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Construction Safety Management

ISBN: 978-1-4051-8660-5
216 pages
December 2008, Wiley-Blackwell
Construction Safety Management (1405186607) cover image

Description

Additional resources to accompany the book are available at: http://www.blackwellpublishing.com/howarth/

The construction industry is a global, dynamic and innovative industry that delivers buildings and infrastructure for all aspects of commercial and domestic activity.

This dynamic and innovative industry is faced with safety challenges on a project by project and day to day basis. Excellence in Health and safety management is therefore a key requirement of construction industry professional practice, and as such its study is a necessary and core component of a wide range of built environment undergraduate degree programmes, either as a distinct discipline or as an embedded component.


Construction Safety Management is an accessible, up-to-date text that outlines the principles and practices of construction health and safety management. It is written to support the study of health and safety on professionally accredited undergraduate built environment degree programmes. The text introduces and informs the reader of issues, concepts, legislation and practice pertinent to the sound development of knowledge and practice requisite for effective construction health and safety management.


Students on courses ranging from Architecture, Architectural Technology, Building Engineering, Civil Engineering, Construction Management, Project Management and Quantity Surveying will find that each chapter presents clear learning objectives, addresses key issues and concepts and provides for self-assessment of learning.

Additional resources to accompany the book are available at: http://www.blackwellpublishing.com/howarth/

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Table of Contents

Introduction: Health and Safety – Overriding Principles.

Chapter 1 The Safety Performance of the UK Construction Industry.

This chapter introduces and reviews the safety performance record of the UK construction industry. The Egan report ‘Rethinking Construction’ (DETR, 1998) stated that ‘the health and safety record of construction is the second worst of any industry’ and that ‘accidents can account for 4 to 6 per cent of total project costs’. This chapter presents an evaluation of the UK construction Industry’s safety performance statistics and enables the reader to meaningfully consider Egan’s statement.

Learning Objectives of the Chapter.

Introduction to the Chapter.

Reporting and Recording accidents - the HSC and the HSE.

Standardisation of accident statistics.

UK Construction Industry Safety Statistics.

Campaign to Revitalise Health and Safety in the UK Construction Industry.

The impact of ‘RIDDOR’ upon the recording of health and safety performance statistics.

Chapter Summary.

Self Assessment Questions.

Chapter 2 The Legal Framework and Enforcement of Construction Health and Safety.

This chapter outlines the framework of UK construction health and safety law and its enforcement. It presents an overview of the hierarchy of UK construction health and safety requirements, identifies the categories of duty imposed by UK health and safety law, introduces the institutions and actions of health and safety enforcement, addresses when a prosecution might be pursued and considers the burden of proof of prosecution and possible resultant penalties.

Learning Objectives of the Chapter.

Introduction to the Chapter.

European Union Law.

Statutory Law.

Statutory Instruments.

Approved Codes of Practice.

Complying with Health and Safety Law – Fulfilling Duties.

Enforcement of the Health and Safety within the UK.

The Enforcement Process.

Chapter Summary.

Self Assessment Questions.

Chapter 3 UK Construction Health and Safety Law.

The Health and Safety law of the UK construction industry is, like all UK industries, built upon The Health and Safety at Work Act, etc 1974. This Act provides the basis for UK health and safety law and is further supported by sets of ‘regulations’. Together the Act and regulations make for a comprehensive and cohesive framework of UK construction health and safety law. This chapter presents detail of the Health and Safety at Work Act, etc 1974 and key UK construction health and safety regulations. Completion of the chapter provides the reader with a secure foundation of knowledge regarding the framework of UK construction health and safety law.

Learning Objectives of the Chapter.

Introduction to the Chapter.

Key Duties Imposed by the Health and Safety at Work Act, etc 1974.

Health and Safety Regulations.

Time Line of Key UK Construction Health and Safety Legislation.

Use of approved codes of practice in criminal proceedings.

The Fulfilment of Key Duties imposed by Health and Safety Law.

Chapter summary.

Self Assessment Questions.

Chapter 4 The Construction (Design and Management) Regulations 2007.

The Construction (Design and Management) Regulations 2007 (CDM2007) place health and safety management duties on all parties to a construction project. The Regulations promote effective project communication and co-ordination and require the assessment and demonstration of competence. A new role is created by the Regulations, that of the CDM co-ordinator. This role replaces that of the previous ‘planning supervisor’. In further support of effective health and safety management the Regulations require the production of ‘pre-construction information’ by the client and a ‘construction phase plan’ by the principal contractor.

Learning Objectives of the Chapter.

Introduction to the Chapter.

Definitions Provided within the Regulations.

Application of the Regulations.

The Structure and Content of the Regulations.

The requirement for welfare facilities on construction projects.

The safety management duties and responsibilities imposed on parties to a construction project by CDM2007.

Delivering Notifiable Construction Projects.

Further information on CDM2007.

Chapter Summary.

Self Assessment Questions.

Chapter 5 Key Site Health and Safety Hazards and Control Measures.

A safe site requires the effective planning of work operations, the control of hazards and hazardous activities, and project personnel with technical competence, professional conduct and positive attitudes towards safety. This chapter serves to raise awareness and understanding of the nature of safety hazards commonly encountered on construction projects. A ‘register’ of common hazards is presented which arranges hazards into 5 key categories. The register facilitates awareness of the typology of construction safety hazards and associated control measures of good safety management practice.

