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Immigrants and Hosts: Perceptions, Interactions, and Transformations

ISBN: 978-1-4443-4999-3
300 pages
February 2011, Wiley-Blackwell
Immigrants and Hosts: Perceptions, Interactions, and Transformations (1444349996) cover image
This issue focuses on the contribution of psychological theory and research to facilitating successful immigration and integration. Coverage includes both sides of the equation-the attitudes and values of members of the host society as well as the motivations and experiences of immigrants themselves-and includes contributions from investigators on four continents.
  • The work presented in this issue covers four continents; countries include Australia, Canada, Chile, France, Germany, the Netherland, the United Kingdom and the United States; this geographical breadth is unusual in a single volume and should increase its readership base
  • Methods include experiments, questionnaires and surveys, interviews, longitudinal analyses, and meta-analytic techniques
  • Includes the perspectives of both immigrants and members of the host countries, as well as articles that look at the interchange between these two perspectives
  • Explicit consideration of policy is part of the coverage, represented in particular by the final article written by a Canadian immigration policy specialist
  • For all of those in the field of social psychology who personally knew or professional respected Kenneth Dion, this issue is dedicated to him and to the many contributions that he made to social psychology in general and to the study of immigration in particular
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SECTION I: A PSYCHOLOGY OF IMMIGRATION.

Psychological Perspectives on Immigration (Victoria M. Esses, Kay Deaux, Richard N. Lalonde, and Rupert Brown).

Understanding Immigrants’ Experiences: Reflections on Ken Dion’s Research Contributions (Karen Kisiel Dion).

SECTION II: THE HOST PERSPECTIVE.

Speaking Out on Immigration Policy in Australia: Identity Threat and the Interplay of Own Opinion and Public Opinion (Winnifred R. Louis, Julie M. Duck, Deborah J. Terry, and Richard N. Lalonde).

How Ideological Attitudes Predict Host Society Members’ Attitudes toward Immigrants: Exploring Cross-National Differences (J. Christopher Cohrs and Monika Stelzl).

Who We Are and Who Can Join Us: National Identity Content and Entry Criteria for New Immigrants (Samuel Pehrson and Eva G. T. Green).

SECTION III: THE IMMIGRANT PERSPECTIVE.

Migrating to Opportunities: How Family Migration Motivations Shape Academic Trajectories among Newcomer Immigrant Youth (Carolin Hagelskamp, Carola Suarez-Orozco, and Diane Hughes).

“To See Ourselves as Others See Us”: On the Implications of Reflected Appraisals for Ethnic Identity and Discrimination (Kimberly A. Noels, Peter A. Leavitt, and Richard Clement).

Political Mobilization of Dutch Muslims: Religious Identity Salience, Goal Framing, and Normative Constraints (Karen Phalet, Gulseli Baysu, and Maykel Verkuyten).

SECTION IV: COMBINING PERSPECTIVES.

Acculturation in Multiple Host Community Settings (Richard Y. Bourhis, Elisa Montaruli, Shaha El-Geledi, Simon-Pierre Harvey, and Genevieve Barrette).

Prejudice among Peruvians and Chileans as a Function of Identity, Intergroup Contact, Acculturation Preferences, and Intergroup Emotions (Roberto Gonzalez, David Sirlopu, and Thomas Kessler).

SECTION V: REFLECTIONS ON POLICY.

Psychological Research and Immigration Policy (Marc Wills).

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Kay Deaux is a Distinguished Professor Emerita at the Graduate Center of the City University of New York and a Research Affiliate in the Department of Psychology at New York University. Her research and writing focus on the social psychological aspects of immigration, including ethnic and bicultural identity, stereotypes and discrimination, and the relationship of these processes to outcomes such as academic performance and collective action.

Victoria Esses (Ph.D., University of Toronto) is Professor of Psychology and Director of the Centre for Research on Migration and Ethnic Relations at the University of Western Ontario. Her research examines prejudice, discrimination, and intergroup relations, with a particular interest in issues surrounding immigration and cultural diversity.

Richard N. Lalonde (Ph.D., University of Western Ontario) is Professor of Psychology  at York
University. His research interests lie at the intersection of identity, culture, and intergroup relations in
multicultural societies.

Rupert Brown is Professor of Psychology at the University of Sussex. His interests are broadly in group processes and intergroup relations, with a particular focus on social identity processes, intergroup emotions, and factors that promote more favorable intergroup attitudes.
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