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The Handbook of Clinical Linguistics

Martin J. Ball (Editor), Michael R. Perkins (Editor), Nicole Muller (Editor), Sara Howard (Editor)
ISBN: 978-1-4051-3522-1
712 pages
April 2008, Wiley-Blackwell
The Handbook of Clinical Linguistics (1405135220) cover image
The Handbook of Clinical Linguistics brings together an international team of contributors to create an original, in-depth survey of the field for students and practitioners of speech-language pathology, linguistics, psychology, and education.
  • Explores the field of clinical linguistics: the application of the principles and methods of linguistics to the study of language disability in all its forms
  • Fills a gap in the existing literature, creating the first non-encyclopedic volume to explore this ever-expanding area of linguistic concern and research
  • Includes a range of pathologies, with each section exploring multilingual and cross-linguistics aspects of the field, as well as analytical methods and assessment
  • Describes how mainstream theories and descriptions of language have been influenced by clinical research
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1: Pragmatics, Discourse and Sociolinguistics:.

1. Discourse Analysis and Communication Impairment: Nicole Müller (University of Louisiana at Lafayette), Jacqueline Guendouzi (University of South Alabama) and Brent Wilson (University of Louisiana at Lafayette).

2. Conversational Implicature and Communication Impairment: Elisabeth Ahlsén (Göteborg University, Sweden).

3. Relevance Theory and Language Disorders: Eeva Leinonen and Nuala Ryder (University of Hertfordshire, UK).

4. Neuropragmatics: Brigitte Stemmer (University of Montreal).

5. Pragmatic Impairment as an Emergent Phenomenon: Michael R. Perkins (University of Sheffield, UK).

6. Conversation Analysis and Communication Disorders: Ray Wilkinson (University College London, UK).

7. Clinical Sociolinguistics: Jack S. Damico and Martin J. Ball (University of Louisiana at Lafayette).

8. Systemic Functional Linguistics and Communication Impairment: Alison Ferguson and Julie Thomson (University of Newcastle, NSW, Australia).

9. Cross-Linguistic and Multilingual Perspectives on Communicative Competence and Communication Impairment: Pragmatics, Discourse, and Sociolinguistics: Zhu Hua and Li Wei (Birkbeck College, University of London, UK).

2: Syntax and Semantics:.

10. Chomskyan Syntactic Theory and Language Disorder: Harald Clahsen (University of Essex, UK).

11. Formulaic Sequences and Language Disorder: Alison Wray (Cardiff University, UK).

12. Syntactic Processing in Developmental and Acquired Language Disorders: Theodoros Marinis (University of Reading, UK).

13. Morphology and Language Disorder: Martina Penke (University of Ghent, Belgium).

14. Normal and Pathological Semantic Processing of Words: Karima Kahlaoui and Yves Joanette (University of Montreal, Canada).

15. Neural Correlates of Normal and Pathological Language Processing: Stefan Frisch (University of Leipzig), Sonja A. Kotz (Max-Planck Institute, Leipzig), and Angela D. Friederici (Max-Planck Institute, Leipzig).

16. Bilingualism and Language Impairment: Jan de Jong (University of Amsterdam, Netherlands).

17. Cross-Linguistic Perspectives on the Syntax and Semantics of Language Disorder: Martha Crago (University of Montreal), Johanne Paradis (University of Alberta, Canada), and Lise Menn (University of Colorado, Boulder).

18. Interfaces between Cognition, Semantics, and Syntax: Shula Chiat (City University London, UK) and Maria Black (University College London, UK).

3: Phonetics and Phonology:.

19. Instrumental Analysis of Articulation in Speech Impairment: Fiona E. Gibbon (Queen Margaret University, Edinburgh, UK).

20. Instrumental Analysis of Resonance in Speech Impairment: Tara L. Whitehill (University of Hong Kong) and Alice S.-Y. Lee (University College, Cork, Ireland).

21. Instrumental Analysis of Phonation: Shaheen N. Awan (Bloomsburg University of Pennsylvania).

22. Acoustic Analysis of Speech: Ray D. Kent and Yunjung Kim (University of Wisconsin-Madison).

23. Clinical Phonetic Transcription: Barry Heselwood (University of Leeds, UK) and Sara Howard (University of Sheffield, UK).

