Wiley
Wiley.com
Print this page Share

The Rise of Homo sapiens: The Evolution of Modern Thinking

ISBN: 978-1-4051-5253-2
320 pages
April 2009, Wiley-Blackwell
The Rise of Homo sapiens: The Evolution of Modern Thinking (1405152532) cover image
The Rise of Homo Sapiens: The Evolution of Human Thinking presents a provocative theory about the evolution of the modern mind based on archaeological evidence and the working memory model of experimental psychologist Alan Baddeley.
  • A unique introduction and primer into the new discipline of cognitive archaeology
  • Introduces scientists and college students (at all levels) to the fascinating interface between the worlds of archaeology and cognitive science
See More
1. Introduction.

2. The Brain.

3. Working Memory.

4. Brain Evolution.

5. Primates.

6. Early Hominins.

7. Homo erectus.

8. The First Major Leap in Cognition: The Tree-to-Ground Sleep Transition.

9. Homo heidelbergensis and the Beginnings of Modern Thinking.

10. The Rise and Fall of Neandertal.

11. The Second Major Leap in Cognition: Enhanced Working Memory and the Evolution of Modern Thinking.

Glossary.

References

See More
Frederick L. Coolidge is Professor of Psychology at the University of Colorado, Colorado Springs. Along with Tomas Wynn he has pubished articles in American Scientist, Current Anthropology, Cambridge Archaeological Journal, Journal of Human Evolution, and many others.

Thomas Wynn is Professor of Archaeology in the Department of Anthropology, University of Colorado.

See More
  • A unique introduction and primer into the new discipline of cognitive archaeology
  • Introduces scientists and college students (at all levels) to the fascinating interface between the worlds of archaeology and cognitive science
  • Offers a provocative hypothesis about the evolution of modern thinking based on archaeological evidence and evaluated from within the working memory model of experimental psychologist Alan Baddeley
See More
"In this well-structured book, a useful introduction lays out the main points of the volume, followed by three chapters devoted to the biological, neurological, and evolutionary aspects of the human brain . . . regardless of this difference of opinions, for those who missed the series of papers published by the two authors over the last decade, this book is a good way to catch up and to ponder some influential ideas in the research on modern humans." (Journal of the Royal Anthropological Institute, 2011)

"Coolidge and Wynn offer many useful insights into hominid cognition and provide a framework for model building and testing that can generate unequivocal results. The real contribution of The Rise of Homo sapiens, then, is not in its conclusions, but in its methodological commitments." (Journal of Anthropological Research, 2010)"The book presents some intriguing ideas and offers alternative support for those who see a recent origin for modern human behaviour." (South African Archaeological Bulletin, 2010)

“Coolidge and Wynn have written a clear, well-researched book that provides a strongly reasoned theoretical argument.” (PsycCRITIQUES, 2009)

“This volume will be of considerable interest to anyone working in the cognitive sciences, notably anthropologists, archaeologists, and neuropsychologists.” (CHOICE, October 2009)

"Thirty years ago, archaeologist Tom Wynn pioneered modern attempts to unravel the evolution of cognition by looking at the archaeology of our ancestors in the light of psychological theory.  Now he joins with psychologist Fred Coolidge to tackle the problem from both sides of the question.  As with other combined attempts, the authors found that they both learned a lot about their own disciplines from working with the other.  This resulting book is a delight and a constant source of insights.  Readers will learn about their own ways thinking, why it is as it is, and how it came to be that way.  This is a tale, both for the public and for professionals in many disciplines, told with wit and authority."
Iain Davidson, Harvard University and University of New England

"Scientific and humanistic disciplines use different approaches and different perspectives. Their combination is delicate, and necessary. Here we have an incredibly effective and successful example of the potentialities of such integration"
Emiliano Bruner, Centro Nacional de Investigación sobre la Evolución Humana (CENIEH)

"A thoughtful account of human evolution, focused on how a biological change in cognition could explain the emergence of modern humans in Africa and their subsequent expansion to Eurasia."
Richard Klein, Stanford University

See More

Related Titles

Back to Top