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Introduction to Modeling in Wildlife and Resource Conservation

ISBN: 978-1-4051-4439-1
336 pages
July 2007, Wiley-Blackwell
Introduction to Modeling in Wildlife and Resource Conservation (1405144394) cover image
This book provides students with the skills to develop their own models for application in conservation biology and wildlife management. Assuming no special mathematical expertise, the computational models used are kept simple and show how to develop models in both spreadsheet and programming language format.

  • Develops thought-provoking applications which emphasize the value of modeling as a learning tool
  • Examines basic descriptive equations, matrix representations, consumer-resources interactions, applications in simulation, scenarios, harvesting, population viability, metapopulation dynamics, disease outbreaks, vegetation stage and state dynamics, habitat suitability assessment, and model selection statistics
  • Includes a wide range of examples relating to birds, fish, plants and large African mammals
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Preface.

1. Introduction: Why Learn Modeling?.

2. A Starting Problem: Conservation of the Dodo.

3. Descriptive Models: Choosing an Equation.

4. Structured Population Models: Age, Size, or Stage.

5. Consumer-Resource Models: Population Interactions.

6. Simulation Models: Assessing Understanding.

7. Harvesting Models: Adaptive Management.

8. Population Viability Models: Risk Analysis.

9. Metapopulation Models: Spreading the Risk.

10. Modeling Infectious Diseases: Outbreak Dynamics.

11. Scenario Models: Exploring Options.

12. Vegetation Models: Biomass to Gap Dynamics.

13. State Transition Models: Habitat Patch Dynamics.

14. Habitat Suitability Models: Adaptive Behavior.

15. Reconciling Models With Data: Statistical Diagnosis.

Appendices.

References.

Index
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Norman Owen-Smith is Research Professor in African Ecology in the School of Animal, Plant, and Environmental Sciences at the University of the Witwatersrand in South Africa. He teaches ecology at undergraduate and postgraduate levels, and is well-known internationally for his research into all aspects of wildlife ecology and bioresource conservation.
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  • Provides an introduction to the skills required to develop spreadsheet and programming language format models for application in conservation biology and wildlife management

  • Assumes no special mathematical expertise

  • Develops thought-provoking applications which emphasize the value of modeling as a learning tool

  • Examines basic descriptive equations, matrix representations, consumer-resources interactions, applications in simulation, scenarios, harvesting, population viability, metapopulation dynamics, disease outbreaks, vegetation stage and state dynamics, habitat suitability assessment, and model selection statistics

  • Includes a wide range of examples relating to birds, fish, plants and large African mammals
See More
"This is consequently very much a hands-on work and ideal as a basic manual for a course on the topic. At the same time, it will be of value to conservationists who wish to understand the basis of some modeling approach they find in a paper directly pertinent to their particular interests." (Biodivers Conserv, 2011)

An easy approach to modelling." (Mammalia, April 2009)

"This is a very interesting text. ... The focus on method and theory as well as programming means that the text encourages the reader to question even basic assumptions." (Ecological and Environmental Education)

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Do you think you've discovered an error in this book? Please check the list of errata below to see if we've already addressed the error. If not, please submit the error via our Errata Form. We will attempt to verify your error; if you're right, we will post a correction below.

ChapterPageDetailsDatePrint Run
Updates and corrections
Updates posted 21.4.08

p.278:
References to ?Sheet4? should be changed to ?Sheet1?.

p.296:
The first two lines should read: ?by the proportion of green leaves consumed plus the conversion coefficient from brown leaves times the proportion of brown leaves . . .?

p.297, Table 12A.1.
All line numbers indexed by $ signs, referring to fixed parameter values, should have these line numbers incremented by 5 to eliminate reference to the non-existent line number 0 in column I. In addition, in column H, ?I$1? should be changed to ?I$2? (incrementing it be 5 then makes it ?I$7?). In column A, ?A0? should be changed to ?A10?.

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