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Vision: Variations on Some Berkeleian Themes

ISBN: 978-1-55786-536-6
168 pages
December 1993, Wiley-Blackwell
Vision: Variations on Some Berkeleian Themes (1557865361) cover image
This book examines longstanding problems in the theory of vision. Each section begins by looking at the issues as they were raised and discussed by Berkeley. This work is unique in its blend of philosophical and historical perspectives on contemporary problems of readership.
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Introduction.

Essay I: Seeing Distance.

Essay II: Size.

Essay III: Perceptual Inference.

Essay IV: A Gibsonian Alternative?.

Bibliography.

Index.
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Robert Schwartz is Professor of Philosophy at the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee.
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* Wide interdisciplinary readership.
* Unique historical perspective on contemporary vision studies.
* Contains an extended critical examination of the views of J. J. Gibson.
* Important new analysis of Berkeley's work on vision.
* Wide interdisciplinary readership.
* Unique historical perspective on contemporary vision studies.
* Contains an extended critical examination of the views of J. J. Gibson.
* Important new analysis of Berkeley's work on vision.
See More
"A penetrating and persistent effort to clarify concepts involved in Berkeley's work on vision results here in an illuminating critique of a large body of philosophical writing." Nelson Goodman, Harvard University

"Vision is written engagingly and with exemplary clarity, and will surely appeal to a wide audience. This important book is must reading for anybody interested in the study of vision." David M. Rosenthal, The City University of New York

"Vision is an exciting combination of historical and contemporary explorations of philosophical issues about our most studied sense. The book will be valuable to anyone with interests in philosophical questions about perception." Richard E. Grandy, Rice University

"This book by a philosopher is much more than an essay clarifying Berkeley's ideas about vision. It is clearly reasoned, beautifully written analysis of the problems and contemporary theories of perception. It is a powerful critique of current assumptions about the perception of distance, size, constancy, the moon illusion, the concept of inference and the "Gibsonian alternative", among other topics. The clarity of Schwartz's thinking and formulations is inspiring. I recommend the book to all my colleagues in the fields of vision and perception. Professor Irvin Rock, University of California, Berkeley

"An enjoyable and educational read, and should appeal to lecturers and students in perception, cognition, philosophy, and history of science." Perception

"Highly recommended." Choice

"Schwartz has written a beautifully clear book, one which it is a pleasure to read, and there is much to learn from what he has to say about the issues set out." Mind

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