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The Blackwell Guide to Plato's Republic

ISBN: 978-1-4051-1564-3
304 pages
January 2006, ©2006, Wiley-Blackwell
The Blackwell Guide to Plato
The Blackwell Guide to Plato’s Republic consists of thirteen new essays written by both established scholars and younger researchers with the specific aim of helping readers to understand Plato’s masterwork.

  • This guide to Plato’s Republic is designed to help readers understand this foundational work of the Western canon.
  • Sheds new light on many central features and themes of the Republic.
  • Covers the literary and philosophical style of the Republic; Plato’s theories of justice and knowledge; his educational theories; and his treatment of the divine.
  • Will be of interest to readers who are new to the Republic, and those who already have some familiarity with the book.
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Notes on Contributors.

Editor’s Introduction.

1. The Literary and Philosophical Style of The Republic: Christopher Rowe (University of Durham).

2. Allegory and Myth in Plato’s Republic: Jonathan Lear (The University of Chicago).

3. Socrates’ Refutation of Thrasymachus: Rachel Barney (University of Toronto).

4. Plato’s Challenge: the Case Against Justice in Republic II: Christopher Shields (Oxford University).

5. The Gods and Piety of Plato’s Republic: Mark L. McPherran (University of Maine).

6. Plato on Learning to Love Beauty: Gabriel Richardson Lear (The University of Chicago).

7. Methods of Reasoning About Justice in Plato’s Republic: Gerasimos Santas (University of California, Irvine).

8. The Analysis of the Soul in Plato’s Republic: Hendrik Lorenz (Princeton University).

9. The Divided Soul and Desire for the Good in Plato’s Republic: Mariana Anagnostopoulos (California State University).

10. Plato and the Ship of State: David Keyt (University of Washington).

11. Knowledge, Recollection and the Forms in Republic VII: Michael T. Ferejohn (Duke University).

12. Plato’s Theory of Forms in the Republic: Terrence Penner (University of Edinburgh).

13. Plato’s Defense of Justice: Rachel G. K. Singpurwalla (Southern Illinois University).

Bibliography.

Index

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Gerasimos Santas is Professor of Philosophy at the University of California, Irvine. His previous publications include Socrates (1979), Plato and Freud: Two Theories of Love (Blackwell, 1988), and Goodness and Justice: Plato, Aristotle and the Moderns (Blackwell, 2001).
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  • This guide to Plato’s Republic is designed to help readers understand this foundational work of the Western canon.

  • Comprises thirteen new essays written by both established scholars and younger researchers.

  • Sheds new light on many central features and themes of the Republic.

  • Covers the literary and philosophical style of the Republic; Plato’s theories of justice and knowledge; his educational theories; and his treatment of the divine.

  • Will be of interest to readers who are new to the Republic, and those who already have some familiarity with the book.
See More
"A judicious mix of new voices and more familiar ones, Santas' Guide is a terrific resource for students and teachers of Plato's masterwork. It should command a wide readership and be in every library." C. D. C. Reeve, The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill


This is a splendid collection of essays. The contributors are not content with rehashing old material but demonstrate how it is still possible to engage with the Republic in new and philosophically stimulating ways. It provides a first-rate guide both to the Republic itself and to some of the most exciting developments in its interpretation. R F Stalley, University of Glasgow


"This is a valuable collection. We should be grateful to Gerasimos Santas, and to each of the contributors to this volume, for the new light they have shed on Plato's masterpiece." Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews

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