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A Companion to the British and Irish Novel 1945 - 2000

ISBN: 978-1-4051-1375-5
604 pages
December 2004, Wiley-Blackwell
A Companion to the British and Irish Novel 1945 - 2000 (1405113758) cover image
A Companion to the British and Irish Novel 1945-2000 serves as an extended introduction and reference guide to the British and Irish novel between the close of World War II and the turn of the millennium.

  • Covers a wide range of authors from Samuel Beckett to Salman Rushdie
  • Provides readings of key novels, including Graham Greene’s ‘Heart of the Matter’, Jean Rhys’s ‘Wide Sargasso Sea’ and Kazuo Ishiguro’s ‘The Remains of the Day
  • Considers particular subgenres, such as the feminist novel and the postcolonial novel
  • Discusses overarching cultural, political and literary trends, such as screen adaptations and the literary prize phenomenon
  • Gives readers a sense of the richness and diversity of the novel during this period and of the vitality with which it continues to be discussed
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Notes on Contributors.

Preface.

Acknowledgements.

PART I Contexts for the British and Irish Novel, 1945-2000:

1. The Literary Response to the Second World War: Damon Marcel Decoste (University of Regina).

2. The ‘Angry’ Decade and After: Dale Salwak (Citrus College).

3. English Dystopian Satire in Context: M. Keith Booker (University of Arkansas in Fayetteville).

4. The Feminist Novel in the Wake of Virginia Woolf : Roberta Rubenstein (American University in Washington).

5. Postmodern Fiction and the Rise of Critical Theory: Patricia Waugh (University of Durham).

6. The Novel and the End of Empire: Reed Way Dasenbrock (University of New Mexico).

7. Postcolonial Novels and Theories: Feroza Jussawalla (University of New Mexico).

8. Fictions of Belonging: National Identity, Literary Culture, and the Novel in Ireland and Scotland: Gerard Carruthers (University of Glasgow).

9. Black-British Interventions: John Skinner (University of Turku, Finland).

10. The Recuperation of History in British and Irish Fiction: Margaret Scanlan (Indiana University South Bend).

11. The Literary Prize Phenomenon in Context: James F. English (University of Pennsylvania).

12. Novelistic Production and the Publishing Industry in Britain and Ireland: Claire Squires (Oxford Brookes University).

13. The Novel and the Rise of Film and Video: Adaptation and British Cinema: Brian McFarlane (Monash University).

14. The English Heritage Industry and Other Trends in the Novel at the Millennium: Peter Childs (University of Gloucestershire).

PART II Reading Individual Texts and Authors:

15. Samuel Beckett’s Watt: S. E. Gontarski (Florida State University) and Chris Ackerley (University of Otago).

16. George Orwell’s Animal Farm and Nineteen Eighty-Four: Erika Gottlieb (Ryerson Polytechnic University).

17. Evelyn Waugh’s Brideshead Revisited and Other Late Novels: Bernard Schweizer (Long Island University).

18. Modernism’s Swansong: Malcolm Lowry’s Under the Volcano: Patrick A. McCarthy (University of Miami).

19. Graham Greene’s Heart of the Matter and Other Late Novels: Cedric Watts (University of Sussex).

20. William Golding’s Lord of the Flies and Other Early Novels: Kevin McCarron (University of Surrey).

21. Amis, Father and Son: Merritt Moseley (University of North Carolina).

22. Iris Murdoch: Margaret Moan Rowe (Purdue University).

23. Academic Satire: the Campus Novel in Context: Kenneth Womack (Penn State University).

24. Lawrence Durrell’s Alexandria Quartet: Julius Rowan Raper (University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill).

25. The Oxford Fantasists: C. S. Lewis and J. R. R. Tolkien: Peter J. Schakel (Hope College).

26. Muriel Spark’s The Prime of Miss Jean Brodie: Bryan Cheyette (Southampton University).

27. Doris Lessing’s The Golden Notebook: Judith Kegan Gardiner (University of Illinois at Chicago).

28. Jean Rhys’s Wide Sargasso Sea: John J. Su (Marquette University).

29. John Fowles’s The French Lieutenant’s Woman: James Acheson (University of Canterbury, New Zealand).

30. Angela Carter: Nicola Pitchford (Fordham University).

31. Margaret Drabble: Margaret Moan Rowe (Purdue University).

32. V. S. Naipaul: Timothy Weiss (Chinese University of Hong Kong).

33. Salman Rushdie: Nico Israel (City University of New York).

34. The Irish Novel after Joyce: Donna Potts (Kansas State University).

35. Anita Brookner: Cheryl Alexander Malcolm (University of Gdañsk, Poland).

36. Julian Barnes’s Flaubert’s Parrot: Merritt Moseley (University of North Carolina).

37. Kazuo Ishiguro’s The Remains of the Day: Cynthia F. Wong (University of Colorado).

38. Ian McEwan: Rebecca L. Walkowitz (University of Wisconsin).

39. Graham Swift: Donald P. Kaczvinsky (Louisiana Tech University).

40. The Scottish New Wave: David Goldie (University of Strathclyde).

41. A. S. Byatt’s Possession: A Romance: Lynn Wells (University of Regina).

42. Pat Barker’s Regeneration Trilogy: Anne Whitehead (University of Newcastle-upon-Tyne).

Index.

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Brian W. Shaffer is Professor of English and Associate Dean of Academic Affairs for Faculty Development at Rhodes College in Memphis, Tennessee. He is the author of The Blinding Torch: Modern British Fiction and the Discourse of Civilization (1993) and Understanding Kazuo Ishiguro (1998). He is also the co-editor with Hunt Hawkins of Approaches to Teaching Conrad’s “Heart of Darkness” and “The Secret Sharer” (2002).
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  • A comprehensive guide to the British and Irish novel between the close of World War II and the turn of the millennium
  • Covers a wide range of authors from Samuel Beckett to Salman Rushdie
  • Provides readings of key novels, including Graham Greene’s ‘Heart of the Matter’, Jean Rhys’s ‘Wide Sargasso Sea’ and Kazuo Ishiguro’s ‘The Remains of the Day
  • Considers particular subgenres, such as the feminist novel and the postcolonial novel
  • Discusses overarching cultural, political and literary trends, such as screen adaptations and the literary prize phenomenon
  • Gives readers a sense of the richness and diversity of the novel during this period and of the vitality with which it continues to be discussed
See More
"Esseintally two books in one, this is both a useful reference guide and a detailed introduction tot he postwar British novel." Recommended."
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