24. Comparisons in Perception between Speech and Nonspeech Signals: Tessa Bent and David B. Pisoni (Indiana University).

25. Phonological Analysis, Phonological Processes: Adele W. Miccio and Shelley E. Scarpino (Pennsylvania State University).

26. Constraint-Based Nonlinear Phonological Theories: Application and Implications: Barbara M. H. Bernhardt and Joseph P. Stemberger (University of British Columbia, Canada).

27. Optimality Theory: A Clinical Perspective: Daniel A. Dinnsen and Judith A. Gierut (Indiana University).

28. Government Phonology and Speech Impairment: Martin J. Ball (University of Louisiana at Lafayette).

29. Articulatory Phonology and Speech Impairment: Pascal van Lieshout (University of Toronto, Canada) and Louis M. Goldstein (Yale University).

30. A Cognitive Approach to Clinical Phonology: Anna Vogel Sosa (University of Washington) and Joan L. Bybee (University of New Mexico).

31. Neurophonetics: Wolfram Ziegler (University of Munich, Germany).

32. Coarticulation and Speech Impairment: Bill Hardcastle (Queen Margaret University, Edinburgh, UK) and Kris Tjaden (University of Buffalo).

33. Vowel Development and Disorders: Carol Stoel-Gammon (University of Washington) and Karen Pollock (University of Alberta, Canada).

34. Prosodic Impairments: Bill Wells and Sandra P. Whiteside (University of Sheffield, UK).

35. Speech Intelligibility: Gary Weismer (University of Wisconsin-Madison).

36. Connected Speech: Sara Howard (University of Sheffield, UK), Bill Wells (University of Sheffield, UK), and John Local (University of York, UK).

37. Sociophonetics and Clinical Linguistics: Gerard Docherty and Ghada Khattab (University of Newcastle, UK).

38. Cross-Linguistic Phonological Acquisition: David Ingram (Arizona State University).

Author Index.

Subject Index

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Martin J. Ball is Hawthorne Endowed Professor and Head of the Department of Communicative Disorders at the University of Louisiana at Lafayette.


Mick Perkins is Professor of Clinical Linguistics in the Department of Human Communication Sciences at the University of Sheffield, England.


Nicole Muller is Hawthorne-BoRSF Endowed Professor in the Department of Communicative Disorders at the University of Louisiana at Lafayette.


Sara Howard is Senior Lecturer in Clinical Phonetics in the Department of Human Communication Sciences at the University of Sheffield.
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  • Brings together an international team of contributors to create an original and in-depth survey of this multi-faceted field
  • Explores the field of clinical linguistics: the application of the principles and methods of linguistics to the study of language disability in all its forms
  • Fills a gap in the existing literature, creating the first non-encyclopedic volume to explore this ever-expanding area of linguistic concern and research
  • Includes a range of pathologies, with each section exploring multilingual and cross-linguistics aspects of the field, as well as analytical methods and assessment
  • Describes how mainstream theories and descriptions of language have been influenced by clinical research.
See More
"This collection performs a rite of passage: clinical linguistics has come of age." David Crystal, University of Wales, Bangor


"The range of topics represented here, and the quality of the contributions, underline the advances Clinical Linguistics has made in three decades. This volume will for some time be the benchmark against which others in the field will be evaluated." Paul Fletcher, University College Cork


"This comprehensive compendium covers the breadth and depth of clinical linguistics, presenting the latest research on pragmatics, discourse, sociolinguistics, syntax, semantics, phonetics and phonology. The impressive cohort of international contributors comprises the foremost authorities in their fields. This book is a classic reference work and will be frequently cited." Sharynne McLeod, Charles Sturt University, Australia


"This Handbook offers state-of-the-art reviews and cutting-edge research reports. It is strongly recommended as a textbook for students at the master's level and higher, instructors and researchers in a variety of disciplines, including Speech-Language Pathology, Clinical Linguistics, Medicine, and Psychology." Ben Maassen, Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre

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