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A Companion to Roman Religion

Jörg Rüpke (Editor)
ISBN: 978-1-4443-3924-6
572 pages
April 2011, Wiley-Blackwell
A Companion to Roman Religion (1444339249) cover image
A comprehensive treatment of the significant symbols and institutions of Roman religion, this companion places the various religious symbols, discourses, and practices, including Judaism and Christianity, into a larger framework to reveal the sprawling landscape of the Roman religion.
  • An innovative introduction to Roman religion
  • Approaches the field with a focus on the human-figures instead of the gods
  • Analyzes religious changes from the eighth century BC to the fourth century AD
  • Offers the first history of religious motifs on coins and household/everyday utensils
  • Presents Roman religion within its cultural, social, and historical contexts
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List of Figures.

List of Maps.

Notes on Contributors.

Acknowledgments.

Abbreviations.

Maps.

1. Roman Religion – Religions of Rome (Jörg Rüpke).

2. Approaching Roman Religion: The Case for Wissenschaftsgeschichte (C. Robert Phillips, III).

Part I: Changes:

3. The Religion of Archaic Rome (Christopher Smith).

4. Pre-Roman Italy, Before and Under the Romans (Olivier de Cazanove).

5. Urban Religion in the Middle and Late Republic (Eric Orlin).

6. Continuity and Change: Religion in the Augustan Semi-Century (Karl Galinsky).

7. Religions and the Integration of Cities in the Empire in the Second Century ad: The Creation of a Common Religious Language (William Van Andringa).

8. Old Religions Transformed: Religions and Religious Policy from Decius to Constantine (Hartmut Leppin).

9. Religious Koine and Religious Dissent in the Fourth Century (Michele Renee Salzman).

Part II: Media:

10. The History of Roman Religion in Roman Historiography and Epic (Denis Feeney).

11. Religion and Roman Coins (Jonathan Williams).

12. Reliefs, Public and Private (Katja Moede).

13. Inscriptions as Sources of Knowledge for Religions and Cults in the Roman World of Imperial Times (Rudolf Haensch).

14. Religion in the House (Annemarie Kaufmann-Heinimann).

Part III: Symbols and Practices:

15. Roman Cult Sites: A Pragmatic Approach (Ulrike Egelhaaf-Gaiser).

16. Complex Rituals: Games and Processions in Republican Rome (Frank Bernstein).

17. Performing the Sacred: Prayers and Hymns (Frances Hickson Hahn).

18. Music and Dance: Forms of Representation in Pictorial and Written Sources (Friederike Fless and Katja Moede).

19. Sacrifices for Gods and Ancestors (John Scheid).

Part IV: Actors and Actions:

20. Religious Actors in Daily Life: Practices and Related Beliefs (Nicole Belayche).

21. Republican Nobiles: Controlling the Res Publica (Veit Rosenberger).

22. Emperors: Caring for the Empire and Their Successors (Peter Herz).

23. Urban Elites in the Roman East: Enhancing Regional Positions and Social Superiority (Athanasios Rizakis).

24. Living on Religion: Professionals and Personnel (Marietta Horster).

Part V: Different Religious Identities:

25. Roman Diaspora Judaism (Jack N. Lightstone).

26. Creating One's Own Religion: Intellectual Choices (Attilio Mastrocinque).

27. Institutionalized Religious Options: Mithraism (Richard Gordon).

28. The Romanness of Roman Christianity (Stefan Heid).

Part VI: Roman Religion Outside and Seen from Outside:

29. Exporting Roman Religion (Clifford Ando).

30. Religion in the Roman East (Ted Kaizer).

31. Roman Religion in the Vision of Tertullian (Cecilia Ames).

Bibliography.

General Index.

Index of Personal Names.

Index of Places.

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Jörg Rüpke is Chair of Comparative Religion at the University of Erfurt and coordinator of the Priority Program of the Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft 1080 "Roman imperial and provincial religion". His recent books include Religion of the Romans (2001), Rituals in Ink (2004), Fasti Sacerdotum (2005), Religion and Law, ed. with Clifford Ando, (2006), Zeit und Fest (2006), and Religions Orientales (2006).
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  • An innovative introduction to Roman religion
  • Approaches the field with a focus on the human-figures instead of the gods
  • Analyzes religious changes from the eighth century BC to the fourth century AD
  • Offers the first history of religious motifs on coins and household/everyday utensils
  • Presents Roman religion within its cultural, social, and historical contexts
See More
"This Companion will in fact be sustaining company as we try to read these signs to find the meaning that compelled such commitment." (Phoenix, 2011)

 

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