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Freedom: A Philosophical Anthology

Ian Carter (Editor), Matthew H. Kramer (Editor), Hillel Steiner (Editor)
ISBN: 978-1-4051-4503-9
528 pages
January 2007, ©2006, Wiley-Blackwell
Freedom: A Philosophical Anthology (140514503X) cover image
Edited by leading contributors to the literature, Freedom: An Anthology is the most complete anthology on social, political and economic freedom ever compiled.

  • Offers a broad guide to the vast literature on social, political and economic freedom.
  • Contains selections from the best scholarship of recent decades as well as classic writings from Hobbes, Locke, Rousseau and Kant among others.
  • General and sectional introductions help to orient the reader.
  • Compiled and edited by three important contributors to the field.
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Preface.

Acknowledgements.

General Introduction.

Part I. Negative and Positive Freedom.

Introduction.

1. Thomas Hobbes, Leviathan (1651).

2. Jeremy Bentham, Of Laws in General (1782).

3. Jean-Jacques Rousseau, The Social Contract (1762).

4. Immanuel Kant, The Metaphysics of Morals (1797).

5. Benjamin Constant, The Liberty of the Ancients Compared with That of the Moderns (1819).

6. G. W. F. Hegel, The Philosophy of Right (1821).

7. Karl Marx, On the Jewish Question (1844).

8. Thomas Hill Green, Of the Different Senses of “Freedom” as Applied to Will and to the Moral Progress of Man and Lectures on the Principles of Political Obligations (1882).

9. Guido De Ruggiero, The History of European Liberalism (1925).

10. Isaiah Berlin, Two Concepts of Liberty (1969).

11. J.P. Day, On Liberty and the Real Will (1970).

12. Gerald C. MacCallum, Jr., Negative and Positive Freedom (1967).

13. John Rawls, A Theory of Justice (1971).

Part II. Freedom, Government and Arbitrary Power.

Introduction.

14. Nicolò Machiavelli, Discourses (1531).

15. Thomas Hobbes, Leviathan (1651).

16. James Harrington, The Commonwealth of Oceana (1656).

17. John Locke, Two Treatises of Government (1690).

18. Charles de Secondat, Baron de Montesquieu, The Spirit of the Laws (1748).

19. Isaiah Berlin, Two Concepts of Liberty (1969).

20. F. A. Hayek, The Constitution of Liberty (1960).

21. Philip Pettit, Republicanism (1997).

22. Quentin Skinner, Liberty before Liberalism (1998).

Part III. Freedom and the Mind.

Introduction.

23. Thomas Hobbes, Leviathan (1651).

24. J. S. Mill, On Liberty (1859).

25. Isaiah Berlin, Four Essays on Liberty (1969).

26. J. P. Day, On Liberty and the Real Will (1987).

27. John Gray, On Negative and Positive Liberty (1980).

28. Richard J. Arneson, Freedom and Desire (1985).

29. John Christman, Liberalism and Individual Positive Freedom (1991).

30. Charles Taylor, What’s Wrong with Negative Liberty (1979).

31. Christopher Megone, One Concept of Liberty (1987).

32. Richard Flathman, The Philosophy and Politics of Freedom (1987).

33. Matthew H. Kramer, The Quality of Freedom (2003).

Part IV. Freedom and Morality.

Introduction.

34. John Locke, Two Treatises of Government (1690).

35. Felix E. Oppenheim, Political Concepts (1981).

36. William E. Connolly, The Terms of Political Discourse (1993).

37. Robert Nozick, Anarchy, State and Utopia (1974).

38. G. A. Cohen, Illusions about Private Property and Freedom (1981).

39. S. I. Benn and W. L. Weinstein, Being Free to Act, and Being a Free Man (1971).

40. David Miller, Constraints on Freedom (1983).

41. Felix E. Oppenheim, Constraints on Freedom as a Descriptive Concept (1985).

42. David Miller, Reply to Oppenheim (1985).

43. Kristján Kristjánsson, Social Freedom (1996).

44. Richard Flathman, The Philosophy and Politics of Freedom (1987).

45. Hillel Steiner, An Essay on Rights (1994).

46. Matthew H. Kramer, The Quality of Freedom (2003).

Part V. Coercion.

Introduction.

