Wiley
Wiley.com
Print this page Share

Massage for Therapists: A Guide to Soft Tissue Therapy, 3rd Edition

ISBN: 978-1-4051-5916-6
224 pages
July 2009, Wiley-Blackwell
Massage for Therapists: A Guide to Soft Tissue Therapy, 3rd Edition (1405159162) cover image
Massage is a basic skill within physiotherapy, and one which requires a high standard of practical application. It is a skill which is increasingly being taken up by other health care and complementary therapy professionals. This new, third edition of Massage for Therapists is a timely and thorough update which continues the tradition of Margaret Hollis' hands-on approach. The book is designed to be a step-by-step guide to the theory and practical application of classical massage. Once mastered, these techniques may form the basis for a variety of modifications suitable for specific conditions.


Massage for Therapists is split into three sections: an introduction to massage and preparation for giving a massage; the massage manipulations by area of the body; and some key modifications to the standard manipulations. In order to further enhance the practitioner's skill and to give the reader a grounding in some of the popular specialities, updated chapters on aromatherapy and massage in sport sit alongside new chapters which introduce myofascial release and shiatsu.


Massage for Therapists will be of interest to student and qualified physiotherapists and sports therapists, as well as occupational therapists, chiropractors, osteopaths, nurses, complementary therapists and beauty therapists.


• Practical, applied text
• Thoroughly updated by subject experts
• Illustrated throughout with photographs which support the explanations of the therapeutic application.

See More
Trigger points.

Nerve impingement.

The nervous system.

The CNS.

The PNS.

Basic structure of the nervous system.

The neuro-endocrine mechanism.

Entrainment.

The circulatory system.

The cardiovascular system.

Function.

Structure.

Blood pressure.

The lymphatic system.

Function.

Structure.

The cerebrospinal fluid system.

Function.

Structure.

Fluid balances.

The endocrine/hormonal system. (ductless glands).

Function.

Structure.

The effects of stress on the endocrine system.

The respiratory system.

Function.

Structure.

External respiration.

Internal respiration.

Nervous and chemical control.of respiration.

The digestive system.

Function.

Structure.

The energy system.

Foreword.

Preface.

Contributors.

Acknowledgements.

I The basis for massage.

1 Introduction to massage. (Elisabeth Jones)

Western forms of massage.

Eastern forms of massage.

Globalisation.

2 Relevant anatomy and physiology: an overview. (Elisabeth Jones)

The skin.

Function.

Structure.

Appendages of the skin.

Connective tissues.

Piezo-electricity.

Fluid balances of the skin.

The musculoskeletal system.

The skeleton.

Function.

Muscles.

Function.

Structure.

Definitions associated with muscle action.

Reflexes.

Common terms.

Anatomical position.

Common terms.

3 Evidence-based effects, risk awareness and contraindications

for massage. (Dr David Lee and Carol Young)

Mechanical effects.

Physiological effects.

Physiological effects on the.circulatory system.

Physiological effects on the nervous system.

Alpha motoneuron excitability.

Pain.

Physiological effects on the musculoskeletal system.

Psychological effects.

Summary of the mechanisms of massage therapy.

Massage in vulnerable groups – risk awareness and contraindications.

Contraindications for massage therapy.

II The application of massage.

4 Examination and assessment. (Ann Thomson)

Treatment planning.

Examination of patients.

Assessing findings.

Clinical reasoning.

Clinical features that may guide the therapist towards the possible sources/causes of patients problems (the ‘genics’).

Determining the indications for massage.

Aspects of examination and assessment that relate to massage.

Observation and palpation using massage strokes to identify indications.

Observation and palpation using massage strokes to identify contraindications.

Measuring change and outcome measures.

Examination and assessment recording.

Palpation and skill.

Specific soft tissue mobilisations (SSTMs).

5 Preparation for massage. (Margaret Hollis and Elisabeth Jones)

Self preparation.

Hand exercises.

Relaxation.

The environment.

Contact mediums.

Powder.

Oils.

Liquid oils.

Creams.

Water-based lubricants.

Soap and water.

Allergic reactions.

Preparation of the patient.

Palpation and developing sensory awareness.

Examination of the part .

Ticklish subjects.

6 Massage manipulations. (Margaret Hollis and Elisabeth Jones)

Effleurage.

Stroking.

Petrissage.

Kneading.

Picking up.

Wringing.

Rolling.

Muscle shaking.

Frictions.

Circular frictions.

Transverse frictions.

Tapôtement (percussion).

Hacking.

Clapping.

Vibrations.

Beating.

Pounding.

Tapping.

7 Massage to the upper limb. (Margaret Hollis and Elisabeth Jones)

Preparation of the patient.

For a treatment in sitting position.

* From the chapter by Janice M. Warriner and the late Alison

M. Walker in the second edition of this book (Hollis

1998).

For a treatment in lying position.

To elevate the arm.

Effleurage.

To the whole limb.

