Wiley
Wiley.com
Print this page Share

A Brief History of Liberty

ISBN: 978-1-4051-7079-6
280 pages
February 2010, Wiley-Blackwell
A Brief History of Liberty (1405170794) cover image
Through a fusion of philosophical, social scientific, and historical methods, A Brief History of Liberty provides a comprehensive, philosophically-informed portrait of the elusive nature of one of our most cherished ideals.
  • Offers a succinct yet thorough survey of personal freedom
  • Explores the true meaning of liberty, drawing philosophical lessons about liberty from history
  • Considers the writings of key historical figures from Socrates and Erasmus to Hobbes, Locke, Marx, and Adam Smith
  • Combines philosophical rigor with social scientific analysis
  • Argues that liberty refers to a range of related but specific ideas rather than limiting the concept to one definition
See More

Acknowledgments vii

Introduction: Conceptions of Freedom 1

1 A Prehistory of Liberty: Forty Thousand Years Ago 30

2 The Rule of Law: ad 1075 60

3 Religious Freedom: 1517 93

4 Freedom of Commerce: 1776 120

5 Civil Liberty: 1954 169

6 Psychological Freedom, the Last Frontier: 1963 208

Bibliography 244

Index 261

See More
David Schmidtz is Kendrick Professor of Philosophy, joint Professor of Economics, and Director of the Freedom Center at the University of Arizona. His articles have appeared in the Journal of Philosophy, Ethics, and Political Theory.

Jason Brennan is Assistant Professor of Philosophy, Research, at Brown University, and a faculty associate of the Political Theory Project at Brown University. His articles have appeared in Philosophy and Phenomenological Research, The Australasian Journal of Philosophy, and Ratio.

See More

 

  • Offers a succinct yet thorough survey of personal freedom
  • Explores the true meaning of liberty, drawing philosophical lessons about liberty from history
  • Considers the writings of key historical figures from Socrates and Erasmus to Hobbes, Locke, Marx, and Adam Smith
  • Combines philosophical rigor with social scientific analysis
  • Argues that liberty refers to a range of related but specific ideas rather than limiting the concept to one definition
See More
"Although the book has a strongly classical liberal flavour, it also contains some interesting discussion of positive liberty. For one thing, Schmidtz and Brennan argue that the progress of negative liberty in western societies has massively expanded almost everyone's range of real options. For another, they suggest that this greater (negative and positive) external freedom can open the way to a greater internal or psychological" freedom". (The Philosophers' Magazine, 13 August 2010)

"Its brevity and simplicity is perhaps understandable, given the historical focus and ambitious scope of the book, and the authors' evident desire to get the light, entertaining and up-beat narrative moving." (The Philosopher's Magazine, August 2010)"The book weaves together a number of figures in social, political, philosophical, economic, and even psychological theory, in a way not commonly found, and it does so rather effectively." (Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews, September 05, 2010)

"Schmidtz and Brennan offer their readers insights into the freedom debate by following it through the broad sweep of Western history...[A Brief History of Liberty]... comprehensive notes and bibliographies and...deserve[s] to be taken seriously by those with an interest in liberty." (The Philosopher, summer 2010)

See More
February 03, 2010
A Brief History of Liberty

Liberty is a lofty and noble concept. But what exactly is liberty? What value does it have? And what specific benefits and dangers are inherent in so-called free societies? In A BRIEF HISTORY OF LIBERTY (March 2010 (U.S.); January 2010 (UK)) David Schmidtz and Jason Brennan recall the history of human liberty in all its forms: legal, cultural, political, economic, religious, and  psychological.

Compared to our ancestors, for whom starvation, war, and deadly disease were the stuff of everyday life, our most daunting struggle for liberty today is often psychological. Instead of considering ourselves free, the authors say we are “adept at snatching defeat from the jaws of victory,” and are shackled by social and professional pressure, self-deception, and discontent (Chapter 6: Psychological Freedom, The Last Frontier: 1963). History has a lot to teach us about personal freedom: getting it, maintaining it, and learning from it so we have more of a real choice when it comes to pursuing liberty in its truest form.

The authors distinguish between being “free to” pursue happiness (positive freedom), as opposed to being “free from” oppression, slavery, or hunger (negative freedom), yet stress that, “this is a history of liberty, not a history of theorizing about liberty.”

A key turning point in our pursuit of freedom occurred when homo sapiens gained the capacities for trade and, more fundamentally, speech, while the Neanderthals failed to develop these skills and perished as a consequence. Human trade become so developed that by the 12th century we embarked on spiritual trading, the idea that one could avoid purgatory through prayers and good works. Martin Luther (and later John Knox) challenged this type of thinking in the early 16th century and strove to “break the Catholic monopoly on faith.” (Chapter 3: Religious Freedom: 1517)


The authors explain that cultural change sets the stage for heroic individual catalysts and the authors vividly recall their stories. Roger Williams fled London for Boston in 1630, and later founded a colony (Rhode Island) built on the principle of the freedom of religion, which would later inspire the First Amendment of the US Constitution. The groundwork laid by civil rights’ founding fathers such as Frederick Douglass, Booker T. Washington, W. E.B. Dubois (NAACP), Martin Luther King, and Thurgood Marshall (Brown v. Board of Education) led to the Civil Rights Act of 1964(Chapter 5: Civil Liberty: 1954).

The authors explore the institutions that promote liberty and how governments become tyrannical (French Revolution; KGB). The rule of law was established in 10th century England to keep the peace and limit the king’s power to tax. Economic liberty, explored in depth by Scottish thinker Adam Smith, is increasingly present in today’s society. Khrushchev became incredulous at the opulence of the common American house in 1959 during a visit with Nixon. The authors point out, “In constant dollars, the United States today has an economic output that is about fifty percent greater than the entire world’s output in 1950.” (Chapter 4: Freedom of Commerce: 1776)

Above all, the authors ask the question: “Is the greatest freedom the absence of want or desire?” Roosevelt defined his dream for the American people as, “Freedom from want.” The authors conclude that what we really want is freedom with real choice, having options and the autonomy to fully exercise them.

See More
Buy Both and Save 25%!
+

A Brief History of Liberty (US $35.95)

-and- A Brief History of Justice (US $32.95)

Total List Price: US $68.90
Discounted Price: US $51.67 (Save: US $17.23)

Buy Both
Cannot be combined with any other offers. Learn more.

Related Titles

Back to Top