Thank you for visiting us. We are currently updating our shopping cart and regret to advise that it will be unavailable until September 1, 2014. We apologise for any inconvenience and look forward to serving you again.

Wiley
Wiley.com
Print this page Share
E-book

Resistance, Space and Political Identities: The Making of Counter-Global Networks

ISBN: 978-1-4443-9939-4
240 pages
June 2011, Wiley-Blackwell
Resistance, Space and Political Identities: The Making of Counter-Global Networks (144439939X) cover image
Utilizing research on networked struggles in both the 18th-century Atlantic world and our modern day, Resistance, Space and Political Identities: The Making of Counter-Global Networks challenges existing understandings of the relations between space, politics, and resistance to develop an innovative account of networked forms of resistance and political activity.
  • Explores counter-global struggles in both the past and present—including both the 18th-century Atlantic world and contemporary forms of resistance
  • Examines the productive geographies of contestation
  • Foregrounds the solidarities and geographies of connection between different place-based struggles and argues that such solidarities are essential to produce more plural forms of globalization
See More
Series Editors’ Preface viii

Acknowledgements ix

Introduction: Space, Contestation and the Political 1

Part I Networking the Political 13

1 Place and the Relational Construction of Political Identities 15

2 Geographies of Solidarities and Antagonisms 36

Part II Geographies of Connection and Contestation 57

3 Labourers' Politics and Mercantile Networks 59

4 Making Democratic Spatial Practices 79

5 Counter-Global Networks and the Making of Subaltern Nationalisms 99

Part III Political Geographies of the Counter-Globalization Movement 119

6 Geographies of Power and the Counter-Globalization Movement 121

7 Constructing Transnational Political Networks 149

Conclusion: Towards Politicized Geographies of Connection 177

Notes 190

References 196

Index 221

See More
David Featherstone is a lecturer in Human Geography at the University of Liverpool. He has key research interests in space, politics and resistance and has published papers in several journals, including Society and Space, Antipode and Transactions of the Institute of British Geographers.
See More
  • Develops an innovative account of networked forms of resistance and political activity
  • Explores counter-global struggles in both the past and present—including both the 18th-century Atlantic world and contemporary forms of resistance
  • Examines the productive geographies of contestation
  • Foregrounds the solidarities and geographies of connection between different place-based struggles and argues that such solidarities are essential to produce more plural forms of globalization
See More
"This persuasive, important, and well-written book rethinks resistance to dominant forms of globalization by emphasizing the translocal, often transnational, character of subaltern protest ... Featherstone has produced a book as dexterous, creative, and wide-ranging as the political network it seeks to describe." (Environment and Planning D: Society and Space, 2010)

"This is a book that demands the attention and engagement of geographers, and others ‘inside' and ‘outside' academia, working on the intersections between social movements, political identities and the neoliberal state, ultimately offering a productive and uniquely positive approach to understanding and acting on the issues raised by such concerns." (Area, February 2011)

"Featherstone has produced a book as dexterous, creative, and wide-ranging as the political networks it seeks to describe." (Progress in Human Geography and Environment and Planning D, February 2011)

"This reviewer thinks we should be rather more generous - for, whatever the political objectives, we should be hugely grateful for Featherstone's rescuing of the past relational geographies of resistance." (Progress in Human Progress in Human Progress, February 2011)

"In summary, RSPI is an incisive and stimulating work that significantly enhances our understanding of the construction and operation of counter-globalization networks. It extends and develops relational accounts of political identities and space in important ways, contributing to debates in political theory, human geography and social movement." (Social Movement Studies, 22 October 2010)

"Featherstone's book contributes to our understanding of the formation of counter-global networks. He shows that transnational networks are not void of place. ... This book provides a good starting point for scholars who seek an understanding what happens to networks when subaltern relationships are spread across the globe." (Mobilization, March 2010)

"This optimistic take on the role of political contestation in world-making processes is a welcome change from the gloom and doom so typical of other geographical texts." (Environment and Planning A, 2009)

"This book powerfully engages with contemporary relational understandings of space by drawing upon, critiquing and developing a rich theoretical palette. This together with the use of evocative ethnographic material serves to provide a convincing account of how political identities are created, reworked and deployed in networked practices of resistance. The book makes a significant contribution to the theorizing and explaining of political identities and practices forged through the articulation of resistance in empirically varied contexts."
Paul Routledge, University of Glasgow

"Featherstone’s focus on the extra-local ties underpinning situated subaltern struggle offers a salutary alternative to conventional accounts of place-based resistance. His book’s overall argument is as generative as it is critical for remapping global grievances and the interlinked insurgencies they inspire."
Matthew Sparke, University of Washington, Seattle

‘Doreen Massey has consistently, over a period of 40 years, been one of the most imaginative and inspiring geographers at work in the world. Her work has combined theoretical innovation – in a way that defies simple categorisation – with political commitment in an exemplary fashion. This important collection of essays explores and extends some of the defining aspects of her work.’
Ray Hudson, Pro-Vice-Chancellor and Professor of Geography, University of Durham

See More
Back to Top