Part strokes.

Kneading.

Double-handed alternate kneading.

Single-handed kneading.

Finger kneading.

Thumb kneading.

Picking up.

Wringing.

Muscle shaking.

Muscle rolling.

Hacking and clapping.

8 Massage to the lower limb. (Margaret Hollis and Elisabeth Jones)

Preparation of the patient.

Preparation of the treatment couch.

Treatment of the lower limb with the patient supine.

Treatment of the lower limb with the patient prone.

Effleurage.

To the whole limb.

Part strokes.

Kneading.

The thigh.

Round the knee.

Thumb kneading round the patella.

Finger kneading the knee.

The calf muscles.

Palmar kneading the anterior tibial muscles.

Palmar kneading the peronei.

The foot.

Thumb kneading the anterior tibial muscles.

Thumb kneading the peronea muscles.

Thumb kneading the dorsum of the foot.

Thumb kneading the sole of the foot.

Thumb kneading the interosseous spaces.

Thumb and finger kneading the toes.

Picking up.

The thigh.

The calf.

Wringing.

The thigh.

The calf.

Muscle shaking.

The thigh.

The calf.

Skin rolling and skin wringing.

The knee.

Hacking and clapping.

The thigh.

The calf.

The anterior tibial and peroneal muscles.

9 Massage to the back, gluteal region and neck.(Margaret Hollis and Elisabeth Jones)

The thoracolumbar region.

Preparation of the patient.

Preparation of the treatment couch.

Treatment of the patient in prone lying.

Effleurage.

Kneading.

Alternate, double-handed kneading.

Single-handed kneading.

Superimposed kneading.

Thumb kneading.

Finger kneading.

Skin rolling.

Wringing.

Muscle rolling.

Hacking and clapping.

The gluteal region.

Preparation of the patient.

Effleurage.

Kneading.

Superimposed kneading.

Frictions.

Circular frictions.

Picking up.

Wringing.

Hacking and clapping.

The neck.

Client in prone lying.

Client in lying.

Client in side lying.

Client in forward lean sitting.

Effleurage.

Kneading.

Picking up.

Muscle rolling.

Hacking and clapping.

10 Massage to the face and scalp. (Margaret Hollis and Elisabeth Jones)

Preparation of the patient.

Face massage.

Effleurage.

Kneading.

Wringing.

Plucking.

Tapping.

Vibrations.

Exit foramina of the trigeminal nerve.

Over the sinuses.

Muscle stretching.

Occipitofrontalis.

Clapping.

To the platysma.

Scalp massage.

Effleurage/stroking.

Kneading.

Vibrations.

11 Massage to the abdomen. (Margaret Hollis and Elisabeth Jones)

Preparation of the patient.

Palpation.

Effleurage.

Kneading.

Vibrations.

Brisk lift stroking and shaking.

Stroking.

The ascending colon.

The transverse colon.

The descending colon.

Kneading.

The ascending colon.

The descending colon.

Rolling.

Skin wringing.

Points to be observed.

12 Uses of classical massage in some health care settings: an overview. (Elisabeth Jones)

Stress.

Depression.

Anxiety.

Occupational situations.

Pre natal, labour and post natal.

Babies.

Children.

The older population.

Learning disabilities.

Mental health.

Physical disabilities.

Neuromuscular-skeletal conditions.

Neurological conditions.

Cancer care.

Contraindications/precautions.

HIV/AIDS.

Pain.

Respiratory conditions.

Reconstructive surgery.

Scar management.

Desensitisation.

Oedema management.

III Some specialised techniques.

13 Some types of massage and soft tissue therapies (Elisabeth Jones)

Active release technique (ART).

Acupressure.

Animal massage.

Aromatherapy.

Ayurvedic massage.

Bio-energy therapies.

Bowen therapy.

Classical massage.

Connective tissue manipulation (CTM).

Craniosacral therapy.

Heller work.

Indian head massage.

Lomi lomi.

Manual lymph drainage (MLD).

Muscle energy technique (MET).

Myofascial release (MFR).

Neuromuscular therapy.

Periosteal massage.

Pin and stretch.

Polarity therapy.

Positional release.

Proprioceptive neuromuscular facilitation (PNF).

Hold relax (HR) (contract relax.

Auto hold relax.

Repeated contractions (RC).

Combining repeated contractions with soft tissue techniques.

Slow reversals (SR).

Stabilisations.

Reflexology.

Rolfing (structural integration).

Segment massage.

Shiatsu.

Soft tissue release (STR).

Specific soft tissue mobilisations (SSTMs).

Specific stretch.

Sports massage.

Swedish massage.

Thai massage (Thai yoga massage).

Therapeutic touch.

Trager.

Transcadence massage.

Trigger point release.

Tuina/tui na (pronounced tweena).

Vibrational therapy (VT).

Zero balancing.

14 Massage in sport. (Joan M. Watt)

Basic rules of sports massage.

