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A Companion to Roman Rhetoric

William Dominik (Editor), Jon Hall (Editor)
ISBN: 978-1-4051-7198-4
544 pages
April 2008, Wiley-Blackwell
A Companion to Roman Rhetoric (1405171987) cover image
A Companion to Roman Rhetoric introduces the reader to the wide-ranging importance of rhetoric in Roman culture.
  • A guide to Roman rhetoric from its origins to the Renaissance and beyond
  • Comprises 32 original essays by leading international scholars
  • Explores major figures Cicero and Quintilian in-depth
  • Covers a broad range of topics such as rhetoric and politics, gender, status, self-identity, education, and literature
  • Provides suggestions for further reading at the end of each chapter
  • Includes a glossary of technical terms and an index of proper names and rhetorical concepts
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Notes on Contributors.

Preface.

Texts and Abbreviations.

Part I: Approaching Rhetoric.

1. Confronting Roman Rhetoric (William Dominik and Jon Hall).

2. Modern Critical Approaches to Roman Rhetoric (John Dugan).

3. Greek Rhetoric Meets Rome: Expansion, Resistance, and Acculturation (Sarah Culpepper Stroup).

4. Native Roman Rhetoric: Plautus and Terence (John Barsby).

5. Roman Oratory Before Cicero: The Elder Cato and Gaius Gracchus (Enrica Sciarrino).

Part II: Rhetoric and Its Social Context.

6. Rhetorical Education and Social Reproduction in the Republic and Early Empire (Anthony Corbeill).

7. Virile Tongues: Rhetoric and Masculinity (Joy Connolly).

8. Oratory, Rhetoric, and Politics in the Republic (Michael C. Alexander).

9. Oratory and Politics in the Empire (Steven H. Rutledge).

10. Roman Senatorial Oratory (John Ramsey).

11. Panegyric (Roger Rees).

12. Roman Oratorical Invective (Valentina Arena).

Part III: Systematizing Rhetoric.

13. Roman Rhetorical Handbooks (Robert N. Gaines).

14. Elocutio: Latin Prose Style (Roderich Kirchner).

15. Memory and the Roman Orator (Jocelyn Penny Small).

16. Wit and Humor in Roman Rhetoric (Edwin Rabbie).

17. Oratorical Delivery and the Emotions: Theory and Practice (Jon Hall).

Part IV: Rhetoricians and Orators.

18. Lost Orators of Rome (Catherine Steel).

19. Cicero as Rhetorician (James M. May).

20. Cicero as Orator (Christopher P. Craig).

21. Grammarians and Rhetoricians (Charles McNelis).

22. Roman Declamation: The Elder Seneca and Quintilian (W. Martin Bloomer).

23. Quintilian as Rhetorician and Teacher (Jorge Fernández López).

24. Tacitus and Pliny on Oratory (William Dominik).

25. Rhetoric and the Second Sophistic (Graham Anderson).

26. Roman Rhetoric and its Afterlife (John O. Ward).

Part V: Rhetoric and Roman Literature.

27. Rhetoric and Literature at Rome (Matthew Fox).

28. Rhetoric and Epic: Vergil’s Aeneid and Lucan’s Bellum Civile (Emanuele Narducci).

29. Rhetoric and Satire: Horace, Persius, and Juvenal (Dan Hooley).

30. Rhetoric and Ovid (Ulrike Auhagen).

31. Rhetoric and the Younger Seneca (Marcus Wilson).

32. Rhetoric and Historiography (Cynthia Damon).

Bibliography.

Glossary of Technical Terms.

Index Locorum.

General Index.

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William Dominik is Professor of Classics at the University of Otago. He is a contributor to A Companion to Ancient Epic (2005) and A Companion to the Classical Tradition (2006). He has also published numerous books, chapters, and articles on Roman literature and other topics.

Jon Hall is Senior Lecturer in Classics at the University of Otago. He is the author of numerous articles and chapters on Cicero’s oratory and rhetorical treatises. He has also completed a book on Cicero’s correspondence.
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  • A guide to Roman rhetoric from its origins to the Renaissance and beyond.

  • Comprises 32 original essays by leading international scholars.

  • Explores major figures Cicero and Quintilian in-depth.

  • Covers a broad range of topics such as rhetoric and politics, gender, status, self-identity, education, and literature.

  • Provides suggestions for further reading at the end of each chapter.

  • Includes a glossary of technical terms and an index of proper names and rhetorical concepts.
See More
"Dominik and Hall have produced a solid, well-structured and accessible piece of work, which not only provides an excellent starting point to newcomers, but also contains a number of original contributions that will be of interest to more advanced scholars." (Scholia Reviews, June 2010)

"This Blackwell Companion successfully communicates the efflorescence of Roman rhetorical practices and the centrality of rhetoric in Roman thought." (Classical World, June 2009)

"Students at all levels will benefit from reading these essays, both for their intrinsic scholarship and for the guidance they give, through copious bibliographical reference, towards further research…an important contribution to Blackwell’s catalogue of classical titles." (The Classical Review, Vol 58 No. 1 2008)

"Dominik and Hall's [book] will be welcomed by those seeking capable introductions to the areas it treats. Through an array of open-minded contributions [it] usefully introduces the main scholarly issues in Roman rhetoric and oratory, outlining how far the field has come and the opportunities and complications that lie ahead."(Bryn Mawr Classical Review)

"A significant major contribution that adds further prestige to a very major series." (Reference Reviews)

"A short review cannot begin to do justice to the immense range of material covered here … This excellent Companion will tell most readers all they need to know about Roman rhetoric." (Journal of Classics Teaching)

"This welcome addition … fills a void long empty in classical scholarship … . Every library, if not every Classics department, should own a copy." (New England Classical Journal)

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