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An Introduction to Japanese Linguistics, 2nd Edition

ISBN: 978-1-4051-1066-2
520 pages
September 2006, Wiley-Blackwell
An Introduction to Japanese Linguistics, 2nd Edition (140511066X) cover image
The new edition of An Introduction to Japanese Linguistics gives an updated, comprehensive account of Japanese linguistics, covering phonetics, phonology, morphology, syntax, semantics, language change, dialect variation, and gender differences.
  • Changes in the new edition include a new chapter on language acquisition, which includes experimental research and its implications for phonological, syntactic, and semantic issues
  • Introduces linguistic notions and terminology and discusses theoretical analyses of linguistic phenomena in the Japanese language
  • Focuses primarily on phonology and syntax, and adopts a generative grammar framework
  • Includes exercises exploring descriptive and theoretical issues and reading lists which introduce students to the research literature
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List of Figures, Tables, and Maps.

Preface to the Second Edition.

Acknowledgments.

1. Introduction.

Suggested Readings.

2. Phonetics.

1. Phonetic Inventory.

1.1. Place/Manner of Articulation and Voicing.

1.2. Phonetic Inventory of English – Consonants.

1.3. Phonetic Inventory of Japanese – Consonants.

1.4. Phonetic Inventory of English – Vowels.

1.5. Phonetic Inventory of Japanese – Vowels.

Notes.

Suggested Readings.

Exercises.

3. Phonology.

1. Phonological Rules in Japanese.

1.1. Devoicing of High Vowels.

1.2. Nasal Assimilation.

1.3. Alveolar Alternations.

1.4. Alternations.

1.5. Digression on the Phoneme Status of.

1.6. Verbal Conjugation Rules.

1.7. Rule Ordering.

2. Sequential Voicing – "Rendaku".

3. Mora vs. Syllable.

3.1. Speech Errors.

3.2. Language Games: "Babibu" Language.

4. Accentuation in Japanese.

4.1. Stress vs. Pitch.

4.2. Accentuation in Japanese.

4.3. Mora vs. Syllable.

4.4. Accentuation of Long Nominal Compounds.

4.5. Accentuation of Short Nominal Compounds.

4.6. Accentual Variation Among Endings.

5. Mimetics.

6. Loan Words.

7. Casual Speech and Fast Speech.

8. Length Requirements.

Notes.

Suggested Readings.

Exercises.

4. Morphology.

1. Parts of Speech Categories.

1.1. Nouns.

1.2. Verbs.

1.3. Adjectives.

1.4. Adverbs.

1.5. Postpositions.

1.6. Case Particles.

1.7. Adjectival Nouns.

1.8. Verbal Nouns.

2. Morpheme Types.

3. Word Formation.

3.1. Affixation.

3.2. Compounding.

3.3. Reduplication.

3.4. Clipping.

3.5. Borrowing.

4. Head.

5. Issues in Japanese Morphology (1): Transitive and Intransitive Verb Pairs.

6. Issues in Japanese Morphology (2): Nominalization.

7. Issues in Japanese Morphology (3): Compounding.

7.1. Background.

7.2. N–V Compounds.

7.3. V–V Compounds.

Notes.

Suggested Readings.

Exercises.

5. Syntax.

1.Syntactic Structures.

1.1. Syntactic Constituency.

1.2. Phrase Structures.

1.3. Phrase Structure Rules.

1.4. The Notion of Head.

1.5. Subcategorization.

1.6. Structural Relations.

2. Transformational Rules.

2.1. Yes–No Question.

2.2. WH-Movement.

3. Word Order and Scrambling.

3.1. Scrambling Phenomenon.

3.2. Configurationality.

3.3. Evidence for the Movement Analysis.

3.4. Some Restrictions on Scrambling.

4. Null Anaphora.

4.1. Syntactic Representation of Null Anaphora.

4.2. Interpretation of Null Anaphora.

5. Reflexives.

5.1. Zibun.

5.2. Zibun-Zisin.

6.The Notion of Subject.

6.1. Reflexivization.

6.2. Subject Honorification.

7. Passives.

7.1. Direct Passives.

7.2. Indirect Passives (Adversative Passives).

7.3. Ni Yotte-Passives.

8. Causatives.

8.1. O-Causatives and Ni-Causatives.

8.2. The Double-O Constraint.

8.3. The Structure of Causatives.

8.4. Causative Passives.

8.5. Adversative Causatives.

8.6. Lexical Causatives.

9. Relative Clauses (Sentence Modifiers).

9.1. The Ga/No Conversion.

9.2. Relative Clauses without Gaps.

9.3. Internally Headed Relative Clauses.

10. Unaccusativity.

11. The Light Verb Construction.

12. Further Issues on Phrase Structure.

12.1. X′-Theory.

12.2. Application to Japanese.

Notes.

Suggested Readings.

Exercises.

6. Semantics.

1. Word Meaning and Sentence Meaning.

1.1. Word/Phrase Meaning and Types of Relationships.

1.2. Sentence Meaning.

1.3. Metaphors and Idioms.

1.4. Deixis.

1.5. Mimetics.

2. Tense and Aspect.

2.1. Tense.

2.2. Aspect.

3. Verb Semantics.

3.1. Linking Regularity and Unaccusativity.

3.2. Semantic Classes of Verbs and their Syntactic Patterns.

3.3. Lexicalization.

4. Pragmatics.

4.1. Speaker’s Meaning.

4.2. The Nature of Information.

4.3. Relevance of Contextual Information.

Notes.

Suggested Readings.

Exercises.

7. Language Variation.

1.Dialectal Variation.

2. Styles and Levels of Speech.

3. Gender Differences.

Notes.

Suggested Readings.

Exercises.

8. Language Acquisition.

1. Regularity in Language Acquisition.

1.1. Phonological Unit – Mora.

1.2. Lexicalization Pattern and Mimetics.

1.3. Tense/Aspect Marking.

2. Generalizations in Children’s Errors.

2.1. Inflectional Morphology.

2.1. Case Particles.

2.3. Prenominal Modification.

3. Theoretical Approaches to Verb Acquisition.

4. Pragmatic Acquisition.

Suggested Readings.

Exercises.

Bibliography.

Index.

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Natsuko Tsujimura is Professor of Japanese Linguistics at Indiana University. Her publications include The Handbook of Japanese Linguistics (Blackwell, 1999), and she has published extensively on various aspects of lexical semantics.
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  • Second edition of the comprehensive textbook on Japanese linguistics, covering phonetics, phonology, morphology, syntax, semantics, language change, dialect variation, and gender differences.

  • Changes in the new edition include a new chapter on language acquisition, which includes experimental research and its implications for phonological, syntactic, and semantic issues.

  • Introduces linguistic notions and terminology and discusses theoretical analyses of linguistic phenomena in the Japanese language.

  • Focuses primarily on phonology and syntax, and adopts a generative grammar framework.

  • Includes exercises exploring descriptive and theoretical issues and reading lists which introduce students to the research literature.
See More
"While maintaining the well-balanced coverage of Japanese linguistics of the earlier edition, Tsujimura manages to explore a variety of new issues in the experimental and applied areas. The well-chosen additional problem sets guide students towards important topics for future research."
Junko Ito, University of California, Santa Cruz

"This revised edition provides in-depth coverage of all areas of Japanese grammar and will be a valuable pedagogical and reference work for anyone interested in Japanese linguistics."
Peter Sells, Stanford University

"In this new edition, Tsujimura gives in-depth discussions of all major areas in Japanese linguistics, including recent discoveries and a whole new chapter on language acquisition."
Haruo Kubozono, Kobe University, Japan

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