Diagnosis.

History.

Contraindications.

Aims of treatment.

Position.

Materials.

Skin preparation.

Joint position.

Technique.

Check with the participant.

Clean up.

Warn the participant.

Massage manipulations in sports massage.

Acupressure.

Trigger pointing.

Ice massage.

Specific sports massage.

Massage in conditioning.

Massage as a treatment.

Pre-competition massage.

Inter-competition massage.

Post-competition massage.

Post-travel massage.

Non-specific sports massage.

General body massage.

Specific areas of massage.

Summary.

Case study.

15 Aromatherapy. (Elisabeth Jones)

Introduction.

Historical uses of essential oils.

Egyptians: 3000–1500 BC.

Greeks: 500–40 BC.

Europeans.

Essential oils.

Basic chemistry.

Mind and body.

Extraction methods.

A working knowledge of essential oils.

Methods of administering essential oils.

Olfaction.

Inhalation.

Skin absorption.

Ingestion.

Glossary of terms and properties of some essential oils.

The practical application of essential oils.

Olfaction/inhalation.

Skin absorption.

Ingestion.

The holistic approach.

Aromatherapy massage.

Lymphatic drainage.

Neuromuscular massage.

Acupressure.

Effects and uses of aromatherapy massage.

Muscle tension.

Blood circulation.

Pain.

Fatigue.

Infection.

Relaxation.

One-to-one care.

Support for staff and carers.

Sleep.

General wellbeing.

Pregnancy/childbirth/baby care.

The elderly.

Consultation procedures.

Verbal.

Visual.

Tactile.

Personality type.

Other information.

Oils.

Contraindications.

Hazards.

Oils not to be used at all in therapy.

Oils never to be used on the skin.

Oils not to be used with patients who have epilepsy.

Pregnancy.

Precautions.

Blending of oils and formulation.

Basic formula.

Preparation of the patient.

Treatment by aromatherapy massage.

Case study.

Purity of essential oils.

Storage.

Conclusion.

16 Shiatsu – the Japanese healing art of touch. (Andrea Battermann)

Introduction.

What is shiatsu?

History.

Introduction to oriental medicine.

Diagnostic methods.

Four forms of diagnosis.

Shiatsu theory.

Basic principles and techniques of shiatsu.

Clinical indications.

Contraindications.

Cautions.

Physiological effects associated with shiatsu.

Case study: self-shiatsu massage.

The self-shiatsu routine.

How to apply pressure.

Professional development of the therapist.

Conclusions.

Glossary.

17 Myofascial release and beyond. (Ann Childs and Stuart Robinson)

Introduction to the fascial matrix.

Aims of the MFR approach.

Palpation philosophy and possible barriers to effectiveness.

Exercises to enhance palpatory skills.

Exercise 1: Attuning whole and bilateral hand sensitivity.

Exercise 2: Enhancing palpatory sensitivity.

Exercise 3: Palpating fascial glide.

Exercise 4: Influence of palpation and body tension.

Exercise 5: Palpation changes with different states of mind.

Exercise 6: Identifi cation and documentation of fascial restrictions.

Exercise 7: Identification of the dominant holding pattern in the body.

Myofascial release techniques.

A sustained stretch technique.

Contraindications.

Beyond the anatomy.

Involving the mind and feelings.

An exploration of suggested rationale and their clinical implications.

Responsive biomechanical model.

Neural-mechanoreceptor model.

Gel-to-sol model.

Piezo-electric model.

Trauma release model.

Evidence of effectiveness in clinical practice.

So what do we feel with our hands?

Future implications.

Index.

See More
Elisabeth Jones is a chartered physiotherapist who has lectured and taught massage and aromatherapy worldwide, and run a training centre for massage, aromatherapy and reflexology for over 25 years. She has worked in the NHS, in nursing homes and in private practice, and currently runs her own private practice.
See More

  • Practical, applied text

  • Thoroughly updated by subject experts

  • Illustrated throughout with photographs which support the explanations of the therapeutic application.

See More
"This book would be a invaluable reference for any physical therapist wanting both consolidation and increased depth of knowledge of massage techniques. Some sections of the book will be of particular use to undergraduate students, postgraduate students and professionals, as they describe the theoretical underpinning and clinical reasoning for massage therapy. I recommend that physical therapists who work in clinical settings, hospitals, institutions and the other rehabilitation centres should read this book in order to enhance their clinical skills and to augment the efficacy of their treatments." (International Journal of Therapy and Rehabilitation, October 2010)

See More
Buy Both and Save 25%!
+

Massage for Therapists: A Guide to Soft Tissue Therapy, 3rd Edition (US $66.99)

-and- Exercise Therapy in the Management of Musculoskeletal Disorders (US $62.99)

Total List Price: US $129.98
Discounted Price: US $97.48 (Save: US $32.50)

Buy Both
Cannot be combined with any other offers. Learn more.

Related Titles

Back to Top