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Publics and the City

ISBN: 978-1-4051-2732-5
264 pages
May 2007, Wiley-Blackwell
Publics and the City (1405127325) cover image
Publics and the City investigates struggles over the making of urban publics, considering how the production, management and regulation of ‘public spaces’ has emerged as a problem for both urban politics and urban theory.

  • Advances a new framework for considering the diverse spatialities of publicness in relation to the city
  • Argues that a city’s contribution to the making of publics goes beyond the provision of places for public gathering
  • Examines a series of detailed case studies
  • Looks at the relationship between urbanism, public spheres, and democracy
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List of Illustrations.

Acknowledgements.

1 The Problem with Public Space.

2 Publics and the City.

3 Making a Claim: The Regulation of Protest at Parliament House, Canberra.

4 Cruising: Governing Beat Sex in Melbourne.

5 Making a Name: Writing Graffiti in Sydney.

6 "No Fun. No Hope. Don't Belong." : Re-making "Public Space" in Neo-liberal Perth.

7 Justifying Exclusion: Keeping Men out of the Ladies’ Baths, Sydney.

8 Imagining the Public City: Concluding Reflections.

Bibliography.

Index

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Kurt Iveson is Lecturer in Urban Geography at the University of Sydney, Australia.
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  • Advances a new framework for considering the diverse spatialities of publicness in relation to the city
  • Argues that a city’s contribution to the making of publics goes beyond the provision of places for public gathering
  • Examines a series of detailed case studies
  • Looks at the relationship between urbanism, public spheres, and democracy
See More
"Rich and varied case studies make the material accessible ... .An original, engaging, and interesting contribution to debates about the uses, meanings, and urban dimensions of public address and public space." (American Journal of Sociobiology, February 2010)

"An important book ... .Compelling." (Progress in Human Geography, February 2010)

“Iveson clearly demonstrates why issues of publicness should be of concern to all geographers, and he suggests that there is too much at stake to accept existing normative assumptions about the decline of the public sphere.” (Cultural Geographies, October 2008)

"A fascinating and well argued book which convincingly explores the relationship between the public sphere – or publicness – and the city. It is an engaging and fruitful conversation between urban studies and critical social theories of the public sphere, which draws on a series of illuminating case studies."
Allan Cochrane, Open University

"Urban public spaces are arenas of political action but also of both public and private efforts to manage popular behaviour. This series of engaging Australian case studies and insightful analyses helps clarify both sets of issues. It should be of interest to everyone who cares about urban life, popular politics, and the intersection of place and identity."
Craig Calhoun, NYU

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