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Envisioning the Past: Archaeology an the Image

Sam Smiles (Editor), Stephanie Moser (Editor)
ISBN: 978-1-4051-1151-5
264 pages
January 2005, Wiley-Blackwell
Envisioning the Past: Archaeology an the Image (1405111518) cover image
Envisioning the Past: Archaeology and the Image is a groundbreaking collection of original essays that brings together archaeologists, art historians and anthropologists to provide new perspectives on the construction of knowledge concerning the antiquity of man.



  • Covers a wide variety of time periods and topics, from the Renaissance and the 18th century to the engravings, photography, and virtual realities of today



  • Questions what we can learn from considering the use of images in the past and present that might guide our responsible use of them in the future



  • Available within the prestigious New Interventions in Art History series, published in connection with the Association of Art Historians.
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Series Editor's Preface.

List of Illustrations.

Notes on Contributors.

Introduction: The Image in Question: Stephanie Moser (University of Southampton) and Sam Smiles (University of Plymouth).

1 Romancing the Human: The Ideology of Envisioned Human Origins: Paul Privateer (Arizona State University).

2 “We Grew Up and Moved On”: Visitors to British Museums Consider Their “Cradle of Mankind”: Monique Scott (Yale University).

3 The American Time Machine: Indians and the Visualization of Ancient Europe: Stephanie Pratt (University of Plymouth).

4 “To Make the Dry Bones Live”: Amédée Forestier’s Glastonbury Lake Village: James E. Phillips (University of Southampton).

5 Unlearning the Images of Archaeology: Dana Arnold (University of Southampton).

6 Illustrating Ancient Rome, or the Ichnographia as Uchronia and other time warps in Piranesi’s Il Campo Marzio: Susan M. Dixon (University of Tulsa).

7 Thomas Guest and Paul Nash in Wiltshire: two episodes in the artistic approach to British antiquity: Sam Smiles (University of Plymouth).

8 A Different Way of Seeing? Toward a Visual Analysis of Archaeological Folklore: Darren Glazier (University of Southampton).

9 Photography and Archaeology: The Image as Object: Fred Bohrer (Hood College).

10 Wearing Juninho’s Shirt: Record and Negotiation in Excavation Photographs: Jonathan Bateman (University of Sheffield).

11 Video Killed Interpretative VR: Computer Visualisations on the TV Screen: Graeme P. Earl (University of Southampton).

12 The Real, the Virtually Real and the Hyperreal: The Role of VR in Archaeology: Mark Gillings (University of Leicester).

Index

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Sam Smiles is Professor of Art History at the University of Plymouth. He is the author of The Image of Antiquity: Ancient Britain and the Romantic Imagination (1994) and Eye Witness: Artists and Visual Documentation in Britain, 1770–1830 (2000).


Stephanie Moser is Senior Lecturer in Archaeology at the University of Southampton. She is the author of Ancestral Images: The Iconography of Human Origins (1998) and Exhibiting Egypt (2005).

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  • Provides new perspectives on the construction of knowledge concerning the antiquity of man



  • Covers a wide variety of time periods and topics, from the Renaissance and the 18th century to the engravings, photography, and virtual realities of today



  • Features original studies by an expert group of archaeologists, art historians, and anthropologists



  • Questions what we can learn from considering the use of images in the past and present that might guide our responsible use of them in the future



  • Available within the prestigious New Interventions in Art History series, published in connection with the Association of Art Historians.
See More
"I recommend this book to anyone interested in the relationship between archaeology and 'the image', and particularly point to the contributions by Glazier, Scott, Phillips and Arnold." Cultural Studies

Envisioning the Past dissects a range of visual reconstructions of antiquity to expose conventions so widely accepted that their distorting effect has become all but invisible. The reader undergoes a process of re-sensitization that is eye-opening in the most literal sense.” Arthur MacGregor, Ashmolean Museum, University of Oxford

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