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A Handbook to the Reception of Ovid

ISBN: 978-1-4443-3967-3
520 pages
September 2014, Wiley-Blackwell
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Description

A Handbook to the Reception of Ovid presents more than 30 original essays written by leading scholars revealing the rich diversity of critical engagement with Ovid’s poetry that spans the Western tradition from antiquity to the present day. 

  • Offers innovative perspectives on Ovid’s poetry and its reception from antiquity to the present day
  • Features contributions from more than 30 leading scholars in the Humanities.
  • Introduces familiar and unfamiliar figures in the history of Ovidian reception.
  • Demonstrates the enduring and transformative power of Ovid’s poetry into modern times.
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Table of Contents

Illustrations ix

Notes on Contributors xi

Acknowledgments xvii

Introduction 1
Carole E. Newlands and John F. Miller

1 Ovid’s Self-Reception in His Exile Poetry 8
K. Sara Myers

2 Modeling Reception in Metamorphoses: Ovid’s Epic Cyclops 22
Andrew Feldherr

3 Ovidian Myths on PompeianWalls 36
Peter E. Knox

4 Ovid in Flavian Occasional Poetry (Martial and Statius) 55
Gianpiero Rosati

5 Poetae Ovidiani: Ovid’s Metamorphoses in Imperial Roman Epic 70
Alison Keith

6 Ovid in Apuleius’ Metamorphoses 86
Stephen Harrison

7 A Poet between TwoWorlds: Ovid in Late Antiquity 100
Ian Fielding

8 Commentary and Collaboration in the Medieval Allegorical Tradition 114
Jamie C. Fumo

9 The Mythographic Tradition after Ovid 129
Gregory Hays

10 Ovid’s Exile and Medieval Italian Literature: The Lyric Tradition 144
Catherine Keen

11 Venus’s Clerk: Ovid’s Amatory Poetry in the Middle Ages 161
Marilynn Desmond

12 The Metamorphosis of Ovid in Dante’s Divine Comedy 174
Diskin Clay

13 Ovid in Chaucer and Gower 187
Andrew Galloway

14 Ovid’s Metamorphoses and the History of Baroque Art 202
Paul Barolsky

15 The Poetics of Time: The Fasti in the Renaissance 217
Maggie Kilgour

16 Shakespeare and Ovid 232
Sean Keilen

17 Ben Jonson’s Light Reading 246
Heather James

18 Love Poems in Sequence: The Amores from Petrarch to Goethe 262
Gordon Braden

19 Don Quixote as Ovidian Text 277
Frederick A. de Armas

20 Spenser and Ovid 291
Philip Hardie

21 Ovidian Intertextuality in Ariosto’s Orlando Furioso 306
Sergio Casali

22 “Joy and Harmles Pastime”: Milton and the Ovidian Arts of Leisure 324
Mandy Green

23 Ovid Translated: Early Modern Versions of the Metamorphoses 339
Dan Hooley

24 Ovid in Restoration and Eighteenth-Century England 355
James M. Horowitz

25 The Influence of Ovid in Opera 371
Jon Solomon

26 Ovid in Germany 386
Theodore Ziolkowski

27 Ovid and Russia’s Poets of Exile 401
Andrew Kahn

28 Alter-Ovid—Contemporary Art on the Hyphen 416
Jill H. Casid

29 Contemporary Poetry: After After Ovid 436
Sarah Annes Brown

30 Ovid’s “Biography”: Novels of Ovid’s Exile 454
Rainer Godel

31 Ovid and the Cinema: An Introduction 469
Martin M.Winkler

Index 485

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Author Information

John F. Miller is the Arthur F. and Marian W. Stocker Professor of Classics and Chair of the Department of Classics at the University of Virginia. His publications include Apollo, Augustus, and the Poets (2009) and Ovid’s Elegiac Festivals: Studies in the Fasti (1991).

Carole Newlands is Professor of Classics at the University of Colorado Boulder. Her publications include Statius: Poet between Rome and Naples (2012); Statius, Siluae 2, A Commentary (2011); Statius’ Siluae and the Poetics of Empire (2002); Playing with Time: Ovid and the Fasti (1995).

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Reviews

“The multi-authored Handbook to the Reception of Ovidis far more wide-ranging, and considers the whole field of Ovidian influence on literature, education, the visual arts, and film, from antiquity to the present day.” (Translation and Literature, 1 May 2015)

“While readers will also want to consult works by Doody (1985), Hopkins (2010), Oakley-Brown (2006) and Martindale (1988) — among many others, too numerous to list — this new Handbookis highly recommended as a scholarly introduction to the reception of Ovid.”  (Eighteenth-century Studies and Eighteenth-century Literature, 1 October 2014)

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