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Handbook of Personality and Self-Regulation

Rick H. Hoyle (Editor)
ISBN: 978-1-4051-7712-2
542 pages
February 2010, Wiley-Blackwell
Handbook of Personality and Self-Regulation (1405177128) cover image
The Handbook of Personality and Self-Regulation integrates scholarly research on self-regulation in the personality, developmental, and social psychology traditions for a broad audience of social and behavioral scientists interested in the processes by which people control, or fail to control, their own behavior.
  • Examines self-regulation as it influences and is influenced by basic personality processes in normal adults
  • Offers 21 original contributions from an internationally respected group of scholars in the fields of personality and self-regulation
  • Explores the causes and consequences of inadequate self-regulation and the means by which self-regulation might be improved
  • Integrates empirical findings on basic personality traits with findings inspired by emerging models of self-regulation
  • Provides a comprehensive, up-to-date, and stimulating view of the field for students and researchers in a wide range of disciplines
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About the Editor.

List of Contributors.

Preface.

1. Personality and Self-Regulation (Rick H. Hoyle, Duke University).

I: TEMPERAMENT AND EARLY PERSONALITY.

2. Relations of Self-Regulatory/Control Capacities to Maladjustment, Social Competence, and Emotionality (Nancy Eisenberg, Arizona State University, Natalie D. Eggum, Arizona State University, Julie Vaughan,Arizona State University, and Alison Edwards, Arizona State University ).

3. Delay of Gratification: A Review of Fifty Years of Regulation Research (Renée M. Tobin, Illinois State University and William G. Graziano, Purdue University ).

4. Self-Regulation as the Interface of Emotional and Cognitive Development: Implications for Education and Academic Achievement (Clancy Blair, New York University, Susan Calkins, University of North Carolina at Greensboro and Lisa Kopp Pennsylvania State University ).

5. Exploring Response-Monitoring: Developmental Differences and Contributions to Self-Regulation (Jennifer M. McDermott, University of Maryland and Nathan A. Fox, University of Maryland ).

II: PERSONALITY PROCESSES.

6. Signatures and Self-Regulation Processing: Dynamics of the Self-System (Carolyn C. Morf, University of Bern and Stephan Horvath, University of Bern ).

7. Self-Regulation and the Five-Factor Model of Personality Traits (Robert R. McCrae, Baltimore and Corinna E. Löckenhoff, Cornell University).

8. Self-Determination Theory and the Relation of Autonomy to Self-Regulatory Processes and Personality Development (Christopher P. Niemiec,University of Rochester, Richard M. Ryan, University of Rochester and Edward L. Deci, University of Rochester ).

9. Interest and Self-Regulation: Understanding Individual Variability in Choices, Efforts and Persistence Over Time (Carol Sansone, University of Utah, Dustin B. Thoman, University of Utah and Jessi L. Smith, Montana State University ).

10. Goal Systems and Self-Regulation: An Individual Differences Perspective (Paul Karoly, Arizona State University ).

11. Acting on Limited Resources: The Interactive Effects of Self-Regulatory Depletion and Individual Differences (C. Nathan DeWall, University of Kentucky, Roy F. Baumeister, Florida State University, David R. Schurtz, University of Kentucky and Matthew T. Gailliot, University of Amsterdam ).

III: INDIVIDUAL DIFFERENCES.

12. Working Memory Capacity and Self-Regulation (Malgorzata Ilkowska, Georgia Institute of Technolog and Randall W. Engle, Georgia Institute of Technolog ).

13. Regulatory Focus in a Demanding World (Abigail A. Scholer, Columbia University and E. Tory Higgins, Columbia University ).

14. Self-Efficacy (James E. Maddux, George Mason University and Jeffrey Volkmann, George Mason University ).

15. Dealing with High Demands: The Role of Action versus State Orientation (Nils B. Jostmann, Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam and Sander L. Koole, Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam ).

16. The Cybernetic Process Model of Self-Control: Situation- and Person-Specific Considerations (Eran Magen, University of Pennsylvania and James J. Gross, Stanford University ).

17. Modes of Self-Regulation: Assessment and Locomotion as Independent Determinants in Goal-Pursuit (Arie W. Kruglanski, University of Maryland, Edward Orehek, University of Maryland, Tory Higgins, Columbia University, Antonio Pierro, University of Rome “La Sapienza” and Idit Shalev, University of Florida ).

18. The Costly Pursuit of Self-Esteem: Implications for Self-Regulation (Jennifer Crocker, University of Michigan, Scott Moeller, University of Michigan and Aleah Burson, University of Michigan ).

19. Self-Regulation of State Self-Esteem Following Threat: Moderation by Trait Self-Esteem (Michelle R. vanDellen, University of Georgia, Erin K. Bradfield, Duke University and Rick H. Hoyle, Duke University).

20. Individual Differences in Approach and Avoidance: Behavioral Activation/Inhibition and Regulatory Focus as Distinct Levels of Analysis (Timothy J. Strauman, Duke University and Wilkie A. Wilson, Duke University).

21. Hypo-egoic Self-Regulation (Mark R. Leary, Duke University, Claire E. Adams, Louisiana State University and Eleanor B. Tate, Duke University ).

Index.

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Rick H. Hoyle, PhD, is Professor of Psychology and Neuroscience at Duke University. He is a Fellow of the American Psychological Association (Divisions 5, Evaluation, Measurement, and Statistics, and 9, Society for the Psychological Study of Social Issues) and a Fellow and Charter Member of the Association for Psychological Science. Dr. Hoyle has served as Associate Editor of the Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, Journal of Personality, and Self and Identity and Editor of Journal of Social Issues. Among his book projects are, Selfhood: Identity, Esteem, Regulation (co-authored with Michael Kernis, Mark Leary, and Mark Baldwin) and the Handbook of Individual Differences in Social Behavior (co-edited with Mark Leary).
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  • Examines self-regulation as it influences and is influenced by basic personality processes in normal adults
  • Offers 21 original contributions from an internationally respected group of scholars in the fields of personality and self-regulation
  • Explores the causes and consequences of inadequate self-regulation and the means by which self-regulation might be improved
  • Integrates empirical findings on basic personality traits with findings inspired by emerging models of self-regulation
  • Provides a comprehensive, up-to-date, and stimulating view of the field for students and researchers in a wide range of disciplines
See More
"This handbook serves as a significant tool for those seeking to understand the complexities of self-regulation. Hoyle (Duke Univ.) has brought together an impressive contingent of authors and developed a work that balances theoretical foundations and practical applications. The contributors do a masterful job of integrating what have often seemed disparate findings in the self-regulation literature...Those working with individuals who have self-regulatory issues are likely to find this volume particularly useful. Summing Up: Highly recommended." (Choice, 1 May 2011)

"Rick H. Hoyle has used the study of self-regulation to draw together exciting findings from the usually disparate areas of information processing, temperament/personality, developmental and social psychology. Psychologists from these areas will add breadth and integration to their models of self-regulation, and clinical psychologists will greatly benefit from reading this book."
Mary K. Rothbart, Distinguished Professor of Psychology Emerita, University of Oregon

"Failure to self-regulate is associated with personal and societal costs (e.g., obesity, alcohol consumption, excessive lending or borrowing, and high-risk investments). Zeal in self-regulating can also be maladaptive, as it is associated with inhibition of emotional expression and authentic behavior. Twenty one chapters from front-line experts offer thoughtful analyses of temperamental and personality substrates of self-regulation along with their interplay with social behavior. This book promises to be an indispensable resource for researchers and practitioners, as well as both graduate and advanced undergraduate students."
Constantine Sedikides, University of Southampton

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