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The New Media and Cybercultures Anthology

Pramod K. Nayar (Editor)
ISBN: 978-1-4051-8308-6
568 pages
April 2010, Wiley-Blackwell
The New Media and Cybercultures Anthology (140518308X) cover image
Moving beyond traditional cyberculture studies paradigms in several key ways, this comprehensive collection marks the increasing convergence of cyberculture with other forms of media, and with all aspects of our lives in a digitized world.
  • Includes essential readings for both the student and scholar of a diverse range of fields, including new and digital media, internet studies, digital arts and culture studies, network culture studies, and the information society
  • Incorporates essays by both new and established scholars of digital cultures, including Andy Miah, Eugene Thacker, Lisa Nakamura, Chris Hables Gray, Sonia Livingstone and Espen Aarseth
  • Created explicitly for the undergraduate student, with comprehensive introductions to each section that outline the main ideas of each essay
  • Explores the many facets of cyberculture, and includes sections on race, politics, gender, theory, gaming, and space
  • The perfect companion to Nayar's Introduction to New Media and Cyberculture
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Preface.

Acknowledgments.

Acknowledgments to Sources.

Introduction.

PART ONE: THEORIES, POETICS, PRACTICES.

1 Web Sphere Analysis and Cybercultural Studies (Kirsten Foot).

2 What Does it Mean to be Posthuman? (N. Katherine Hayles).

3 Digitextuality and Click Theory: Theses on Convergence Media in the Digital Age (Anna Everett).

4 The Double Logic of Remediation (Jay David Bolter and Richard Grusin).

5 The Database (Lev Manovich).

6 Making Meaning of Mobiles: A Theory of Apparatgeist (James E. Katz and Mark A. Aakhus).

PART TWO: SPACE, PLACE, COMMUNITY.

7 Post-Sedentary Space (William J. Mitchell).

8 The End of Geography or the Explosion of Place?: Conceptualizing Space, Place and Information Technology (Stephen Graham).

9 Asphalt Games: Enacting Place Through Locative Media (Michele Chang and Elizabeth Goodman).

10 Thought on the Convergence of Digital Media, Memory, and Social and Urban Spaces (Federico Casalegno).

PART THREE: RACE IN/AND CYBERSPACE.

11 Cybertyping and the Work of Race in the Age of Digital Reproduction (Lisa Nakamura).

12 Thinking Through the Diaspora: Call Centers, India, and a New Politics of Hybridity (Raka Shome).

13 Voices of the Marginalized on the Internet: Examples from a Website for Women of South Asia (Ananda Mitra).

PART FOUR: BODIES, EMBODIMENT, BIOPOLITICS.

14 Hypes, Hopes and Actualities: New Digital Cartesianism and Bodies in Cyberspace (Megan Boler).

15 The Bioethics of Cybermedicalization (Andy Miah and Emma Rich).

16 Biocolonialism, Genomics, and the Databasing of the Population (Eugene Thacker).

PART FIVE: GENDER, SEX, AND SEXUALITIES.

17 Assembling Bodies in Cyberspace: Technologies, Bodies, and Sexual Difference (Dianne Currier).

18 Lesbians in (Cyber)space: The Politics of the Internet in Latin American On- and Off-line Communities (Elisabeth Jay Friedman).

19 E-Rogenous Zones: Positioning Pornography in the Digital Economy (Blaise Cronin and Elisabeth Davenport).

20 Race, Gender and Sex on the Net: Semantic Networks of Selling and Storytelling Sex Tourism (Peter A. Chow-White).

PART SIX: POLITICS, POLITICAL ACTION, ACTIVISM.

21 Internet Studies in Times of Terror (David Silver and Alice Marwick).

22 Free Labor: Producing Culture for the Digital Economy (Tiziana Terranova).

23 Ensuring Minority Rights in a Pluralistic and "Liquid" Information Society (Birgitte Kofod Olsen).

24 Hacktivism: All Together in the Virtual (Tim Jordan).

PART SEVEN: GAMES, GAMING, META-UNIVERSES.

