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Annual Plant Reviews, Volume 10, The Plant Cytoskeleton in Cell Differentiation and Development

ISBN: 978-1-4051-4787-3
344 pages
February 2009, Wiley-Blackwell
Annual Plant Reviews, Volume 10, The Plant Cytoskeleton in Cell Differentiation and Development (1405147873) cover image
Annual Plant Reviews, Volume 10

The cytoskeleton is a dynamic filamentous structure composed of at least actin and microtubule networks. Actin and microtubules are no different structurally from their animal and fungal counterparts. However, the strategies of cell differentiation and development in plants require this network to respond appropriately to plant-specific developmental cues and to environmental factors. This book views the cytoskeleton from different perspectives but, on the whole, as a network composed of structural and regulatory proteins controlled by internal and external stimuli that result in different aspects of cell differentiation.


This is a volume for researchers and professionals in plant biochemistry, cell biology and genetics.

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Part 1. The cytoskeleton: the machinery and key molecules.

Microtubules and microtubule-associated proteins.

Clive Lloyd and Jordi Chan, John Innes Centre, Norwich, UK and Patrick J. Hussey, Department of Biological Sciences, University of Durham, UK.

Actin and actin–modulating proteins.

Chris J. Staiger, Department of Biological Sciences, Purdue University, Indiana, USA and Patrick J. Hussey, Department of Biological Sciences, University of Durham, UK.

Part 2. Fundamental cytoskeleton activities.

Expanding beyond the great divide: the cytoskeleton and axial growth.

Geoffrey O. Wasteneys and David A. Collings, Research School of Biological Sciences, The Australian National University, Canberra, Australia.

Re-staging plant mitosis.

Magdalena Weingarner, Max-Planck-Institute of Molecular Plant Physiology, Golm, Germany, Laszlo Bögre, School of Biological Sciences, University of London, Surrey, UK and John Doonan, John Innes Centre, Norwich, UK.

Organelle movements: transport and positioning.

Franz Grolig, Fachbereich Biologie / Botanik, Philipps-Universität, Marburg, Germany.

The cell wall: a sensory panel for signal transduction.

Keiko Sugimoto-Shirasu, Nicholas C. Carpita, Department of Botany and Plant Pathology, Purdue University, Indiana, USA and Maureen McCann, John Innes Centre, Norwich, UK.

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Part 3. The cytoskeleton and plant cell morphogenesis.

Development of root hairs.

Claire Grierson and Tijs Ketelaar, School of Biological Sciences, University of Bristol, UK.

Signaling the cytoskeleton in pollen tube germination and growth.

Rui Malhó and Luísa Camacho, Departamento de Biologia Vegetal, Faculdade de Ciencias de Lisboa, Portugal.

Cytoskeletal requirements during Arabidopsis trichome development.

Mark Beilstein and Dan Szymanski, Department of Agronomy, Purdue University, Indiana, USA.

Signaling and the cytoskeleton in guard cells.

Paula Duque, Juan-Pablo Sanchez and Nam-Hai Chua Laboratory of Plant Molecular Biology, Rockefeller University, New York, USA.

References.

Index

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Professor Patrick Hussey is in the Department of Biological Sciences, University of Durham, UK.
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  • A timely review of this rapidly expanding field which capitalises on the wealth of information generated by post-genomic technologies
  • Broad coverage of the plant cytoskeleton, set in the context of plant development

  • Thoroughly referenced and so represents a point of access to the detailed literature
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"The book represents a modern, well-structured and up-to-date collection of information in a field that has rapidly advanced during the last decades, and will acquire additional impact in the field of plant development and morphogenesis." (Peter Nick, Molecular Cell Biology, Institute of Botany, University of Karlsruhe, Germany in Journal of Plant Physiology 162 (2005)).
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