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Teaching Psychology in Higher Education

Dominic Upton (Editor), Annie Trapp (Editor)
ISBN: 978-1-4051-9549-2
328 pages
March 2010, Wiley-Blackwell
Teaching Psychology in Higher Education (1405195495) cover image
This ground-breaking book is the first to address the learning and teaching issues associated with psychology in Higher Education in the UK and Europe
  • Presents effective, evidence-based practice and advice for both experienced and new lecturers
  • Covers challenging areas of psychology teaching, such as research methods and statistics, supervision of research projects and management of online learning
  • Relevant for European Universities aligning with the Bologna Declaration
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Notes on Contributors.

Foreword (Stephen E. Newstead, University of Plymouth).

Preface (Dominic Upton, University of Worcester and Annie Trapp, Higher Education Academy Psychology Network).

Acknowledgements.

1. Individual Differences: Psychology in the European Community (Annie Trapp, Higher Education Academy Psychology Network and Dominic Upton, University of Worcester).

2. Those We Serve? Student Issues and Solutions (Caprice Lantz, Centre of Lifelong Learning, University of York).

3. Myths, Maths and Madness: Misconceptions around Psychology (Peter Reddy, Aston University and Caprice Lantz, Centre of Lifelong Learning, University of York).

4. Teaching You to Suck Eggs? Using Psychology to Teach Psychology (Annie Trapp, Higher Education Academy Psychology Network).

5. Bravery and Creativity through the Curriculum (Douglas A. Bernstein, National Institute on the Teaching of Psychology and Dominic Upton, University of Worcester).

6. Non-Sadistical Methods for Teaching Statistics (Andy P. Field, University of Sussex).

7. Where Angels Fear to Tread: The Undergraduate Research Project (Mark Forshaw, Staffordshire University and Susan Hansen, Middlesex University).

8. How Do You Really Know? (Kathy Harrington, Write Now Centre for Excellence in Teaching and Learning, London Metropolitan University).

9. Onwards and Upwards: Teaching Postgraduate Students (Jacqui Akhurst, York St John University, York).

10. Spreading the Word: Teaching Psychology to Non-Psychologists (Dominic Upton, University of Worcester).

11. Psychology: Past, Present and Future (Dominic Upton, University of Worcester and Annie Trapp, Higher Education Academy Psychology Network).

Resource Guide.

Index.

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Dominic Upton is Head of Psychological Sciences at the University of Worcester. He is a Chartered Health Psychologist and teaches psychology to psychologists and those in other professions. In addition to a number of academic articles in professional journals, he has written text books for psychologists along with nurses, podiatrists and other allied health care professionals. In 2007 he was awarded a National Teaching Fellowship for his role in exploring and developing the teaching of psychology.

Annie Trapp is Director of the Higher Education Academy Psychology Network and a founding member of EUROPLAT, a European network to support psychology education. In addition to editing the journal Psychology Learning and Teaching, she has written a number of book chapters and articles relating to psychology education and presented workshops on psychology education across the world.

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  • The first book to address the learning and teaching issues associated with Psychology in Higher Education
  • Presents effective, evidence-based practice and advice for both experienced and new lecturers
  • Covers challenging areas of Psychology teaching, such as research methods and statistics, supervision of research projects and management of online learning
  • Relevant for European Universities aligning with the Bologna Declaration
See More
"The breadth of coverage in Upton and Trapp's volume is considerable, and the quality of information in each chapter is high...The tone of the book is always positive and energetic, as one would expect from a rally-cry. Read it, and join the cause." (PLAT journal, December 2010)

"Dominic Upton and Annie Trapp have put together a useful guide to teaching psychology in higher education. It includes standard topics such as how to teach statistics and supervise research projects, and novel topics, such as using psychology to teach psychology and designing a creative curriculum.

"Readers will learn about the psychology major in the European Union, how the educational process is being shaped by international agreements, and other topics that have no geographical boundaries, such as teaching graduate students and understanding the diversity of students we serve. Both new teachers and seasoned ones will gain in their understanding of the enterprise we call ‘teaching psychology’, and find helpful ideas to make them more effective instructors who can teach in ways that make learning last."
Diane F. Halpern, Trustee Professor of Psychology and Roberts Fellow, Claremont McKenna College, USA

· "This book is edited and written by some of the leading practitioners of the area who are, and have been, closely involved in encouraging the development of psychology teaching and learning in Higher Education; both for those currently teaching in institutions, and for their students. The authors have been actively engaged in the debates, and have a wide perspective to offer.

"This should be essential reading for all those who are currently engaged in teaching psychology in higher education. It is not a ‘how to do it’ book; it has a thoughtful and informed basis, which is thought-provoking for the reader and useful as a source book of ideas and suggestions. It is to indicate what we need to be alerted to, what we need to know, what we may need to think about in a time of rapid change in Higher Education, where we should be very aware of contemporary debates.

"I would recommend that all those concerned with improving our Psychology degrees should be using this source book of ideas, recent developments, useful contacts, helpful suggestions and references."
Peter Banister, Head of Psychology, The Manchester Metropolitan University, UK

· "This is a valuable handbook for those teaching psychology in higher education. It is full of useful information and helpful ideas to enhance the way we do things."
Richard Latto, Chair, Psychology Education Board of the British Psychological Society

· "This volume covers topics relevant to psychology educators, ranging from practice-oriented advice on how to effectively teach research methods and statistics, to the impact of the Bologna process and the future of psychology education and training. Most chapters begin with a listing of topics to be covered, and end with a listing of key issues and research questions, all of which make the material more accessible, relevant, and credible. This volume is likely to become an indispensable handbook for tertiary psychology educators who are genuinely interested in improving student learning outcomes."
Jacquelyn Cranney, University of New South Wales, Australia

Teaching Psychology in Higher Education provides an up-to-date summary of the literature in a rapidly developing area of interest. It will be a very useful source for psychology academics interested in improving their teaching, and their students’ learning. It represents an excellent starting point for a deeper scholarly enquiry in a wide variety of topic areas.’
Dr Stephen Provost, Southern Cross University, Australia

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