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Colonialism and Grammatical Representation: John Gilchrist and the Analysis of the Hindustani Language in the late Eighteenth and Early Nineteenth Centuries

ISBN: 978-1-4051-6132-9
296 pages
June 2007, Wiley-Blackwell
Colonialism and Grammatical Representation: John Gilchrist and the Analysis of the Hindustani Language in the late Eighteenth and Early Nineteenth Centuries (1405161329) cover image
A detailed study of Gilchrist’s grammatical praxis which presents a picture of the complex relationship between grammatical inquiry and the politics of colonial discourse in the early years of the Indian Empire.

  • Develops a method of reading colonial grammars that acknowledges both the technical and the political dimensions of the text
  • Explores the political consequences of the choices that grammarians made that could easily elicit reactions of fear, confusion, and even contempt in colonial observers
  • Presents a picture of the complex relationship between grammatical inquiry and the politics of colonial discourse in the early years of the Indian Empire
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Preface.

Introduction.

Part I: Contexts:.

1. The Political Context.

2. The Personal Context.

3. The Intellectual Context.

Part II: Case Studies:.

4. Noun Case.

5. The Verbal System.

6. Dialogues and Familiar Phrases.

7. Etymology.

Conclusion.

Bibliography

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Richard Steadman-Jones teaches in the School of English at the University of Sheffield.
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  • A detailed analysis of John Gilchrist’s work on the ‘Hindustani’ language
  • Develops a method of reading colonial grammars that acknowledges both the technical and the political dimensions of the text
  • Explores the political consequences of the choices that grammarians made that could easily elicit reactions of fear, confusion, and even contempt in colonial observers
  • Presents a picture of the complex relationship between grammatical inquiry and the politics of colonial discourse in the early years of the Indian Empire
See More
"Steadman-Jones deftly weaves his biographical, political and linguistic strands into an engrossing account." (Historiographia Linguistica, April 2009)
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