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Rewritten Theology: Aquinas After His Readers

ISBN: 978-1-4051-1221-5
224 pages
December 2005, Wiley-Blackwell
Rewritten Theology: Aquinas After His Readers (1405112212) cover image
Responding to the recent upsurge of interest in Thomas Aquinas, this book goes straight to the heart of the contemporary debates about Thomism.
  • Focuses on the concept of authority, both in terms of Aquinas’s own attitude to authority, and how the Church authorities have used Aquinas’s texts.
  • Engages with appropriations of Aquinas’s work by a range of theologians, from liberal Catholics to the creators of radical orthodoxy.
  • Argues for future readings of Aquinas which are substantially different from those which have gone before.
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    Preface.

    Abbreviations and Editions.

    1 St. Thomas and the Police.

    2 The Competition of Authoritative Languages.

    3 Imaginary Thomistic Sciences.

    4 Thomas’s Alleged Aristotelianism or Aristotle Among the Authorities.

    5 The Protreptic of Against the Gentiles.

    6 The Summa of Theology as Moral Formation.

    7 What the Summa of Theology Teaches.

    8 Philosophy in a Summa of Theology.

    9 Writing Secrets in a Summa of Theology.

    Conclusion: Writing Theology after Thomas -- and His Readers.

    Index.

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    Mark D. Jordan is the Asa Griggs Candler Professor in the Department of Religion at Emory University. He is the author of Ordering Wisdom: The Hierarchy of Philosophical Discourse in Aquinas (1986), The Invention of Sodomy in Christian Theology (1997), The Silence of Sodom: Homosexuality in Modern Catholicism (2000) and The Ethics of Sex (Blackwell, 2001).
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    • A creative response to the recent upsurge of interest in Aquinas.

    • Focuses on the concept of authority, both in terms of Aquinas’s own attitude to authority, and how the Church authorities have used Aquinas’s texts.

    • Engages with appropriations of Aquinas’s work by a range of theologians, from liberal Catholics to the creators of radical orthodoxy.

    • Argues for future readings of Aquinas which are substantially different from those which have gone before.
    See More
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