely in applied econometrics and is joint founding editor of the Journal of Economic Surveys.


Kenneth I. Carlaw is Senior Lecturer at the University of Canterbury, New Zealand. He received his doctorate from Simon Fraser University, Canada, and has been a Visiting Research Fellow with the New Zealand Treasury. He has published on the economics of technological change and economic growth, technology policy, and the theory of general purpose technologies.

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  • An in-depth discussion of recent work on economic growth.
  • Keeps readers abreast of the central ideas in the field.
  • Presents both theoretical and empirical points of view.
  • Accessible to the technically competent non-specialist economist.
  • Covers topics such as technical progress, human capital, international trade, convergence, unemployment, and fiscal policy.
See More

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