Thank you for visiting us. We are currently updating our shopping cart and regret to advise that it will be unavailable until September 1, 2014. We apologise for any inconvenience and look forward to serving you again.

Wiley
Wiley.com
Print this page Share

The House of Lords in the Age of George III (1760-1811)

ISBN: 978-1-4051-9225-5
488 pages
October 2009, Wiley-Blackwell
The House of Lords in the Age of George III (1760-1811)  (1405192259) cover image
A full and comprehensive assessment of the place of the 18th-century peerage and House of Lords.
  • Uses statistical and anecdotal evidence to create a variegated portrait of the nobility, its political outlook, and the ways in which the nobility’s multifarious roles combined to shape its members’ conduct as peers of parliament
  • Challenges the assumption that the Lords remained a creature of the crown and demonstrates that peers and bishops were useful, informed, and broadly connected legislators
  • Incorporates the results of recent research on the role of ideology in 18th-century British politics and the legislative business of parliaments
  • Draws on contemporary newspapers and journals and over 120 manuscript collections, some not previously consulted by students of the House
  • Offers new insights into the Lords’ changing relations with the crown and the Commons, traces the metamorphosis of the ‘party of the crown’ into an ultra-tory connection, and demonstrates that even as it resisted some political and social reform, the Lords was a useful legislative chamber that adapted effectively to the rising volume of business
See More
Acknowledgments.

Note on Titles.

Abbreviations.

Introduction.  

The Membership.

1. The Peerage, 1760–1811: A Group Portrait.

2. The Representative Peers of Scotland and Ireland.

3. The Bishops.

4. Attendance and Participation.

Politics.

5. Political Connections: An Overview.

6. The House of Lords and Politics at Westminster, 1761–80.

7. The Lords, the Coalition and the India Bill, 1780–4.

8. Factions and Parties, 1784–1811.

9. The King and the ‘Party of the Crown’, 1784–1811.

10. Political Leadership, 1784–1811.

11. Public Opinion and Public Pressure, 1784–1811.  

Legislation.

12. Lords and Commons (1): Partners in Legislation.

13. Lords and Commons (2): MPs and their Patrons.

14. Lords and Commons (3): Procedure, Leadership and Inquiry.

15. Interest Groups.

16. ‘Virtual Representation’ and the House of Lords.

Epilogue.

Appendices.

Bibliography.

Index.

See More
Michael W. McCahill did his undergraduate and graduate work at Harvard University where he received his Ph.D. in 1970. After six years at the University of Massachusetts in Boston, he taught history and held a variety of administrative posts at Brooks School. He has published an earlier book on the House of Lords and a number of articles.
See More
  • A full and comprehensive assessment of the place of the 18th-century peerage and House of Lords
  • Uses statistical and anecdotal evidence to create a variegated portrait of the nobility, its political outlook, and the ways in which the nobility’s multifarious roles combined to shape its members’ conduct as peers of parliament
  • Challenges the assumption that the Lords remained a creature of the crown and demonstrates that peers and bishops were useful, informed, and broadly connected legislators
  • Incorporates the results of recent research on the role of ideology in 18th-century British politics and the legislative business of parliaments
  • Draws on contemporary newspapers and journals and over 120 manuscript collections, some not previously consulted by students of the House
  • Offers new insights into the Lords’ changing relations with the crown and the Commons, traces the metamorphosis of the ‘party of the crown’ into an ultra-tory connection, and demonstrates that even as it resisted some political and social reform, the Lords was a useful legislative chamber that adapted effectively to the rising volume of business
See More
"McCahill's painstaking research and careful scholarship combine to make this book an indispensable study of the aristocracy during the reign of George III, particularly in its parliamentary role." (The Journal of Interdisciplinary History, 9 February 2011)

"But, for those wishing to gather information about the constituency and workings of the Lords and its political outlook, this is a seminal work." (EHR, 1 April 2011)

See More
Back to Top