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A Companion to Persius and Juvenal

Susanna Braund (Editor), Josiah Osgood (Editor)
ISBN: 978-1-4051-9965-0
628 pages
October 2012, Wiley-Blackwell
A Companion to Persius and Juvenal (1405199652) cover image
A Companion to Persius and Juvenal breaks new ground in its in-depth focus on both authors as "satiric successors"; detailed individual contributions suggest original perspectives on their work, and provide an in-depth exploration of Persius' and Juvenal's afterlives.
  • Provides detailed and up-to-date guidance on the texts and contexts of Persius and Juvenal
  • Offers substantial discussion of the reception of both authors, reflecting some of the most innovative work being done in contemporary Classics
  • Contains a thorough exploration of Persius' and Juvenal's afterlives
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List of Illustrations viii

Abbreviations ix

Notes on Contributors x

Acknowledgments xv

Introduction: Persius and Juvenal as Satiric Successors 1
Josiah Osgood

PART I Persius and Juvenal: Texts and Contexts 17

1 Satire in the Republic: From Lucilius to Horace 19
Ralph M. Rosen

2 The Life and Times of Persius: The Neronian Literary “Renaissance” 41
Martin T. Dinter

3 Juvenalis Eques: A Dissident Voice from the Lower Tier of the Roman Elite 59
David Armstrong

4 Life in the Text: The Corpus of Persius’ Satires 79
Catherine Keane

5 Juvenal: The Idea of the Book 97
Barbara K. Gold

6 Satiric Textures: Style, Meter, and Rhetoric 113
E.J. Kenney

7 Manuscripts of Juvenal and Persius 137
Holt. N. Parker

PART II Retrospectives: Persius and Juvenal as Successors 163

8 Venusina lucerna: Horace, Callimachus, and Imperial Satire 165
Andrea Cucchiarelli

9 Self-Representation and Performativity 190
Paul Roche

10 Persius, Juvenal, and Stoicism 217
Shadi Bartsch

11 Persius, Juvenal, and Literary History after Horace 239
Charles McNelis

12 Imperial Satire and Rhetoric 262
Christopher S. van den Berg

13 Politics and Invective in Persius and Juvenal 283
Matthew Roller

14 Imperial Satire as Saturnalia 312
Paul Allen Miller

PART III Prospectives: The Successors of Persius and Juvenal 335

15 Imperial Satire Reiterated: Late Antiquity through the Twentieth Century 337
Dan Hooley

16 Persius, Juvenal, and the Transformation of Satire in Late Antiquity 363
Cristiana Sogno

17 Imperial Satire in the English Renaissance 386
Stuart Gillespie

18 Imperial Satire Theorized: Dryden’s Discourse of Satire 409
Josiah Osgood and Susanna Braund

19 Imperial Satire and the Scholars 436
Holt N. Parker and Susanna Braund

20 School Texts of Persius and Juvenal 465
Amy Richlin

21 Revoicing Imperial Satire 486
Gideon Nisbet

22 Persius and Juvenal in the Media Age 513
Martin M. Winkler

References 545

Index Locorum 587

General Index 603

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Susanna Braund is Professor of Latin Poetry and its Reception at the University of British Columbia. She is the author of Latin Literature (2002), a major edition of Seneca’s De Clementia (2009), and translator of A Lucan Reader. Selections from Civil War (2009).

Josiah Osgood is Professor of Classics at Georgetown University. He is author of Caesar’s Legacy: Civil War and the Emergence of the Roman Empire (2006), Claudius Caesar: Image and Power in the Early Roman Empire (2011), and A Suetonius Reader (2011).
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“Braund and Osgood's A Companion to Persius and Juvenalis an excellent book.  Specialists, non-specialists, and students alike will find in this volume a comprehensive and spacious approach to these challenging poets.”  (Phoenix, 1 May 2014)

“The whole book can be recommended, but I will single out a few chapters as especially interesting. . . In general, this is a useful book and a good first port-of-call for those new to the subjects.”  (Religious Studies Review, 1 December 2013)

“This dense volume makes a stimulating contribution to the study of imperial Latin satire.”  (Bryn Mawr Classical Review, 1 October 2013)

“Graced with a 40-page bibliography, this 600-page work should become indispensable to classical scholars and anyone interested in satire. Summing Up: Essential. Upper-level undergraduates and above.”  (Choice, 1 July 2013)

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