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Secure Connected Objects

ISBN: 978-1-78630-059-1
314 pages
June 2017, Wiley-ISTE
Secure Connected Objects (1786300591) cover image

Description

In this book, the authors focus on the concrete aspects of IoT (Internet of Things): the daily operation, on the ground, of this domain, including concrete and detailed discussion of the designs, applications and realizations of Secure Connected Things and IoT. As experts in the development of RFID and IoT technologies, the authors offer the reader a highly technical discussion of these topics, including the many approaches (technical, security, safety, ergonomic, economic, normative, regulations, etc.) involved in Secure Connected Objects projects.

This book is written both for readers wishing to familiarize themselves with the complex issues surrounding networking objects and for those who design these connective "things".

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Table of Contents

Foreword xi

Preface xiii

Acknowledgements xv

Preamble xvii

Part 1. Introduction – The Buzz about IoT and IoE 1

Chapter 1. Introduction 3

1.1. Definition of communicating- or connected Things 3

Chapter 2. The (Overly) Vast World of IoT 9

2.1. 2011–2016: the craze for the term "Connected Thing" 9

2.2. The true goal of this book 14

Chapter 3. Why a Connectable Thing? 15

3.1. Examples of connectable things 15

Part 2. Constraints Surrounding an IoT Project 21

Chapter 4. Aspects to be Taken into Consideration 23

4.1. Aspects pertaining to the concrete realization of Connected Things 23

Chapter 5. Financial and Marketing Aspects 27

5.1. Economic aspects 27

5.2. Ergonomic aspects 29

Chapter 6. Technical and Industrial Aspects 31

6.1. Technical aspects 31

6.2. Energy aspects 32

6.3. Industrial aspects 39

Chapter 7. Regulatory and Normative Aspects 41

7.1. Regulatory aspects and recommendations 41

7.2. Health-related recommendations 43

7.3. Societal regulations and individual freedoms (privacy) 45

7.4. Environmental regulations and recycling 53

7.5. Normative aspects 55

Chapter 8. Security Aspects 59

8.1. Security aspects 59

8.2. Judging the quality of security 80

8.3. Some thoughts about security, privacy and IoT 81

8.4. Vulnerabilities and attacks in the IoT chain 82

Part 3. Overall Architecture of the IoT Chain 87

Chapter 9. Communication Models in IoT 89

9.1. Communication models in IoT 89

Chapter 10. Overall Architecture of an IoT System 101

10.1. Overall architecture of a CT and IoT solution 101

10.2. From a more technological point of view 102

10.3. The very numerous protocols involved 113

Part 4. Detailed Description of the IoT Chain 117

Part 4A. From the User (The Outside World) to the Thing 119

Chapter 11. From the Outside World to the Thing 121

11.1. Connection of the Thing to the outside world 121

Chapter 12. The Secure Connected Thing 127

12.1. Physical constitution of the Thing 127

Part 4B. From the Thing to the Base Station 131

Chapter 13. Means of Communication to Access a Base Station 133

13.1. Possible network connectivity technologies 133

13.2. Medium-range MR Wide-band (hundreds of meters) 136

13.3. Long-range (LR – tens of kilometers) 138

13.4. LTN – Low-Throughput Network 152

Part 4C. From the Base Station to the Server 203

Chapter 14. Network Access Layer – IP 205

14.1. IPv4 205

14.2. IPv6 207

14.3. 6LoWPAN 209

Chapter 15. The Server 215

15.1. Conventional functions of a server in IoT 216

Chapter 16. Transport and Messaging Protocols 219

16.1. Transport 219

16.2. "IoT messaging" technologies 221

16.3. Protocols 225

16.4. HTTP – HyperText Transfer Protocol 226

16.5. HTTP/2 227

16.6. MQTT – Message Queuing Telemetry Transport 227

16.7. CoAP – Constrained Application Protocol 229

16.8. XMPP 230

16.9. DDS – Data Distribution Service 231

16.10. AMQP – Advanced Message Queuing Protocol 232

16.11. SMQ 233

16.12. JMS – Java Messaging Service 233

16.13. Other protocols 234

16.14. The broker 234

16.14.1 Examples of possibilities 235

16.15. Programming languages 236

16.16. Operating systems 236

Part 4D. From the Cloud Server to the Various Users 237

Chapter 17. Cloud and Fog Computing 239

17.1. Cloud computing? 239

17.2. Example: the PaaS platform AWS IoT 242

17.3. How security is managed 244

17.4. Fog computing? 245

17.5. Big data 246

17.6. Natural interfaces 247

Part 5. Concrete Realization of an IoT Solution Examples and Costs 249

Chapter 18. Examples of the Concrete Realization of Connected Things 251

18.1. Subject/application taken as an example 251

Chapter 19. Cost Aspects 261

19.1. CAPEX and OPEX are in the same boat… 261

Conclusion 279

Bibliography 281

Index 285

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