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Value Chain Struggles: Institutions and Governance in the Plantation Districts of South India

ISBN: 978-1-4051-7393-3
320 pages
April 2009, Wiley-Blackwell
Value Chain Struggles: Institutions and Governance in the Plantation Districts of South India (1405173939) cover image
Adopting a 'global value chain' approach, Value Chain Struggles investigates the impact of new trading arrangements in the coffee and tea sectors on the lives and in the communities of growers in South India.
  • Offers a timely analysis of the social hardships of tea and coffee producers
  • Takes the reader into the lives of growers in Southern India who are struggling with issues of value chain restructuring
  • Reveals the ways that the restructuring triggers a series of political and economic struggles across a range of economic, social, and environmental arenas
  • Puts into perspective claims about the impacts of recent changes to global trading relations on rural producers in developing countries
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List of Figures.

List of Tables.

Series Editors’ Preface.

Acknowledgements.

List of Abbreviations.

1 Introduction.

2 Re-inserting Place and Institutions within Global Value Chain Analysis.

3 How to Make a (South Indian) Cup of Tea or Coffee.

4 The Institutional Environment of the South Indian Tea and Coffee Industries.

5 Struggles over Labour and Livelihoods.

6 Struggles over Environmental Governance in the Coffee Forests of Kodagu.

7 Smallholder Engagement in Global Value Chains: Initiatives in the Nilgiris.

8 Making a Living in the Global Economy:  Institutional Environments and Value Chain Upgrading.

9 Conclusion: What We Brewed.

Appendix A: The Role of Managing Agents.

Appendix B: The Operation and Intended Reform of South India’s Tea Auctions.

Appendix C: Restructuring of Tata Tea’s Munnar Operations.

Notes.

Bibliography.

Index.

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Jeff Neilson maintains primary research interests in rural development and environmental issues across various Asian countries. He completed his PhD with a study of the Indonesian coffee industry, has authored twelve refereed publications, and has worked as a consultant to various international development agencies. Dr Neilson is currently employed as a post-doctoral research fellow in geography at the University of Sydney, Australia.

Bill Pritchard is an Economic Geographer whose research has focused on global change in agriculture, food and rural places. He has authored two books, edited four others, and written more than forty refereed publications. He is an active member and former convener of the Australia & New Zealand Agri-Food Research Network, a member of the Australian Research Council Research Network on Spatially Integrated Social Sciences, and Steering Committee Member of the International Geographical Union Commission on the Dynamics of Economic Spaces.

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  • Offers a timely analysis of the social hardships of tea and coffee producers
  • Takes the reader into the lives of growers in Southern India who are struggling with issues of value chain restructuring
  • Reveals the ways that the restructuring triggers a series of political and economic struggles across a range of economic, social and environmental arenas
  • Puts into perspective claims about the impacts of recent changes to global trading relations on rural producers in developing countries
See More
 

"Extremely well written, clearly argued and nicely illustrated, this book offers a wonderfully detailed case study of tea and coffee cultivation in South India - in all its multi-scalar institutional and regulatory contexts - and yet also speaks powerfully to a variety of wider theoretical issues concerning global value chains, global private regulation, and ethical and sustainable production schemes."
Neil Coe, University of Manchester

"This book gets to the roots of new trading arrangements in the coffee and tea sectors which affect the lives of struggling growers in South India. Adoption of a meaningful global value chain approach that links production, trade and consumption is the unique feature of this book. Arrays of issues including history, geography, politics and culture at local, regional and national levels have been covered. It is certainly a valuable, scholarly and policy contribution."
P. G. Chengappa, Vice Chancellor, University of Agricultural Sciences, Bangalore, India

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