Thank you for visiting us. We are currently updating our shopping cart and regret to advise that it will be unavailable until September 1, 2014. We apologise for any inconvenience and look forward to serving you again.

Wiley
Wiley.com
Print this page Share
E-book

Decolonizing Development: Colonial Power and the Maya

ISBN: 978-1-4443-9979-0
328 pages
July 2011, Wiley-Blackwell
Decolonizing Development: Colonial Power and the Maya (1444399799) cover image
Winner of the 2010 James M. Blaut Award in recognition of innovative scholarship in cultural and political ecology (Honors of the CAPE specialty group (Cultural and Political Ecology))

Decolonizing Development investigates the ways colonialism shaped the modern world by analyzing the relationship between colonialism and development as forms of power.

  • Based on novel interpretations of postcolonial and Marxist theory and applied to original research data
  • Amply supplemented with maps and illustrations
  • An intriguing and invaluable resource for scholars of postcolonialism, development, geography, and the Maya
See More
List of figures.

Acknowledgements.

Abbreviations.

Introduction.

Part I: Colonizing the Maya.

1. The territorialization of southern Belize.

2. The matter of the Maya farm system.

3. An archaeology of Mayanism.

Part II: Aporias of development.

4. From colonial to development knowledge.

5. Settling: fieldwork in the ruins of development.

6. Finishing the critique of cultural ecology.

Conclusion.

Bibliography.

Index.

See More
Joel Wainwright is Assistant Professor in the Department of Geography at the Ohio State University.
See More

  • Investigates the ways colonialism shaped the modern world by analyzing the relationship between colonialism and development as forms of power
  • Based on novel interpretations of postcolonial and Marxist theory and applied to original research data
  • An intriguing and invaluable resource for scholars of postcolonialism, development, geography, and the Maya
See More
"Wainwright is to be applauded for marshalling his considerable intellectual skills to advancing our understanding of Maya colonial experiences (past and present) in the confines of Belize." (Social & Cultural Geography, February 2009)

"Theoretically sophisticated ... .It has some important things to say that are relevant to both scholars and practitioners concerned with development practices in the South today." (Geographical Journal, 2009)

"Culture studies sometimes receive a hasty, often incoherent introduction ... .Fortunately, this book is an exception. Wainwright provides a meticulous and actually readable explanation of the culture studies 'manifesto.' One of the interesting issues discussed was the Mayas' 'development' into settled farming, as opposed to their original milpa (i.e., slash and bum) agriculture. Recommended." (CHOICE, December 2008)

“Drawing on philosophy and political theory and a close study of Belize, Wainwright provides a startlingly original reading of development and its others. He shows how recognizing the national territoriality of developmental discourses highlights oft-overlooked continuities between colonialism and globalization, and forces us to reconsider the relation between metropolitan capitalism and its contestations.”
Eric Sheppard, Department of Geography, University of Minnesota

“Joel Wainwright has produced a wide-ranging and penetrating critique of development in Belize, which puts empirical meat on the bones of postcolonial, critical, and discursive theories. Sophisticated and deeply researched, this case study will have broad appeal. It speaks to the political and economic problems of indigenous people, and to the way these troubles are intertwined with the academic obsession with studying these groups.”
Richard Wilk, Department of Anthropology, Indiana University

See More

Related Titles

Back to Top