Learning Objectives of the Chapter.

Introduction to the Chapter.

Definition of a safety hazard.

Definition of ‘risk’ (in a safety context).

Identifying Hazards.

A ‘Register’ of Common Site Safety Hazards.

Chapter Summary.

Self Assessment Questions.

.

Chapter 6 Principles and Practice of Health and Safety Risk Assessment.

Risk assessment is a fundamental component of health and safety management methodology. It is essential for construction managers to be fully conversant with the principles and practice of risk assessment. The chapter identifies the legal basis for the requirement of health and safety risk assessment in the UK construction industry. Further to this, the chapter outlines a methodology for the carrying out of health and safety risk assessments and presents worked examples.

Learning Objectives of the Chapter.

Introduction to the Chapter.

Duty to Carry Out Risk Assessments.

Undertaking Risk Assessment.

Hazard Identification.

Evaluation of Risk.

Prevention and Protective Measures.

Chapter summary.

Self Assessment Questions.

.

Chapter 7 Managing for Health and Wellbeing.

It is essential that construction industry employers develop, implement and review arrangements for the successful management of occupational ill health. This chapter considers the need for and practice of occupational health management within construction projects. Outline examples of reportable illnesses and diseases are presented and a statistical evidence of illness and disease within the construction industry is highlighted. Key ‘at risk’ groups are tabulated and an exemplar model for managing occupational health in construction projects is outlined.

Learning Objectives of the Chapter.

Introduction to Occupational Health Management.

Examples of Reportable ill Health.

The Statistical Evidence Base for Health and Wellbeing Management in Construction Projects.

HSE Goals for Occupational Health.

Exemplar Model for Managing Occupational Health.

A Toolkit for Occupational Health Management.

Chapter Summary.

Self Assessment Questions.

Chapter 8 The (Principal) Contractor’s Health and Safety Management System.

The management of health and safety is an essential operational requirement of commercial organisations. Regardless of industry, it is vital that organisations and their projects and activities are operated with due respect to the systematic management of health and safety.

This chapter considers key components of a principal contractor’s health and safety management system. These components are identified as ‘policy, organising, planning and implementing, measuring, reviewing and auditing’. Practical examples are provided throughout to illustrate the constituent components of the principal contractor’s health and safety management system.

Learning Objectives of the Chapter.

Introduction to the Chapter.

The Essential Elements of a Successful Health and Safety Management System.

The HSE’s key elements of successful health and safety management.

The Principal Contractor’s Health and Safety Management System.

Organising for Health and Safety.

Chapter Summary.

Self Assessment Questions.

Chapter 9 Promoting a Positive Health and Safety Culture.

This chapter is concerned with the culture of health and safety within construction organisations. It considers the concept and definition of safety culture and addresses aspects pertinent to the development of a positive heath and safety culture within construction organisations and projects.

Constituent components and three stages of safety culture development are outlined. Practical initiatives and tools for promoting a positive safety culture are highlighted and include: industry campaigns to raise awareness; competency assessment; worker engagement; and education, training and induction activities. Finally, both actions and the management process necessary to address safety culture continuous improvement are outlined.

Learning Objectives of the Chapter.

Introduction to the Chapter.

Defining Safety Culture.

Initiatives and Management Tools for Promoting a Positive Safety Culture.

The use of safety culture indicators – to enhance monitoring and evaluation.

Taking Action to Improving Safety Culture.

Chapter Summary.

Self Assessment Questions

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Author Information

Tim Howarth is a Principal Lecturer and Director of Student Affairs in the School of the Built Environment at Northumbria University.

Paul Watson is Professor and Head of Construction, Cost and Surveying in the Faculty of Development and Society at Sheffield Hallam University. He has authored and co-authored 146 papers and six text books related to construction and construction education.

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The Wiley Advantage


  • an accessible, up-to-date text that outlines the principles and practices of construction health and safety management

  • each chapter presents clear learning objectives, addresses key issues and concepts and provides questions for self-assessment of learning

  • written to support the study of health and safety on professionally accredited undergraduate built environment degree programmes
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Reviews

“Notwithstanding this, the book presents a very helpful ‘one-stop-shop’ for construction OHS information relevant to the UK. It presents good value and would be a very useful prescribed textbook for UK-based undergraduate courses for the built environment professions.”  (Construction Management and Economics, 1 February 2010)

"[Howarth and Watson] are in prime position to write an authorative and comprehensive book with the express purpose of supporting the study of health and safety on professionally accredited undergraduate built environment degree programmes. And they succeed in this aim admirably." (RoSPA Occupational Safety & Health Bulletin, April 2009)

"This book … will stand the test of time¯it is a book that the owner would refer to frequently and richly deserves its place on your book shelf at home or in the office and certainly should be in the library of colleges." (Building Engineer, February 2009)

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Related Websites / Extra

Howarth Resources PageAdditional resources from the authors including presentation slides and questions and answers.
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Downloads

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Presentation Slides 330.50 KB Click to Download
Presentation Slides: Introduction 18.75 KB Click to Download
Questions and Answers 91.02 KB Click to Download
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