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Medicines Management: A Guide for Nurses

Philip Jevon (Editor), Liz Payne (Editor), Dan Higgins (Editor), Ruth Endecott (Editor)
ISBN: 978-1-4051-8163-1
320 pages
May 2010, Wiley-Blackwell
Medicines Management: A Guide for Nurses (140518163X) cover image
The safe and effective management of medicines is an essential clinical skill, accounting for up to 40% of a nurse’s time within practice. Medicines Management provides nurses with a clear, concise and practical exploration of their role in pharmacology and medicines management. It explains what is meant by medicines management, discusses the current professional and legal context, and gives insight into the reasons why mistakes are made.

Focusing predominantly on the principles of safe drug administration, this pocket-sized text also explores legal and professional issues, medication errors, administration of oral medication, injections, and intravenous fluids and medicines, medication management in children, and basic pharmacology of common medications.

  • In the Essential Clinical Skills for Nurses series
  • Case studies and examples provided throughout
  • Focuses on safe medicines management in day-to-day clinical practice
  • Appendices with a glossary of terms and a list of abbreviations (Latin and English), and units of measurement
  • Includes a chapter on paediatric considerations
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Foreword (Jane Hare).

Contributors list.

Chapter 1 Introduction to medicines management (Ruth Endacott).

Chapter 2 Legal issues of medicines management (Richard Griffith).

Chapter 3 Safety in medicines management (Elizabeth Payne).

Chapter 4 Prescription of medicines (Elizabeth Payne).

Chapter 5 Systems for medicines administration (Kate Roland and Ruth Endacott).

Chapter 6 Principles of safe administration of medicines (Dan Higgins).

Chapter 7 Medication errors (Ruth Endacott).

Chapter 8 Basic pharmacology of common medications (Gareth Walters).

Chapter 9 Administration of oral medication (Brian Gammon and Dan Higgins).

Chapter 10 Administration of injections (Janet Hunter).

Chapter 11 Administration of intravenous fluids and medicines (Dan Higgins).

Chapter 12 Miscellaneous routes of medication administration (Matthew Aldridge).

Chapter 13 Medicines management in children (Elizabeth Payne).

Chapter 14 Nurse prescribing (Elizabeth Payne).

Index.

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Philip Jevon, RN BSc(Hons) PGCE, is Resuscitation Officer/Clinical Skills Lead, Manor Hospital, Walsall, UK; Honorary Clinical Lecturer, University of Birmingham, UK.

Elizabeth Payne, BSc(Hons) in Pharmacy, MSc in Clinical Pharmacy, MRPharmS, is Deputy Director of Pharmacy, Education, Training and Staff Performance, Manor Hospital, Walsall, UK.

Dan Higgins, RGN, ENB 100, ENB 998, is Senior Charge Nurse Critical Care, University HospitalsBirmingham NHS Foundation Trust and Consultant/Honorary Lecturer Resuscitation Services UK and Visiting Clinical Lecturer at University of Birmingham, UK.

Ruth Endacott is Professor of Clinical Nursing at the University of Plymouth, UK andLa Trobe University, Australia.

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  • In the Essential Clinical Skills for Nurses series
  • Case studies and examples provided throughout
  • Focuses on safe medicines management in day to day clinical practice
  • Appendices with a glossary of terms, and a list of abbreviations (Latin and English) and units of measurement
  • Includes a chapter on paediatric considerations
See More
“This is an excellent guide on safe and effective medicines management. It is essential that all nurses be competent in the area of medication administration, and this handy resource is a user-friendly guide that will be valuable for a variety of healthcare providers.”  (Doddy's, 20 April 2012)

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