47. F. A. Hayek, The Constitution of Liberty (1960).

48. Robert Nozick, Coercion (1969).

49. Robert Nozick, Anarchy, State and Utopia (1974).

50. G. A. Cohen, Self-ownership, Freedom and Equality (1995).

51. Hillel Steiner, An Essay on Rights (1994).

52. Christine Swanton, Freedom. A Coherence Theory (1992).

53. David Zimmerman, Coercive Wage Offers (1981).

54. Michael J. Gorr, Coercion, Freedom and Exploitation (1989).

55. Alan Wertheimer, Coercion (1987).

56. Serena Olsaretti, Liberty, Desert and the Market (2004).

Part VI. Autonomy.

Introduction.

57. Stanley I. Benn, A Theory of Freedom (1988).

58. Gerald Dworkin, The Theory and Practice of Autonomy (1988).

59. Onora O’Neill, Autonomy, Coherence and Independence (1992).

60. Janice Moulton and Francine Rainone, Women's Work and Sex Roles (1984).

61. Karl Marx and Friedrich Engels, The German Ideology (1846).

Part VII. Freedom, Ability and Economic Inequality.

Introduction.

62. F. A. Hayek, The Constitution of Liberty (1960).

63. Bruno Leoni, Freedom and the Law (1961).

64. Murray Rothbard, The Ethics of Liberty (1982).

65. John Rawls, A Theory of Justice (1971).

66. Philippe Van Parijs, Real Freedom for All (1995).

67. G. A. Cohen, Self-ownership, Freedom and Equality (1995).

68. Amartya Sen, Inequality Reexamined (1992).

Part VIII. Liberalism and the Value of Freedom.

Introduction.

69. J. S. Mill, On Liberty (1859).

70. J. S. Mill, On Liberty (1859).

71. Karl Popper, The Poverty of Historicism (1957).

72. F. A. Hayek, The Constitution of Liberty (1960).

73. Isaiah Berlin, Two Concepts of Liberty (1969).

74. John Rawls, Justice as Fairness. A Restatement (2001).

75. Joseph Raz, The Morality of Freedom (1986).

76. Amartya Sen, Inequality Reexamined (1992).

77. Thomas Hurka, Why Value Autonomy? (1987).

78. Joel Feinberg, The Interest in Liberty on the Scales (1978).

79. Ronald Dworkin, Taking Rights Seriously (1977).

80. Ian Carter, A Measure of Freedom (1999).

Part IX. The Measurement of Freedom.

Introduction.

81. Hillel Steiner, How Free: Computing Personal Liberty (1983).

82. Ian Carter, A Measure of Freedom (1999).

83. Prasanta Pattanaik and Yongsheng Xu, On Ranking Opportunity Sets in Terms of Freedom of Choice (1990).

84. Amartya Sen, Welfare, Freedom and Social Choice. A Reply (1990).

85. Robert Sugden, The Metric of Opportunity (1998).

86. Martin van Hees, Legal Reductionism and Freedom (2000).

Additional Writings.

Index.

.

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Ian Carter is Associate Professor in Political Philosophy at the University of Pavia, Italy.

Matthew H. Kramer is Professor of Legal and Political Philosophy at Cambridge University; Fellow of Churchill College, Cambridge; and Director of the Cambridge Forum for Legal and Political Philosophy.

Hillel Steiner is Professor of Political Philosophy at the University of Manchester.

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  • The largest collection of extracts on the philosophy of freedom ever produced.
  • Offers a broad guide to the vast literature on social, political and economic freedom.
  • Contains selections from the best scholarship of recent decades as well as classic writings from Hobbes, Locke, Rousseau and Kant among others.
  • General and sectional introductions help to orient the reader.
  • Compiled and edited by three important contributors to the field.
See More
"Those of us who work in moral and political philosophy owe a great debt of gratitude to the editors for taking such care in assembling this wonderful anthology. This is easily the best, most exhaustive collection on Freedom with which I am familiar." Christopher Wellman, Washington University in St Louis

"Among the main themes of this superb collection is that freedom has many dimensions, and among the many conditions of securing it is a willingness not to exaggerate the importance of securing everything. Every college should teach a course on freedom and its prerequisites, and Freedom: An Anthology would serve admirably as a primary reference text." David Schmidtz, University of Arizona

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