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A New History of the Peloponnesian War

Lawrence A. Tritle (Original Author)
ISBN: 978-1-4051-2250-4
320 pages
December 2009, Wiley-Blackwell
A New History of the Peloponnesian War (1405122501) cover image
This stimulating new study provides a narrative of the monumental conflict of the Peloponnesian War between Athens and Sparta, and examines the realities of the war and its effects on the average Athenian.
  • A penetrating new study of the Peloponnesian War between Athens and Sparta by an established scholar
  • Offers an original interpretation of how and why the war began
  • Weaves in the contemporary evidence of Aristophanes in order to give readers a new sense of how the war affected the individual
  • Discusses the practicalities and realities of the war
  • Examines the blossoming of culture and intellectual achievement in Athens despite the war
  • Challenges the approach of Thucydides in his account of the war
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List of illustrations.

Maps.

Abbreviations.

Chronology.

Acknowledgements.

Preface.

Prelude - a band of brothers.

1. ‘From this the Corinthians developed their bitter hatred for the Athenians’.

2. ‘Give the Greeks their freedom’.

3. ‘Our city is an education to Greece’.

4. ‘War is a violent teacher’.

5. ‘Spindles would be worth a lot’.

6. ‘Weeping for joy’.

7. ‘The strong do what they have the power to do’.

8. ‘What of us then who for our children must weep?’

9. ‘The whole of Hellas against Athens’.

10. ‘Ships gone … don’t know what to do’.

11. ‘Athens is taken’.

12. ‘Here’s to the noble Critias!’

13. Epilogue.

14. Appendix I: A Note on Sources.

15. Appendix II: Who’s Who in the Peloponnesian War.

16. Appendix III: A Peloponnesian War Glossary.

Bibliography.

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Lawrence A. Tritle is Professor of History at Loyola Marymount University, Los Angeles. He has previously taught at Loyola University, Chicago and UCLA as visiting Professor of History. He is the author or editor of eight books on Greek history, including Phocion the Good (1988) and From Melos to My Lai (2000), as well as numerous articles on various aspects of the ancient world. He has served on the editorial board of the Ancient History Bulletin (1996 – 2003) and as president of the International Plutarch Society (1997-1999).
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* A refreshing new study of the Peloponnesian War between Athens and Sparta by an established scholar.

* Offers an original interpretation of how and why the war actually came about.

* Weaves in the contemporary evidence of Aristophanes in order to give readers a sense of how the War affected the common man.

* Looks at the practicalities and realities of the war rather than taking a “war-gamer’s” approach.

* Examines the blossoming of culture and intellectual achievement in Athens despite the war.

See More
"Tritle's overall aim is to make the content and context of the Peloponnesian War more accessible to those unfamiliar with classics, and on the whole I believe he succeeds. His tone throughout is quite relaxed...but for those unfamiliar with classical Greek history and/or the Peloponnesian war Tritle's book is a good starting place." (Bryn Mawr Classical Review, December 2010)

"He has produced a major new account of the Peloponnesian War that will allow readers of Thucydides to feel what it was actually like to be at war and to understand the breakdown of legal, moral, and political principles that caused prolonged human suffering on such a colossal scale. We are in his debt.." (Michigan War Studies Review, 2 October 2010)

"Recommended. Undergraduate libraries and above". (Choice, 1 November 2010)

“An insightful, highly readable history of the first all-out war in western history. Tritle knows Greek history and he knows what war does to soldiers and civilians alike.”
Tom Palaima, University of Texas at Austin

“Not another paraphrase of Thucydides, Tritle's sensitive new history of the great war between Athens and Sparta marshals the literary and material evidence to explore the human and societal experience, showing once again that military history extends far beyond the battlefield.”
Waldemar Heckel, University of Calgary

“Swift narrative, mastery of modern scholarship, and unusual integration of classical literature. Like his great source Thucydides, the author was a soldier, and the terrible brutality of war is immanent.”
Mortimer Chambers, UCLA

“By helping us understand broadly and deeply the human and social dimension of this war, Tritle’s book brilliantly justifies its ambitious title of a ‘new history’ of an often-treated old war.”
Kurt A. Raaflaub, Brown University

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