25 Games Telling Stories: A Brief Note on Games and Narratives (Jesper Juul).

26 WoW is the New MUD: Social Gaming from Text to Video (Torill Elvira Mortensen).

27 Women and Games: Technologies of the Gendered Self (Pam Royse, Joon Lee, Baasanjav Undrahbuyan, Mark Hopson, and Mia Consalvo).

28 To the White Extreme: Conquering Athletic Space, White Manhood, and Racing Virtual Reality (David J. Leonard).

29 Your Second Life?: Goodwill and the Performativity of Intellectual Property in Online Digital Gaming (Andrew Herman, Rosemary J. Coombe, and Lewis Kaye).

PART EIGHT: THE DIGITAL, THE MOBILE, THE PERSONAL, AND THE EVERYDAY.

30 Taking Risky Opportunities in Youthful Content Creation: Teenagers' Use of Social Networking Sites for Intimacy, Privacy and Self-expression (Sonia Livingstone).

31 Dynamics of Internet Dating (Helene M. Lawson and Kira Leck).

32 Screening Moments, Scrolling Lives: Diary Writing on the Web (Madeleine Sorapure).

33 Your Life in Snapshots: Mobile Weblogs (Nicola Döring and Axel Gundolf).

34 Assembling Portable Talk and Mobile Worlds: Sound Technologies and Mobile Social Networks (John Farnsworth and Terry Austrin).

35 New Media, Networking and Phatic Culture (Vincent Miller).

Index.

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Pramod K. Nayar teaches in the Department of English at the University of Hyderabad, India. His most recent books include Virtual Worlds: Culture and Politics in the Age of Cybertechnology (2004), Reading Culture: Theory, Praxis, Politics (2006), An Introduction to Cultural Studies (2008), Seeing Stars: Spectacle, Society and Celebrity Culture (2009), Packaging Life: Cultures of the Everyday (2009) , and An Introduction to New Media and Cybercultures (Wiley-Blackwell, 2010).
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  • Includes essential readings for both the student and scholar of a diverse range of fields, including new and digital media, Internet studies, digital arts and culture studies, network culture studies, and the information society
  • Incorporates essays by both new and established scholars of digital cultures, including Andy Miah, Eugene Thacker, Lisa Nakamura, Chris Hables Gray, Sonia Livingstone and Espen Aarseth
  • Created explicitly for the undergraduate student, with comprehensive introductions to each section that outline the main ideas of each essay
  • Explores the many facets of cyberculture, and includes sections on race, politics, gender, theory, gaming, and space
  • The perfect companion to Nayar's Introduction to New Media and Cyberculture
See More
"Recommended. Lower-and-upper division undergraduates; general readers." (Choice , 1 April 2011)

"This collection is a timely, thought-provoking reflection on the social and cultural impacts of cyberspace and new media. I highly recommend it to scholars, teachers, students and indeed all those interested in new media and cyberculture." (M/C Reviews, September 11, 2010)

"Underscoring the larger socio-political, economic and cultural contexts of digital and new media cultures, this refreshingly diverse and interdisciplinary collection of scholarship offers a significant and timely contribution to the field of cyberculture studies."
Kristin Scott, George Mason University

"What are cybercultures? Today, this question can only be asked and answered in the plural. The New Media and Cybercultures Anthology gives us a broad and well-nigh definitive sampling of reflections on how new technologies have changed our lives."
Steven Shaviro, author of Connected, Or, What It Means To Live in the Network Society

"It is obvious that screens, and what happens on them, are only part of the story of new media in the early 21st century. These texts, ambitiously brought together by Pramod K. Nayar, provide some significant signposts for grasping the networks of flesh, fiber and affect operating inside, outside and beyond the screen."
Ryan Griffis, University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign

"This collection gathers together interesting and important essays which enable its readers to usefully and sensibly approach to the studies of new media and cyberculture."
Terri He, Kaohsiung Medical University and National University of Kaohsiung, Taiwan

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